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StuartT

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Everything posted by StuartT

  1. It's an excellent site, lots of interesting pictures in the other sections too. They do a series on interesting things hidden underground too. There is one error however. They say that Ramsey station was on the supermarket site - whereas we all know it was actually on the Ramsey Bakery Site and where the Commissioners Workshops are. The walls remain in places, and at one time there was still a loading/cattle dock, which sadly got destroyed when the comissioners built their workshop. I can recall it being there in the 90's. It's sad to reflect that towards the end the Steam train could run from Ramsey to Douglas in under 70 minutes (the electric tram actually took longer). Nowadays it takes the bus around an hour and a half. Even allowing for the trip into Peel (which the train did not make - however it did have to shunt to join the Peel Train to Douglas) that is a significant addition to the journey. So who says that steam railway cannot compete with Buses as a form of public transport???.....
  2. I know this thread is an old one, but actually you can.... though it's not very straightforward... Walk from QB to NSC via the old railway line - in the trees to the right is the remains of one of the old crossing huts. Then follow the NSC cycleway/roadway round to the bridge, cross the river. If you're strictly following it walk back to Mcdonalds (you can see the remains of the embankment on the carpark) or walk through gate by the Ellan Vannin Gym. You'll walk behind the Peel Road Garage, continue on to the back of Eurocars. You'll hit a chainlink fence - if you walk up the side of the embankment you can bypass it. You can then walk under either portal of Pulrose Bridge. From there you can walk along (though it may be overgrown) to where the fence marks the end of the accessible track. Beyond that you will see a siding laid on the site of the Peel Line. You'll have to head back through the Hills Meadow industrial estate or retrace your tracks. The yard is gated off and things are a lot more health and safety paranoid particularily since they built the bus depot alongside. In the old days you could continue along and cross the tracks, then come in the bottom of the station yard, then get onto North Quay. There used to be the old corregated Iron shed which had many old carriages, wagons and No 5 Mona and No 6 Peveril in. Now things are a lot less accessible...
  3. I've noticed at times when using Skype to call from IOM to UK, it does crash periodically. However most of the time it's not been an issue whilst chatting.
  4. Did you miss that bit about refusing to help put the shoes and coat back on???.. Security is supposedly a public servant - there to protect and serve the public, not terrorise the Air Travelling Public like an airport directors SA just because 10 years ago some airliners got flown into the worlds tallest building... (We don't have this palaver when we travel on the tubes, buses or when we go down the pub or to a rememberance day service - yet in this country terrorist attacks have taken place more recently and with more frequency in such locations than on airliners).... There is indeed a common theme - whilst most of the complainants on this thread are prepared to comply with the requests of a security officer they expect to be treated with respect, and those of them who are disabled should be entitled to assistance whilst complying with the checks. Furthermore they have a right to be treated in a respectful manner... And they should have the right to complain and protest if they feel that they have not been treated with respect - not 'blackmailed' into keeping quiet with the threat that they'll just be subjected to more of the same treatment, unnecessarily detained or prevented from flying. If airport security is really such an essential job it should be carried out by professionals like the police, not some private security force. Furthermore codes of conduct and the procedures for complaint should be clearly displayed in the airport terminal at security points. Passengers should be as entitled to know their rights as to what they must do to comply with the security procedures...
  5. That's probably because you are booking last minute. Try at least a week ahead next time and you should get it for £40-something return. I fully understand that, however it's still a con to demand £80+ simply because someone isn't able to book earlier (eg as in when they're relying on someone else to let them know their offduty, if they're unsure of their commitments till the last minute, or if someone is ill, or another last minute emergency). £40 - £50 would be a reasonable last minute fare, £20 - £30 would be a better 'bargain' fair. These con artists don't need to charge the astonomical amount they do, they just take advantage of the fact that some people aren't able to book until the last minute and then milk it for whatever it's worth because they know there's no other alternative (as the airlines are playing the same game). Given that they have the monopoly user agreement they should be more strictly regulated on what they can charge for last minute bookings. If they don't need to charge that amount, then they shouldn't be allowed too.... Incidentally if you book at the last minute and pay a disgusting amount, and they cancel the sailings are you entitled to demand back the amount that you wouldn't have had to pay if you'd been booking in advance for the sailing they actually provided (on the day you booked for the last minute sailing) rather than the cancelled sailing which you've paid an obscenely extra amount for?.... If not the IOMGovt should bring in some new consumer protection laws for people using the con racket....
  6. The Con Racket want £80+ for a footpassenger return Lpl to IOM - how can these pirates justify that when you can't even rely on their services!!??!!!....
  7. I guess very few people have picked up on his clanger....... Or perhaps the Douglas workshop staff really have got the Mannin out of the museum and overhauled it in a few weeks??.... Or did Mr Crookall mean 1910????......
  8. Not really I see no reason to stop running an event just cos a few people prang themselves every year (as long as they're not on open roads crashing into 'innocent' parties). National Organ Donor festival is the slang used in certain quarters with a greater proximity to the carnage than I would think you have.....
  9. Sad to say, but that is true of Castletown. It's such a pretty place (even if they have started building all over Scarlett Farm now) but completely dead. When I was growing up there it was a very busy and bustling little town. A different world. Infact, the south of the Island is by far the prettiest part. The most godforsaken place on the Island has to be Jurby - (zombie territory). That only applies to the Bretney. Sadly the rest of Jurby has been tarnished with it's reputation and the prison hasn't exactly helped. Jurby, the place where you can buy your own semi detached house with a nice garden, views of the fields and mountains (no sight of the prison at all), have peace and quiet and at a realistic price. Actually thinking about it perhaps the stigma is a good thing cos it will mean it is less likely to get built up..... Having grown up in Douglas and lived in a big city too, I wouldn't want to move back to the smoke again!!..... As for dank and grey in Jurby it always seems to be sunny when I am there.....
  10. Perhaps they could run a national organ donors festival alongside the TT and MGP?...
  11. The twerp who produced that website (along with many others of their ilk) forgets that historically the Scots came from Ulster before they occupied the lands of the Picts and the Strathclyde British to form the Sea Kingdom of Dalriada (Ulster, Western Isles, Argyll and Man).... And many of those oh so Irish people with names like Fitzgerald and Fitzjames or Fitzpatrick who complain about the "Scottish Squatters" conveniently ignore the fact that they themselves are descended from a bunch of Normans.... Ironic isn't it......
  12. Ah Heysham port security what a delight. I once got told by a dim security attendant that I had to hand in my bag as it was too big to carried as hand baggage - despite me just having measured it to make sure it fitted within the framework right in front of her eyes. As her powers of observation were somewhat limited I put the bag back into the frame to prove it fitted whilst quoting the text from the sign above it.... then swinging it back onto my shoulder walked off onto the boat with the bag. Needless to say she had little else to say after that....
  13. Airport Security at Liverpool is the worst possible example of airport security. If they can make an issue about anything from nothing without the slightest provocation or valid reason then they will. This includes nosing through people's diarys and wallets. Ronaldsway is nowhere near as bad. The simple fact remains that many of these individuals would be incapable of holding down a proper job. Many have failed to get into the police or armed forces and so therefore think that somehow being a security officer at an airport makes them some sort of super hero. There should really be an independant regulatory body through which complaints about innappropriate behaviour of security personell could be directed. Furthermore they should have to have a professional qualification and make a subscription to regulatory body (similar to the requirement expected of many healthcare professionals or teachers). Their code of conduct should expect them to act with integrity, impartiality, and be polite and courteous at all times. Any conduct differing from this should enable a complaint to be made and unless found not to be at fault then the practitioner should be struck off. Whilst Airport securities may well justify their existance on the basis of a limited number of terrorist actions on board planes in the past, the simple fact remains that there is a much higher probability of an unpleasant encounter and harrasment from a member of the 'security' staff at ports (particularily Liverpool) than there is of an incident even occuring or being prevented. The fear of terrorist action offers no real justification for rudeness, pettieness and abuse of the priveliges which the role brings with it. To shut the potential complainent up with the threats of blocking their travel is an unnacceptable imposition upon their freedom of speech. Perhaps it's time for a campaign to curtail the powers of these self important people and introduce a true regulatory body to sort them out when they're out of order?...
  14. So Tynwald drags most of the manx population down the their level again...
  15. You presumed wrongly then.... A fair amount who have previously worked for the Department of Health don't get offered the chance to train on the Island and then immediately get offered several places across.... Is it really right that they're denied the opportunity to develop in their chosen career just because they don't meet the interview criteria of a very small institution when several other institutions across consider them to be acceptable applicants on the grounds of interview, experience and references?..... As I've already identified if you decide that Manx Students are only entitled to support if they study locally for professional qualifications then you're basically stunting the development of their careers and limiting the number of places they can apply for as compared to UK students- which (whilst I appreciate you and others may disagree) is why I consider the denial of proper funding to undertake professional courses across as a more serious matter. Particularily when the Island doesn't offer training in some areas such as for example Paediatric or Learning disability branch nursing, Occupational or Physio Therapy, Medicine, etc etc) .... Manx Crabs at its finest ("you either get on here boy or you don't get on at all - if you don't like that there's a boat in the morning and I don't care if you're Manx either.....") Furthermore given that the Island sends many of its patients across to be treated in UK hospitals is it not desirable that some Island based hospital staff have experience of working with the staff across in the UK and have experience of the kind of procedures practiced across?....
  16. Right the official position is that Manx Students are eligable for the places on NHS based training course (so getting around the official position of only UK citizens being eligable for the NHS commissioned places). However you have to approach your local authority for funding. In the Isle of Man's Case this is the Department of Education (the Department of Health doesn't even want to know about students studying for example nursing across in the UK - this applies as much for Paediatric and Learning disability Nurses and Midwives for which there is no option to train on the Island as much as Adult and Mental health for which there are limited opportunities....supposedly once every other year for Mental Health). The Department of Education therefore treats it's students taking health related subjects as the same as any other student). Therefore it uses excuses such as age and parents means to avoid paying a maintenance bursary to Nursing students (which they should recieve regardless of previous studies or age if they were treated the same as for example Keyll Darree Students or UK resident Nursing students). For any nursing student (as with teaching) to be eligable for proper support from the UK they have to prove that they are resident in the UK. Whilst the time they have spent in the Isle of Man will count towards their eligability, they must be able to prove that they have not just moved to the UK to undertake their degree - ie they have the burden of proof to show that they have come there to become a settled working individual, not just to do their degree (from memory they need a UK address for 6 months prior to starting their studies (which is OK if Mummy and Daddy have the funds to buy you a house or if you can move across and get a job prior to starting your studies but otherwise you're pretty much stuffed). There was an IOM Nursing student at university who had been resident in the UK for some two years but still had problems getting proper funding - they were told that they had to get it from the IOM, but the IOM govt didn't want to know either... Eventually it was resolved and they were able to prove they were a UK resident who had properly settled and who had just started a Nursing degree and would not be returning to the Island post graduation... So the end result is that Manx Nursing students and other students taking similar courses which should have a maintenance grant and all fees covered get caught between the devil and the deep blue sea.....
  17. The value of such things was appreciated long before university education became widespread. To attempt to suggest that it was not is either ignorant or deluded. No I fully recognised that you would disagree with the classification of "Luxury" degrees. My point is that Luxury is those things which are nice to have but which have little benefit to anyone else other than the individual. Therefore as the individual has chosen to develop themselves with little intention of benefitting society as a whole they should be prepared to do this at their own expense. If on the other hand they intend to return and freely disappate their knowledge to help everyone in society benefit themselves and develop then that's another matter..... That's the way the world has gone. The reason Nursing moved towards a degree based subject was for a number of reasons - for example putting nurses on an equal footing with other members of the Multidisciplinary team, giving them the research and critical thinking skills to ensure they used sound evidence based practice for the benefit of their patients - pushing forward better treatments and objectively analysing to see that they really were beneficial for their patients, not just doing things the way they'd always been done... Fine, we'll beg to differ. I think in the current climate ultimately the cold reality of economics will make the decisions.... I think you underestimate people who undergo training for a professional degree. Many of them have just as much vision, drive and depth and breadth of knowledge as someone who's done Media Studies. This is precisely what I mean about you appearing to have deluded perceptions of yourself as some sort of intellectual revolutionary. Whereas you will probably just drop into the pattern once you've graduated without applying your skills. Wrong, you fail to realise that society does value such things, but for most people it is something they are passionately into but choose not to go to an institution so they can have some letters after their name.... You haven't really met many people then. Funnily enough I've met people from all spheres and they all have their own passions outside of work. Perhaps you were just unable to engauge them in conversation or automatically assumed that they wouldn't be interested in such things so you didn't deign yourself to speak to them.... You sister had to go to university to do that?.... My grandfather could do that and he was down a coal mine pushing trucks as a boy and then in the army at 16 before getting out of a Japanese Prison Camp aged 33 and then coming home to work as a postman. If he was still alive he could probably run rings round you and your sister when it comes to depth and breadth of knowledge. To you, that is fair enough. I see the value of both and am interested in History. However I would still argue that they don't really benefit society as a whole, unless the individual who studies them is prepared to dissapate this knowledge freely for all the recieve. Which is what I said before about industry providing funding for degrees which it will benefit from. The increase in university education has only been possible due to a decent economy and now times are harder... Whilst having a well cultured diverse interesting society is important it's not really necessary to go to university for that. Diversity, Culture began evolving long before university education was common. An what benefit will you La Dolce Vita have to promoting culture, diversity and creating an interesting society and community? Other than posting on an internet forum...... It is not necessary to study philosophy to understand Ethics. And indeed there are a good number of professional degrees which bring the issues of ethics home far harder than philosophy.....
  18. A thought occurs! Do spoiled rich kids who've been sent to all the right schools and universities really require a modern equivalent? Do they no longer exist then? Levity aside: StuartT, I'm guessing you know as little about La Dolce Vita as he does about you, so is any of this really necessary? True, I just find that LDV often acts as if somehow by studying what he is studying somehow makes him more intelligent and more enlightened than the masses. I imagine him being some sort of Rick character from the young ones. I could be totally wrong never having met him, but that's certainly the image he projects. You are correct, I haven't studied a philosophy degree. I do have an aquaintance who is a philosopy lecturer and occasionally read her posts on fb. They seem little more than the self musings many of us make, albeit with a few intellectual references thrown in. Interesting, her musings may well be, but however are they really that beneficial to society as a whole? Even though it is clear you are intelligent and research your posts well are you in a position to speak as to what the requirements of every degree is? If we apply the logic that one must have studied something to compare its worth to another subject then no-one could really comment - although those people who have done two or three different degrees may well be able to comment on what they think which of the the degrees they have studied is of most benefit. Therefore the only yardstick available which is commonly quantifiable is the degree of benefit the degree has to society as a whole, and the consequences of being unable to take the degree to the individual. I'd argue that if an individual can prove that they're going to benefit society with their studies then yes it is worth society investing in them. If however they're going away to study as some sort of personal hobby, which they will not use to benefit society as a whole (which lets face it how many Philosopy graduates actually go about sharing what they're learnt freely to society as a whole?). As compared to Dr's and Nurses, Allied Healthcare Professions and Social Workers looking after the vulnerable and in need? Fair point about access to a library and lecturers. However the OU seems to be able to offer this. I am sure with modern technology such as Skype, emails, athens and other online references it should be able to offer better access to degrees on Island. Most universities use a lot of online content now. Hence why I suggested some sort of access through the Isle of Man college. You could arrange contact time with lecturers from affiliated institutions. The simple fact remains that some degrees require far more than others in terms of the hours spent upon them. Professional degrees tend to be more demanding by the dint of the fact that they require more placement time combined with the need to fit in the academic. Their terms are often far longer with less time off and far less scope for part time employment. Therefore their students do require more support. Something which at the moment the Isle of Man Government has failed to do properly. I don't dismiss the worth of other subjects, I appreciate their worth and they are of value and interest to me too. However the government is determined to makes cuts which will make it unrealistic to study many degrees and I am trying to suggest a way in which the government properly funds those which it makes the most benefit of (rather than underfunding them and then benefitting from their graduates). At the moment no-one else has come up with an alternative other than to raise taxes or stay the same - which will mean that some students continue to be underfunded for the degrees they do.
  19. I don't agree, how is forcing people to come back practical? Wasting people away in public service pseudo-jobs created just for a role for them. And how to enforce it? Combined with the government's drive to cull numbers through natural wastage, which hurts young job-seekers disproportionately. I also don't agree with the worth you placed on relative subjects. There is no reason any of the degrees you mentioned couldn't be obtained through distance learning (supplemented with the occasional lab), especially at undergraduate level; and what is there to substantiate that vocational/science degrees add any more to our society than any other degrees? Again, I think this demonstrates the need for proper assessment of what we want from higher education and what we're getting out of it, including the diversity of subjects. How many engineers actually go into engineering? Should they be pushed to do business or accounting instead? Personally I think the increased quality of life and opportunity it brings is reason enough for not discriminating between subjects; why push someone into something they're not interested in just so they can get funding? Actually no, you can't do a nursing degree distance, nor can you do medicine distance. And the impact of an individual being unable to undertake professional training in those subjects is significantly more for an individual than being unable to do media studies. Effectively you've stifled their career before it's even started.....
  20. La Dolce Vita, what you fail to realise if, if you are that intelligent you don't have to go to university to study such subjects as Media Studies and Philosophy. There are people who have never been to university in their lives who could run rings rounds graduates from some subjects (often such people end up getting an honorary degree). You also show that despite your education you struggle to have a clear comprehension of what I have said. I am suggesting that if an individual wishes to study a luxury degree then they should do so with the help of an interest free government loan. If they put a sufficient business case (which should be easy for somone with as much of an intelligence which you suggest is necessary to study Media Studies) for how their degree can benefit the Island and are prepared to contractually bind themselves for the consideration of proper funding, then maybe they could be elligible for other funding. It workes for UK students, so why not here?..... On the other hand other professionally based subjects training for key worker rolls have an economic value and could potentially be far more detrimental to an individual if they are not facilitated to undertake such training stifling their careers and leading to a shortage of such trained persons in the Island. Furthermore as a fair amount of workplacement in addition to specialist study into the subject requires a lot more of the individuals time than in a media studies degree, they need some sort of renumeration for their workplacements. At the moment the IOM Govt wriggles out of this (eg with Nursing Students studying across) which is essentially espousing a form of indentured service (ie work for nothing in the NHS and you might graduate with a professional qualification). As for who has time to learn about the Arts, History, Philosophy etc in their spare time, then you're clearly not that committed to your chosen subject if you take this view. This just reveals you to be a pretentious psuedointellectual who wants a badge of having a degree in some subject that sounds fancy but has FA application in the world. In short you want to be the modern equivalent of a spoiled rich kid whose been sent to all the right schools and universities on the back of someone elses money. You will never know what it is to work 30+hours in a demanding sector, spend even more time in university at lectures, then go home and study even more so you have the knowledge to start your assignments which will require even more of your time. Therefore illustrating my case that those who undertake professional training deserve better funding than those who take luxury degrees because they want to think that they're somehow more intelligent than the masses.
  21. What if they wanted to return but there was no job for them suited to their degree? Would they have to work at MacDonalds for 5 years before they could escape to find work relevant to their degree across (or wordwide for that matter)? Well they could always elect to pay up the money for their education, then there would be no issue. Golden Handcuffs wouldn't apply to those who have taken a loan to study their degree similar to UK students, but for those going into professions which the Island requires and who can't advance in their professions without those subjects, who have no option (or haven't been given the opportunity to develop in the limited number of opportunities on Island) and who should be funded properly including a maintenance grant. I split degrees into three catagories in my suggestions, I would sugges the first two catagories should have golden handcuffs, the third (luxury) catagory should only have golden handcuffs if they've been funded by the government for a reason (ie if they've taken a degree in order to teach it on Island). Though it does beg the question if our hypothetical graduate's only option was working in McDonalds post graduation then how good was their degree in the first place (in two senses, what they elected to study and the result they got)???.....
  22. The inevitable result would be that such courses would not be taken up or only taken up by a few. That would be a big problem for the intelligence and culture of society. If anything, we need more people studying philosophy, history, english, and the arts than less. Why should they? Because one of the excuses for cutting university funding is that people study across at the Islands expense and then don't return to the Island - it's a popular reason used as I know it was one that frequently came up when I was argueing for better funding to go to university. At the end of the day it works to the graduates advantage too as they are guaranteed some sort of work at the end of it and the government has an interest in making sure they get into island employment as otherwise the obligation could be written off. Combined with a deferrment option Golden Handcuffs sounds like a fair compromise. As regards the level of intelligence involved in studying subjects such as Philosophy or Media Studies, I think that's a huge ASSumption to think that these subjects somehow involve more intelligence than subjects such as Law, Medicine, Engineering, Nursing, Social Work, or other professional qualifications. Plus they are a lot easier to study distance as you don't have the issue of work placements. And at the end of the day graduates from professional degrees are going to be a lot more benefit to the Island than those from Luxury Degrees. There may be space for a few Philosophy, Media Studies or Art History Graduates if we ever get this Manx University, but nowhere near the number of professionals needed from Health, Education, Law, Engineering or Social Work.
  23. Why, is his offer still open??.....
  24. I seem to remember having seen pictures of (a) plane(s) parked on Douglas beach somewhere. Trying to recall where though. I can also remember travelling on a hovercraft from Douglas Bay doing a lap around a vessel (trying to recall if it was Britannia or a military vessel) some time in the 80's.
  25. It seems clear that we can't get rid of MHK's salary's as then it would return to the days when the only members of the Keys were rich men with independant finances. The solution to this seems simple......... make MHK's pay means tested - those with more get less, those with less get a living wage.
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