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John Wright

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John Wright last won the day on July 11

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About John Wright

  • Birthday 06/20/1956

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    Douglas IoM, Querol Catlonia, Bansko Bulgaria

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  1. Except that isn’t integrated care. Integrated care is joined up care between primary, secondary, off island, end of life and social care throughout life both in the community and residential settings. Third sector and commercial may play a part in the shape of hospice or private care homes. voluntary oversight and reporting by people who have contact with the vulnerable in the community is a different question. It’s an alerting or reporting system. There’s no duty. Don’t see how the postie reporting mail piling up in porch or milkman reporting milk not taken in could breach confidentiality.
  2. So, why use the qualifying words “of sorts”
  3. You really aren’t up to date. Peel’s like Liverpool. It has two Cathedrals.
  4. The question was rhetorical. I raised digital secure passes with Ashie in March.
  5. There is an approved WHO and EU standard both for the QR code and the paper certificate pass. For paper it includes a security watermark and a barcode. The biometric info to be contained in the QR or barcode is also set out. Simple question, do IoMG letters comply? If not, why not?
  6. John Wright

    Manx Care

    At least the Manx Care board are taking serious initiatives to get the waiting lists down and to use spare, out of hours, theatre capacity. NEWS RELEASE - 29 July 2021 Manx Care has confirmed its plan to reduce waiting lists across nine clinical specialities. It will use the services of two UK-based external companies – Medefer and 18 Week Support – to deliver around 12,500 virtual outpatient consultations and inpatient procedures between September 2021 and March 2022. The Treasury has approved a business case to provide £1.86m of additional funding to deliver this activity. The backlog in waiting lists is a long-standing issue on the Island, which has been exacerbated by Covid-19. Medefer provides a virtual outpatient service to NHS Trusts across the UK, employing a large number of medical Consultants with experience across a broad range of clinical specialisms. They’ll work with Consultants at Noble’s Hospital to identify patients who have been waiting the longest for a specialist appointment, and who are eligible for their medical consultation to be delivered virtually. These patients will then be referred to Medefer. The Medefer Consultant will review the patient’s medical history and any relevant test results before conducting a detailed phone consultation with them. If any further tests are required, patients will have these on the Isle of Man. These will then be reviewed in a virtual follow-up appointment. The patient will then either be discharged under the care of their GP with a detailed treatment plan, or will be discharged back into the outpatient system for further follow-up appointments. Medefer will focus on the provision of around 10,000 appointments across the specialities of: Orthopaedics ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) Gastroenterology Cardiology Respiratory medicine Pain management Neurology 18 Week Support utilises a hospital’s surplus theatre capacity to deliver surgical procedures across a weekend period, and provides this service across a large number of UK NHS Trusts. A full clinical team from the company – including Consultants, Surgeons, Nurses and Theatre Practitioners – will travel to the Island to deliver around 2,500 Endoscopy and Cataract procedures at Noble’s. This will not impact on Manx Care’s core workforce, which is already working to capacity. Both Medefer and 18-Week Support are included in the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) inspection regime and are used extensively across the UK NHS, particularly around the restoration and recovery of services as NHS Trusts work to reduce their own waiting list backlogs caused by the pandemic. Consultants from both companies will work closely with Manx Care’s Consultants to ensure patients receive a joined-up care pathway, with support available by Island-based teams as needed. Manx Care’s CEO, Teresa Cope, commented: “Addressing the long-standing waiting list challenge across our health and care service is a priority for Manx Care. It’s unacceptable that people are having to wait as long as they are for consultations and treatment. Utilising the services of Medefer and 18-Week Support will allow us to focus on reducing our waiting lists across nine clinical specialisms whilst implementing the changes we need to deliver that will allow us to provide a long-term, sustainable service here on-Island. “The Covid-19 pandemic has only exacerbated the pressure on waiting lists over the last 17 months, and the delivery of health and social care services more broadly. Like the UK NHS, which is investing over £5 billion into the recovery of health and care services following the pandemic, Manx Care has secured funding to address a significant proportion of our waiting list backlog which will be targeted at those who have been waiting the longest time for their outpatient appointment or procedure.”
  7. On the IOM? The only way to learn decent English is to speak it with native speakers daily. Can you imagine future world leaders, in 20 years time, using colloquial Manx English in watered down Pulrose/Annacur/Pondy Scouse?
  8. John Wright

    Manx Care

    I’m sure it’s happened to all of us. But patients ( and clients ) are often poor at history and facts and doctors ( and lawyers ) poor at recording them. Things get recorded wrongly and misunderstandings occur. Its safer to refresh ( whether you’ve pre read or not ). Not only that but symptoms, conditions and focus of patient/client change with time. And, Annoymouse, you’ve hit the nail. If he’d blindly read and accepted the notes and previous diagnosis would have become self fulfilling. Its a conundrum.
  9. Well, after saying it couldn’t be done in June, they are bringing vaccinations forwards by shortening from 12 to 8 weeks. But even then they’ve fucked it up. Messaged half with the wrong new date! More than 500 appointments for second dose COVID-19 vaccinations are being brought forward to increase the number of Island residents with fullest protection from coronavirus. The interval between the two vaccinations is being reduced from 12 to eight weeks, in line with vaccination supplies and schedules, for the following appointments: Individuals who received their first dose (Moderna) on 14 June will now have their second dose on Monday 9 August All appointments will be at the same time and location as originally booked for the second appointments, with individuals being asked to attend at the new earlier date. 𝗗𝘂𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝗮𝗻 𝗲𝗿𝗿𝗼𝗿 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗮𝗹𝗹-𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝘀𝘆𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗺, 𝗮 𝗻𝘂𝗺𝗯𝗲𝗿 𝗼𝗳 𝗽𝗲𝗼𝗽𝗹𝗲 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝗯𝗲𝗲𝗻 𝗶𝗻𝗰𝗼𝗿𝗿𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗹𝘆 𝗻𝗼𝘁𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗲𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗮 𝗺𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝟭𝟬 𝗔𝘂𝗴𝘂𝘀𝘁. 𝗔𝗻𝘆𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗵𝗮𝘀 𝗯𝗲𝗲𝗻 𝗮𝗱𝘃𝗶𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗼𝗳 𝗮 𝗿𝗲𝘃𝗶𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝘀𝗵𝗼𝘂𝗹𝗱 𝗱𝗶𝘀𝗿𝗲𝗴𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘀𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗸 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗶𝗿 𝗼𝗿𝗶𝗴𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝘀𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗻𝗱 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗼𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗼𝗻 𝟳 𝗦𝗲𝗽𝘁. 𝗔𝗻𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗲𝗺𝗮𝗶𝗹 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗯𝗲 𝘀𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝘁𝗼𝗱𝗮𝘆 𝗿𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗻𝗳𝗶𝗿𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗶𝗿 𝘀𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗻𝗱 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗼𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗲. The Isle of Man, where you couldn’t make it up. Just think how many 2nd doses could have been done in the 2 week June hiatus!
  10. The decision by BA to abandon LCY predates Covid. Yes Logan picked it up and transferred to LHR for the reasons you’ve stated. There probably isn’t enough London traffic at present to justify rotations to two London Airports and one, 180 seater, rotation a day is possibly over supply. Its going to take at least 18 months for LCY and DUB and remoter/less popular routes to stabilise. For me, LGW is fine as I’m probably transferring to budget European short haul. For London, for work or short stay, LCY is much better than LHR, even for European business short haul.
  11. It wasn’t the vehicle having a dome, more not taking into account what happens to the height of the vehicle above the floor level, and thus clearance required, when the front wheels hit the level ground at the bottom of the slope entrance to the Government car park. There aren’t any buildings on top. There may be services, but it’s under the square in front of the court and to the side of the wedding room.
  12. Ah, the ones they had to build the larger garage for because they were bigger than the old ones.
  13. Queens was always oversubscribed. NUU they couldn’t give courses away for free ( actually with grants they were free - but students didn’t want to go there ). Sure the troubles may have had something to do with it, but in the 60’s Coleraine had a population considerably lower than Douglas and closed at 9pm and all day Sunday. There was nothing to do. Douglas actually got an extra hour. What does what mummy and daddy think is a safe place have to do with where anyone studied, ever ( unless it’s an adverse reaction to them trying to send you somewhere “safe” )
  14. When that was being proposed we didn’t have the money to fund. We’ve now got University College, issuing degrees validated by Chester. And of course the Marine Biological was a constituent part of Liverpool University with a hall of residence in the centre of the village. But the biggest problem, dating back 50-60 years ago was the experience with New University of Ulster out at Coleraine in Northern Ireland. Amazing site, stunning architecture, some world class courses. And no one would go there from Britain, and most students in Northern Ireland weren’t too keen. Too remote, too far, not enough happening. Difficult to get to. Of course, today it’s very successful, but after a rocky start, merger with Magee in Derry, Ulster Polytechnic in Jordanstown and other entities in the early 80’s ( because of low uptake of courses ) to become University of Ulster.
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