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monasqueen

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monasqueen last won the day on May 21

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About monasqueen

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  1. Perhaps they were concerned that their heavy tanks might fall through the deck.
  2. Ynys Mon, to give Anglesey its proper name. (Monas Isle). One of the names that our radio newsreaders have trouble with, every time the two islands' football teams play each other.
  3. Don't Panic !!! Ben my Chree has been allowed in, so the nasty stuff must have been eliminated or neutralised.
  4. I love all the loose chairs that will fly everywhere in "a bit of weather". At least the tables look like they are bolted down.
  5. Well done. Richard Branson is another example of someone who worked his way through this sort of "barrier". At one of my office jobs across, the filing clerks were given a table to sort documents into alphabetic order, with a row of large letters at the top of the table... A...B...C... The dyslexic in my trainee time wrote a poem which only she could read. I spent ages with her transcribing it into recognisable english, and it was put up on the wall. Creativity, imagery, etc... it was all there. A lot of people are too easily put down, then stay down. Some of them seem to believe that they should be able to progress without any effort on their part. There is not enough emphasis on positivity and self belief. A lot of things that look impossible can be done, given just a little determination.
  6. I was taught to read and write by my parents. When I was training to be a teacher, the idea was that kids should not have their spelling , grammar, etc... over corrected, because that would cause them to lose their enthusiasm for writing, and cramp their style. This is probably why so many teachers carnt speel.
  7. From what I've heard, she's put Auckland back into lockdown.
  8. Whilst everyone is working out how and why the airport failed to open for a plane that should have been arriving with a blaze of publicity (???)... Will somebody please publish the result of the rugby match?
  9. The papers are flown in when Ben is not scheduled to have an overnight crossing to Heysham. Sometimes it is to give them a maintenance break. At other times, like this last weekend, there is an overnight sailing to Ireland. Ben went to Belfast on Saturday night.
  10. But teachers are expected to impart "life skills" to their charges. This is something few of them have now. Perhaps it is true that once upon a time, common sense could be taught, but now it can't, because the teachers were not taught it themselves. It is certainly now a rare skill amongst the younger generations. Teachers who went through war experiences had life (and death) experience in bundles, and it seems to be the case that they were always the most highly respected.
  11. This was in the late 1960s. From what you say, just as things went sour for teachers? I suppose part of the problem was that, at least at my Grammar School. the teaching profession was being heavily pushed as a potential career, possibly because the teachers there had no experience of other jobs themselves, so could not extol the virtues of other types of work. Thinking back, there was the teacher who was so fed up, he left and went to work on bin lorries.
  12. My experience entirely. I trained as a teacher, partly because there were teachers in the family, partly because I couldn't think of anything else I wanted to do, and, I suppose, there was the lure of those nice long holidays. What spoiled it for me was that during school, then college, holidays, I had worked at a number of different jobs - shop, packing factory, postal delivery, etc., etc., and I got a bit of "real life experience". I then went into teaching practice, and found that in the staff room, all the teachers could find to chat about was who was the head teacher's pet, which teacher had more supplies of pencils/paper than the others, and exceptionally, what had happened on last night's soap on TV. There was no talk about anything that was "real life". There was still the syndrome that put a dyslexic (but very intelligent) kid at the back of the class to be ignored, because they were going to need too much work. I hated it, did not pursue teaching as a career, and got an office job. This was a very long number of years ago. Is the profession any better now??? The union lady spoke of the amount of work that the teachers did during lockdown, helping with home schooling projects etc... I have no doubt that a good number of them did sterling work, and have nothing but praise for those who did.... but.... how many of the 800 or so did take advantage of the situation and lie out in their gardens sunbathing, enjoying the easy life, and getting paid for their inactivity? Or am I just being cynical?
  13. If they.re spending all that for cyclists, then they should be taxing bikes and/or lycra to help pay for it.
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