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the stinking enigma

Rivers of blood revisited.

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Posted (edited)

Have listened to a couple of these recently in the glorious beeb's revisiting of  what they see as history's greatest speeches. One by MLK then one by JFK, was hoping for one by the KLF next but they have chosen enoch powell instead. In it's original entirety. Must admit, it's a speech i have never listened to, be interesting to see where he was wrong and where he was  possibly right.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-43745447

Edited by the stinking enigma

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This thread will not go well.

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What a shame they took one sentence out of the entire speech as a “headline grabber”. There is nothing in that entire speech that is untrue. Enoch Powell was accurate in his view on the future of Great Britain.

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Posted (edited)

I think one has to make allowances for the historical context in which things were written or said, and what was acceptable at the time.  For example, the much loved Manx poet T. E. Brown used the "n*gger" word not once but twice in his 1891 poem "The Doctor" which you can read here:

http://manxliterature.com/sort-by-genre/genre/the-doctor/

He also used the word "cr*pples" when I am sure he meant to say "people with disabilities".

The poem incidentally has some interesting things to say about cholera epidemics on the island in the 1800s, which is why I was reading it in the first place.

Edited by BallaDoc
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How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy.

The effects are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity.

The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property — either as a child, a wife, or a concubine — must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men.

Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the Queen: all know how to die: but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it.

No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytising faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science — the science against which it [Islam] had vainly struggled — the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome.

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1 hour ago, BallaDoc said:

I think one has to make allowances for the historical context in which things were written or said, and what was acceptable at the time.  For example, the much loved Manx poet T. E. Brown used the "n*gger" word not once but twice in his 1891 poem "The Doctor" which you can read here:

http://manxliterature.com/sort-by-genre/genre/the-doctor/

He also used the word "cr*pples" when I am sure he meant to say "people with disabilities".

The poem incidentally has some interesting things to say about cholera epidemics on the island in the 1800s, which is why I was reading it in the first place.

I'm now a cripple, not simply a person with disabilities.  MY disabilities come about because I'm crippled. 

Disabilities such as being blind or deaf isn't crippling to those people affected nor do a number of other disabilities.

I'm not in the least bit into political correctness and much prefer to call a spade a spade.

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Rog, hope th lack of quotation marks doesn't mean you're trying to pass that off as your own.

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1 minute ago, mojomonkey said:

Rog, hope th lack of quotation marks doesn't mean you're trying to pass that off as your own.

No, I'm not but it does reflect my opinion almost to a tee but stops short of what has taken place since it was written.

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