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Chinahand

Evolutionary Science And Its Implications

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Surely debating such things with a creationist is simply time wasting and leading to nothing other than frustration.

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A wonderful study looking at animal life in sediments in Antarctica.

 

The slow change of species is suddenly interrupted by the mass extinction which caused the demise of the dinosaurs.

 

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Every now and then you can come across an example of the wonderful depth of scientific knowledge.

 

 

The video is of the bite mechanism of a conodont, an animal from the Cambrian era about 500 million years ago.

 

Edited to add - here's a nice review article giving the history of our knowledge of these animals and our understanding of their fossils and relatedness to other vertibrates.

 

Plus an article showing how the fossil teeth have been examined and fitted together to understand the bite mechanism shown in the video

Edited by Chinahand

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Nick Lane has written a very deep, and quite technical, book called the Vital Question discussing the scientific evidence for, and resulting theories about the origins of life.

 

It's excellent.

 

As a result he was awarded the Royal Society's Michael Faraday prize for which he gave a lecture. Enjoy it!

 

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If you spent three and a half billion years stirring a cup of coffee, eventially you'll end up with something snorkelling in your cup.

 

Especially after the milk's gone off after a couple of days.

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Fascinating evidence coming out of California about a population from the genus Homo living there over 100,000 years ago.

It is a really contested claim - they haven't found any human bones, just stone tools and broken bones.  As one researcher says:

To confirm the presence of an undefined species of Homo in the Americas at 130,000 years ago requires indisputable evidence. While the Cerutti Mastodon site challenges our knowledge of the peopling of America and forces us to think beyond what is currently known, fresh fractured bone together with five large cobbles is not extraordinary evidence.

I also like John Hawks' reaction (he writes a great blog on palaeontology here):

"I’m not usually at a loss for words, but this one has left me and many of my friends speechless."

More evidence is required - a wonderful opportunity to increase human understanding.

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9 hours ago, Chinahand said:

Fascinating evidence coming out of California about a population from the genus Homo living there over 100,000 years ago.

It is a really contested claim - they haven't found any human bones, just stone tools and broken bones.  As one researcher says:

To confirm the presence of an undefined species of Homo in the Americas at 130,000 years ago requires indisputable evidence. While the Cerutti Mastodon site challenges our knowledge of the peopling of America and forces us to think beyond what is currently known, fresh fractured bone together with five large cobbles is not extraordinary evidence.

I also like John Hawks' reaction (he writes a great blog on palaeontology here):

"I’m not usually at a loss for words, but this one has left me and many of my friends speechless."

More evidence is required - a wonderful opportunity to increase human understanding.

And to upset the Creationists...

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Great lecture looking at how sequencing DNA from ancient bones has improved and improved and hence given us deep insights into our ancestry with Neanderthals and Denisovians.

 

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