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guzzi

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guzzi last won the day on December 6

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About guzzi

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  1. Flag Of Sicily Is Similar

    At a stretch, I understand how you can see it as a representation of cube, tilted in space and viewing one corner. But I don't agree that you need to see it as a cube in order to understand the motto. That surely just refers to the 3 feet? Heraldry doesn't demand perfect fit between symbol and motto, or any fit at all, for that matter!
  2. Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370

    I agree. Recognising and mitigating the risk of those vulnerabilities is essential. I nevertheless think that a fully automated, pilotless, system could be devised which had a lower failure rate than the human equivalent. There have been two instances in recent years were a pilot has deliberately flown a passenger airliner into the ground in a murder/suicide.
  3. Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370

    Yes, AF447 did briefly have an iced up pitot tube that caused the speeds to disagree, the autopilot to disconnect and the flight control system to degrade to alternate law, where stall protections were not available. However, all that pilots needed to do was to do nothing, just keep the aeroplane at the same thrust settings and flying straight and level. They had all their important flying displays except reliable airspeed. The icing cleared itself very quickly, the speed data became correct and the aeroplane began telling the crew every few seconds that it had stalled, all the way down to the ocean. The pilots still did not recognise their actual situation, which would just have required them to pitch the plane down. I would assume that 'do nothing' would be the default for any fully automatic, pilotless system in circumstances where basic air data became unreliable, and that would have been spot on the circumstances of AF447. BA38 was a mechanical failure caused by icing in the fuel system and both engines rolling back to flight idle during the final approach. Here is what the AAIB say about the flap selection: The aircraft manufacturer carried out an analysis of the nal approach of G-YMMM’s accident ight to establish the effect of selecting flap 25 at around 240 ft agl. The analysis concluded that, had the crew left the flaps at flap 30, the aircraft would have touched down about 51 m (168 ft) short of the actual touchdown on the accident ight, still within the airfield boundary. One thing the crew omitted to do is cut-off the fuel pumps, which meant that fuel continued to be pumped out after the plane had crashed, during the evacuation.
  4. Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370

    This: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_Honeywell_Uninterruptible_Autopilot But the official line is that this has not been rolled out to any commercial aircraft, precisely because of fears about hacking. If the systems could be hardened enough to completely protect them against hacking, then they would help, not hinder security. MH370 might have been prevented, in fact. The current generation of pilots who fly us around all the time might have thousands of flying hours recorded in their log-books, but if they are flying a modern jet airliner, it is quite likely that very few of them have more than just a few tens of hours actually flying the aircraft, rather than just monitoring what the automation is doing. When the automatic systems do occasionally throw in the towel for whatever reason mid-flight, they sometimes have the greatest of difficulty understanding what state the aeroplane is actually in. The crew of Air France 447, to give an infamous example, failed completely to recognise their actual situation before their aircraft was irrecoverably close to the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. The podcast below 'Children of the Magenta' about the 'automation paradox' makes interesting listening. https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/children-of-the-magenta-automation-paradox-pt-1/ The argument there is that pilots ought to practice actually flying the aircraft much more than they do at present, and ought to train for situations where the automation packs up. Who could disagree? But an alternative in future might be to take the human element out of the equation altogether. The paradox is that whilst the human interface with the automation might have caused accidents like AF447, it has actually prevented countless other accidents by kicking in to keep the plane within safe operational limits. Sure, if we took the pilots away, then there would still be accidents. They might result from weather, from material failures or from errors made by programmers in offices thousands of miles away and months or years before. But if there are fewer overall, that's a good thing, surely? The big question is whether we will be prepared to accept that?
  5. Flag Of Sicily Is Similar

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Mana#Old_Irish This amplifies the etymology in my previous post. In short, it suggests that Mana (and therefore Mannin and it's mutated form Vannin) is cognate with the Celtic name of other isles having mountains, and cites the Isle of Man and Anglesey (Ynys Mōn) as examples.
  6. Flag Of Sicily Is Similar

    Yes, but those are all germanic languages, which are part of the same linguistic branch as English. I would be more convinced if you had some cognates for moon within the Celtic languages. Welsh = lleuad, Irish = gealach not very similar to Mann or Vannin. The suggestion in Wiki is, at least to me, more plausible than a connection to the English word 'Moon": The name is probably cognate with the Welsh name of the island of Anglesey, Ynys Môn,[16] usually derived from a Celtic word for 'mountain' (reflected in Welsh mynydd, Breton menez, and Scottish Gaelic monadh),[17][18] from a Proto-Celtic *moniyos.
  7. Social media is ripping the fabric of society apart

    "We curate our lives around this perceived sense of perfection, because we get rewarded in these short term signals: Hearts, likes, thumbs up," Palihaptiya said. "We conflate that with value and we conflate it with truth, and instead what it really is is fake, brittle popularity that's short term and leaves you even more vacant and empty before you did it." "You don't realise it but you are being programmed." Wow. Rings bells? Well yes, if I'm honest, it does. What to do, what to do ....
  8. Flag Of Sicily Is Similar

    Great, can you cite them, please? I would genuinely like to know.
  9. Flag Of Sicily Is Similar

    Yes, I was surprised by the moon thing. I can't find any reference at all to the origin of Mann or Mona being moon, and the word for moon in modern Celtic languages doesn't bear much resemblance to any word for moon that I can find. The quick look I did suggested a possible etymology that was related to the word for mountain, i.e. 'Mountainous Island'.
  10. The Law is an Ass

    Some seem to be police cock-ups - the two speeding offenders were said to be have been cautioned because the officers weren't trained in the use of the radar gun. So presumably, there might well have been evidential problems that undermined prosecution. The drink driving does seem strange though. Four times the limit is hardly marginal, and would have surely been very dangerous. So what were the technicalities?
  11. The Law is an Ass

    That clearly wouldn't be of any interest. The report does explain that it is context that indicates inappropriateness.
  12. 2018 phone book

    It isn't just using mobiles instead of landlines. I rarely use the phone system at all other than for internet access. FaceTime, Skype, Messenger etc.are more useful as they are free and equally available wherever you are.
  13. Ronaldsway Airport

    Yes, I've only just spotted that Easy are taking us to Belfast International. That's quite a good hub for flights to Europe, so maybe that's what they are hoping will fill their seats. Mind you, if the Dublin route was strengthened, Dublin would be an even better hub for flights worldwide, complete with US immigration/border pre-clearance.
  14. MUA Water Whitewash

    I agree that they must pay. But I think it goes beyond that and that if the Packet were negligent, there ought to be prosecutions.
  15. Ronaldsway Airport

    Seems to be a Monday & Friday return flight starting in June 2018. That's another 130 odd passengers compared to 30 on Eastern's J41s, so I hope they get security sorted out. They really do need to be planning for that to be the norm, not the 50 seaters that used to dominate our routes.
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