Jump to content

madmanxpilot

Regulars
  • Content Count

    418
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

294 Excellent

About madmanxpilot

  • Rank
    MF Senior Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. The Q400 wasn't subject to the same charge hike as the ATR. The majority of Flybe's flights into LHR were not PSO. To my knowledge, only the NQY service was.
  2. Only the IOM-LHR route. The others (EDI,BHD,ABZ,NQY) weren't.
  3. No, there was no cost associated with those procedures other than the paper they were written on. Certainly the Flybe management who engaged with NATS were already in post. AFAIK, it was the same at their end too. https://nats.aero/blog/2017/03/helping-flybe-flying-start-heathrow/
  4. I follow that principle too, but not every one has that luxury unfortunately. If the plane is already here on the IOM, you have a better chance of getting to where you want to be. It is very rare for weather to cause issues for departures. The visibility required for take off is a fraction of that required for landing, and if a hoodie is blowing, a different runway can be used.
  5. It had to be a separate entity, ie a UK Airline not a Manx one. The rebranding and associated administration involved cost that much. That figure is from the person who signed the cheque!
  6. A moot point, but he Q400 had no problem going into LHR, special operating procedures were agreed between Flybe and NATS to facilitate it. LHR slots were allocated to Flybe to operate there in their own right, not just for 'slot sitting'. There were multiple services from BHD and EDI on the Q400 into LHR. However, personally, I'd rather see regular services to Gatwick. LCY is too remote and subject to weather disruption due to landing minima.
  7. A couple of pages back in this thread, there was a discussion about why Manx Airlines grew into Manx Airlines Europe with its subsequent sale to BA. I've just been told the full story by someone who was involved at the time. Ironically, and perhaps unsurprisingly, it was mainly done to the IOMG's headlong unconsidered adoption of the European Open Skies ideals. Historically, any airline could fly anywhere provided they obtained a licence for the route from the CAA. This necessity was abolished in Europe and the UK when EU de-regulation was introduced. The IOMG, not understanding wha
  8. A couple of pages back in the thread, someone asked why Manx Airlines expanded into the UK and beyond With frequent services on smaller aeroplanes to more airports, you wouldn't need to plan for an overnight stay and potential inter airport transfers. This expense obviously needs to be factored into the true cost of getting off island.
  9. I didn't think so either, but wasn't sure. The point you made earlier about 'regulation not giving stability and convenient times' therefore hasn't been tested. I believe that if a carrier is given exclusivity on a certain route in return for contracted service level provision, that it would indeed give us those benefits. PSO routes ( https://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/air/internal-market/pso_en ) in the UK have benefited remote communities greatly. Newquay benefitted from a four times daily service to Gatwick. I can attest from personal experience that Flybe prioritised this rout
  10. What policy, if any, existed before the current official open skies policy?
  11. You'd need to get one of the first seats sold to get that price. The then the airline wouldn't see a penny of it because of APD. Simply loss leading fares to tempt business away from other carriers They were, however, charging £470 one way to Liverpool in March. They'd be making a few quid on that even after paying the APD!
  12. IOMG have said recently they need to review Open Skies. Not before time IMHO.
  13. Its a fairly open secret that the contract has been awarded to one party and another is challenging the decision. That process has basically run it's course and a formal announcement is likely imminent.
  14. Having an airline with a fully constituted base here is good. What would make it even better would be a commitment to a certain level of service by the airline, perhaps in return for exclusivity on certain routes or government financial support.
×
×
  • Create New...