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Zarley

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Zarley last won the day on May 16

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About Zarley

  • Birthday 11/04/1962

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  1. Would the private sector even want to employ the government employees who most need to be shown the door? I suppose the pubs might take some on. Do we need more shelf stackers in Tesco or Shoprite?
  2. Since when is DoI supplying missiles to Ukraine? And is that some sort of new-fangled missile launcher disguised as a crane in the background?
  3. Never going to happen (although it should). In his mind he's the injured party, not Dr Ranson or anyone else. He probably hugs his MBE close to his heart as he cries himself to sleep each night. Diddums. 🤢
  4. I've had an adverse event due to the vaccine and I reported it to the yellow card system on the advice of an audiologist at Nobles. I've had tinnitus for about ten years now, due to medicine I take for an underlying condition. This has been yellow carded by the prescribing specialist. When I had my first vaccine, the tinnitus became noticeably worse, and worse again with the 2nd and booster shots. My GP referred me to the audiology department at Nobles. The audiologist confirmed partial hearing loss and although they can't really confirm tinnitus, she said this probably contributed to the hearing loss. She told me that tinnitus was a widely accepted adverse event from the covid vaccines amongst audiologist and suggested I complete a yellow card report, which I did. I had covid (omnicron) at the end of March, and the tinnitus got worse yet again, although thankfully it has subsided more-or-less to pre-covid illness levels in the past few weeks or so, unless I'm tired or stressed. Then it's off the freaking charts. Would I have had the vaccine if I'd known my tinnitus would worsen? Absofreakinglutely. I was quite unwell during my bout with covid (yes, probably due in part to my underlying condition, probably due in part to just bad luck) and I dread to think how ill I may have become if I were unvaccinated. Everyone has to weigh up the cost/benefit situation for themselves when taking any medication or vaccine. None of them are perfect or side effect free. If I'd ceased taking the meds which first gave me tinnitus, chances are I'd no longer be here to tell the story. Same thing for the covid vaccine. I've learned* how to live with tinnitus. At least I'm here to do so. *still learning!
  5. If he didn't know what was going on, he should have. If he wasn't so far up his own backside he would/should have noticed something was amiss and got to the bottom of it. No matter how you look at it, he has to go. I have absolutely no confidence in his abilities as a minister and I doubt many others do. It's frightening that he's in charge of the purse-strings at a time of economic crisis. That fact that Alf hasn't got rid also leaves me with no confidence in the Chief Minister. What a shit-show. Astonishing indeed.
  6. Sod that. He's shown himself to be an untrustworthy liar and an incompetent buffoon. He should not be permitted near any public office, nor should he get paid for any consultancy work or project management in the public sector. He represents all that is wrong and toxic in IOMG as well as the civil service. He needs to go, full stop.
  7. Ashford should not only resign from the treasury, he should resign as an MHK so a bye election can be called. Without delay. He should then hang his head in shame and never hold any public office ever again, nor any other position in the public arena. He's a national embarrassment.
  8. Good to know - and I hope you're right.
  9. I think they should continue to provide them for free - or very low cost at least. One family member has cancer and I'm vulnerable as well. Our family would find it much more difficult to keep each other safe if we were unable to monitor our health via these tests. My daughter currently has covid - she caught it while teaching. She's not out and about, she's at home and quite unwell. She doesn't want to be off work; being a supply teacher she's basically on a zero-hours contract. She's fully vaxxed and boosted, young and healthy. She doesn't have "typical" headcold covid symptoms, she's extremely fatigued with bad joint pain. If covid tests weren't readily available it would have been easy to assume she was suffering from something else and because it's not presenting as a respiratory illness, we probably wouldn't think it was very contagious. While if I or the cancer patient in the family may only have a "mild" case if we catch it, you never know and I don't particularly want to find out if it can be helped. We're a close family, constantly in and out of each other's homes, so it's important we know the score. I'm NOT advocating the return or continuation of covid restrictions. However there's no good reason for removing the ability to test for those of us wishing to keep close, vulnerable family members safe. If you feel you no longer need to test, then don't test. Just don't remove the ability (or make it financially burdensome) to test from those of us who have genuine reasons to continue. TL:DR not testing will have absolutely no effect on how many people have covid, and some of us need to know if family members have it or not.
  10. Don't know if drivelling pains him, but it certainly pains his readers.
  11. You missed out the rest of the article. Announcing his motion in Tynwald, Mr Mercer said that there had been ’significant changes to the regulatory and economic environment [of the offshore energy industry] that may have rendered parts or even the whole strategy out of step with current understanding’. ’I’m concerned that to rely on this strategy as it is now without review or reflection of its content is to rely on out of date information,’ he added. Among the reasons a review was needed included the ’greater public awareness’ about how energy could be generated in a ’post-carbon fuelled world’, and the fact that the report focused on exportation of energy from the island, rather than the importation of wind electricity, for example. Another example he gave of a changed factor was that the costs of offshore wind farms had since fallen. One politician who voted against a review of the report was Middle MHK Stu Peters, who did not want to see ’anything done to prevent a commercial operator from extracting gas if it’s available as expected for the benefit of the people and the economy of the Isle of Man’. He said that he did not believe the science on climate change ’was settled’, and argued that the island’s energy security should be prioritised. Among the MHKs that spoke out in support of holding a review was Garff’s Daphne Caine, who cited fears that the 2014 strategy ’encouraged and led to offshore prospecting for fossil fuels, which viewed from today’s perspective is a more difficult situation’. And MLC Paul Craine supported by saying that it was ’a decade too late’ to be extracting natural gas as the world should be trying to eliminate fossil fuels.
  12. Zarley

    A Plan

    Is that a barefoot-in-the-kitchen reference?
  13. Obviously shortening the work-week to save money. ETA why is this in the covid thread?
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