Pale Rider

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About Pale Rider

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  1. My perception is for someone who hates motorcycle racing, you seem to post an awful lot about it. Especially ready to pounce whenever there is a racing incident.
  2. Dear oh dear, do you ever post about anything else?
  3. I like Port Erin. We went down there last year for Port Erin day. But the one thing that let it down in the evening were the drinks queues at The Bay and The Falcons Nest Hotel. 30 minutes to get served at the Falcons Nest, and we didn't even bother with The Bay as the queue was way outside the pub. It was like the pubs didn't know Port Erin day or TT were on and hadn't put enough staff on. So maybe if Bushys had a beer tent near to the stage on the beach, it would take the pressure off the other bars.
  4. Leaving the argument on whether it is right to put motorbikes in the back of a van to go on the ferry for fare purposes aside for one moment, I can see the advantage if a group of mates hire a van to put their bikes in, to come to the TT. The bikes might be safer in the back of a van on the crossing. The van gives you room to keep personal belongings safe or carry more luggage that wouldn't be possible on a bike, and gives you somewhere to store the bikes overnight too, or shelter from the rain during the day. Regarding the issue on whether this practice is fare dodging or not, perhaps people wouldn't be tempted if the Steam Packet didn't hike their prices up quite so much for TT. With the amount of traffic coming over surely the Steam Packet would still make a healthy profit charging standard or even slightly increased fare as they know every boat will be full. I priced bringing the car over for MGP, and not so many years ago you could get that for around a standard fare, this year nearly £400. I've decided to fly instead for just over a quarter of that price. I'm fortunate that I can stay with a friend when visiting, but I feel sorry for the TT fans who firstly pay through the nose to get to the island, then pay alot again for accommodation, food, drink etc. It certainly isn't a cheap holiday!
  5. If they had missed out the accidents you would be complaining they were covering things up! As I said before no true road racing fan wants to see competitors get hurt. Anyway I've posted way more than I've intended on this, I'll leave you all to continue to fight this matter out, and I shall look forward to visiting the island in August for the MGP.
  6. I notice you didn't answer my question on how much say the riders should have on the future of the TT? And it would be interesting to see the adverts that market the TT as dangerous? I don't understand how I'm misrepresenting what you are writing when I have given you examples of how other forms of motorsport can be dangerous. It was you that said other motorsport wasn't that dangerous! There is a whole world of motorsport outwith the TT.
  7. Apart from the fact that all motor racing circuits have signs warning spectators that "motorsport can be dangerous" perhaps? Only at Croft racing circuit last week in the British Touring Car championship, due to oil being dropped on a rain soaked track during qualifying, 3 drivers ended up being cut out of their cars involved in a 12 car pile up. 2 of them ended up in intensive care and induced comas, the other had a broken leg. So yes, it can be dangerous. Rallying involves hurtling along gravel tracks through forests where you could smack into a tree. Billy Monger unfortunately had to have his legs amputated after an awful crash in a single seater race at Donington recently. Ian Hutchinson suffered his horrendous leg injuries at Silverstone not a road race. So to say motorsport apart from Manx road racing "isn't that dangerous" isn't entirely true. There can be different types of danger of course, but I wouldn't say motorsport was a non risk sport in any form. You obviously think the TT should be done away with, but do you think the competitors should have some say in its future? They after all turn up to race. If they thought it was too much of a risk, they wouldn't enter surely? No entrants, no racing, no TT.
  8. Which I suspect is what attracts the competitors to enter racing on the mountain course in the first place. There are numerous pursuits that people do in life that can be classed as dangerous, or risk taking. Some people are just attracted to that sort of thing.
  9. The world of road racing is a strange one. If we start with the riders first. They are the first to admit that road racing is dangerous. They are the first to admit that is why they participate. They are first to admit that their families don't always like what they do. The TT has long since been a stand alone race from any championship series. So no one is forced to compete. Those who do know the risks and have to have a level of competency before they can qualify for the TT. Outwith the TT, motorbike road racing is a very popular sport in Ireland. Northwest 200, Ulster grand prix, Tandragee, Cookstown 100 etc. Banning the TT would not be the end of road racing. The Isle of Man is well known for the TT. It's what puts it on the map. If that were to go, could that affect the economy? Would you lose a large amount of visitors? Possibly so, because if the TT ended presumably so would the MGP and Classic TT. With high ferry fares and awkward times of travel, the bike fans will make the effort to visit, but would normal tourists looking for a long weekend away? Probably not so much. But that should be a decision for the Manx residents as to whether the TT continues, for whatever reason. Now the spectators. The people you accuse of enjoying seeing death. That could not be further from the truth. People have their favourite riders, they follow them through their careers. If something bad happens to that rider, the fans are gutted. If a race is red flagged there is a silence throughout the spectators. The fans come to see some fast and spectacular racing, lap records being broken, not the death of competitors. I have attended the TT since 2004. I enjoy many forms of motorsport, and after initially visiting a friend who moved to the island, and thought the TT was a unique event. I certainly don't come to see riders dying. I come for the racing, and to have a few beers with my mate in the evening in the local pubs and also to take in a bit of live music too. All motorsport is dangerous. Whether it is track racing, road racing, bikes, cars, Formula1, or rallying. Are we going to ban them all? If you don't like the TT that's fine. But at least get your facts correct about the competitors or fans views and attitudes to the sport before typing the type of post above.
  10. As a fairly regular visitor the island, I have noticed that travel costs have increased over the last few years. Because of where I live, Heysham is quicker to get to than Liverpool. (Around a 3hr drive instead of nearly 5hrs). On occasion I used to come over for a long weekend, park the car at the port and travel as a foot passenger. Heysham port now want £12 per day parking. Not that long ago it was about £6.50 or £7.50. Bringing the car over at TT was always expensive and to be avoided, but at MGP it was more or less standard fare. I priced it this year and I couldn't get the car over for less than £388. And that was trying a variety of dates and times. The ferry times don't lend themselves to the short break either. A 5 day saver fare is offered, including days of travel. So you either arrive at 6pm on your first day, or have to miss a nights sleep and travel in the middle of the night and get the 2am boat so you arrive (shattered) at around 6am. Then on the return leg you either have to leave the island first thing in the morning on your 5th day, or wait until the late sailing and only arrive back in Heysham at 11.30pm. Not much good if you have work in the morning in Scotland. An earlier sailing from Heysham might encourage the weekend visitor, if they are getting at least half a day on their first day on the island. A late afternoon sailing from Douglas means most people could still get home at a reasonable hour. Flights are slightly better time wise, but Citywing in 2016 still managed to charge £297 incl taxes from Glasgow for TT, but this year for MGP I could get a flight for a lesser cost of £164. (Obviously that flight is now fantasy, but at least I got a refund from my credit card co). I am now having to fly from Manchester with Flybe for MGP as Eastern don't fly at weekends from Glasgow and Loganair flights from Edinburgh don't start until September. As I am visiting a friend when over, I don't have accommodation costs, but can easily see why some short break visitors could be priced out the market if they have to add hotel costs to a fairly high travel price, and the hassle of inconvenient travel times. Instead they could just jump in the car and drive to many equally scenic destinations in the UK.
  11. Possibly not, however, we might be better off financially, none of the TT expenses to pay and no department of tourism to maintain? Possibly. So if for whatever reason the TT races become unpopular or attract less visitors it should be up to Manx residents to decide if it continues, and what direction the island will take in the future. Although I don't think that will be an issue for a while yet.
  12. To follow up on Boris Johnsons post about the TT putting off potential tourists. I don't agree as the TT visitors are the majority of your tourists nowadays. As someone from the UK who visits the island at TT plus at non TT times I can make the following observations. Many folk in the UK have only vaguely heard of the Isle of Man. Some will confuse it with the Isle of Wight, others will have no idea it could be a holiday destination. Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT. For those that have considered visiting outwith TT the prohibitive travel costs put them off. Due to the ferry timings its not an easy place to go even for a long weekend. I have a pal who looked into visiting with his camper van, and it was cheaper and easier to drive to Devon for the week rather than come across on the ferry. The Isle of Man tourist board don't seem to advertise a lot in the UK. A small ad in the Sunday Post with a grainy black and white photo of a hiker on a hillside that could be anywhere isn't going to entice people. The TV campaign a couple of years ago was poor too. Even if people did decide to flock to the island where are they going to stay? Bit of a catch 22 that one. No one is going to open hotels if there are no tourists. Tourists aren't going to go to a place where they can't find a hotel. So really, if the TT and MGP went, would there be a tourist industry on the island at all?
  13. I've never heard such moaning about a pizza shop. I've occasionally been in pizza hut here in the uk and to be fair it was OK. Its just a pizza. The way folk are going on you would think it was an edible poison shop opening in Douglas. I've forgotten the name of the pizza shop in Broadway now that is a rip off. Never had anything out of there but their prices are expensive for what is essentially posh toasted cheese! If the isle of man residents hate large chains so much, then don't shop there! Yet Tesco, M&S etc are still open on the island, so someone must shop in them.
  14. I'm neither disabled nor a narrow-minded racist, as you appear to be. So f**k of you Jock c*nt and get back to your Buckfast and deep-fried Mars Bars. Can Alex do an English accent? He'd make a great Toad of Toad Hall. What part would Nicola play? Love it. I'm not a narrow minded racist then launch into every Scottish insult going! Deep fried Mars bars bit of a myth. The only people I know daft enough to try one have been tourists buying them from the one chip shop in Glasgow which sold them. As for Buckfast, a small minority of chavs that drink that, most of the population don't. But don't let that get in the way of a good rant.
  15. He was born in Linlithgow. That's nearer Edinburgh than Glasgow.