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BallaDoc

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About BallaDoc

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  1. BallaDoc

    Mysterious runes on standing stones

    No, I think that's correct, the top number is the pipe size in millimetres and the bottom number is the distance in metres
  2. BallaDoc

    Mysterious runes on standing stones

    Answering my own question, I think "D" could be "drinking water" and "DV" could therefore be "Drinking water valve"
  3. BallaDoc

    Mysterious runes on standing stones

    Thanks for that illuminating reply LightBulb. So what does "DV" mean (colour blue, not shown in the picture)?
  4. While out walking on the old railway track between Ballaugh and Kirk Michael, I came across these stones with mysterious markings on, possibly the graves of Viking warriors, or maybe something to do with Manx Utilities: Can anyone tell me what the markings mean? A bit of Internet searching suggests that these relate to buried pipes and cables, the top number is the diameter of pipe in millimetres, and the bottom number is how many metres away from the marker the pipe is, but what do the big letters and the colours mean? There are also markers with a blue "DV" on.
  5. BallaDoc

    E-gaming is a sector we can be proud of, says Quayle

    The increase in the production of spoons and specific widgets, is clearly finite. Growth per se is clearly also finite, being the sum total of a number of finite things produced within a finite system (this planet). The only thing which can be produced in infinite quantities is money, but an infinite amount of money isn't the same as an infinite amount of real wealth. See, for example, Germany in 1924, Zimbabwe in 2008 and Venezuela at the present time. Politicians and economists who promise that we can have infinite "growth" are deluding themselves, and us.
  6. BallaDoc

    E-gaming is a sector we can be proud of, says Quayle

    My curiosity has got the better of me and I have sent an email inquiry to the Gambling Supervision Commission about what the "gaming yield" is, or ought to be. I'll post any reply I get here.
  7. BallaDoc

    E-gaming is a sector we can be proud of, says Quayle

    Right. And the transaction charge is...? I've done a Google search for "Poker Stars transaction charge" and I'm still drawing a blank. Perhaps Mr Quayle would know?
  8. BallaDoc

    E-gaming is a sector we can be proud of, says Quayle

    Really? I would be genuinely interested to know what the PokerStars business model is, and in particular, the gaming yield. I spent quite a long time trying to find out what the percentage profit skimmed from the punters by the gaming companies is. I did multiple Google searches for phrases like "gaming profits", "gaming overheads" "gaming revenue" etc. but came up empty handed each time. I eventually found this under "gaming yield": https://mannbenham.com/gaming-law-on-the-isle-of-man-chapter/ which is sort of what I was looking for, and mentions a figure of 15%, but I don't know if Poker Stars' profits are higher or lower than this. For an industry which makes up 28% of the economy, it's surprisingly difficult to find out basic information about it.
  9. BallaDoc

    E-gaming is a sector we can be proud of, says Quayle

    Wealth ultimately has to be based on real things. I agree that the City makes a lot of money pushing pixels around computer screens, but at the bottom of that there has to be real stuff; real coffee, sugar, oil or whatever the pixels represent, otherwise the pixels and the activities associated with them are meaningless. Similarly with Airbnb and Uber: somewhere behind the screens there has to be real activity in the real world, people cleaning rooms, making beds, filling cars with petrol, and so on. I worry about an economy which is based on little more than sleight of hand, or skimming off profits from the people doing the real work, because it seems to be that it's vulnerable to going away if circumstances change.
  10. BallaDoc

    E-gaming is a sector we can be proud of, says Quayle

    Some say that gambling's a sin But I'll bet you 15 to 1 That gambling has been in this world Since horses and greyhounds could run Seven Deadly Sins, The Dubliners But there wasn't anything in the song about 28% of the economy being based on it
  11. http://www.iomtoday.co.im/article.cfm?id=43051&headline=eGaming is a sector we can be proud of says Quayle&sectionIs=NEWS&searchyear=2018 Ye Gods. Am I the only one who has a problem with this? As I understand it, the basics of e-gaming are these: you take a pound from each of 100 people on the basis that they all have a chance of winning a lot of money. 99 out the 100 get nothing. The remaining one gets 85 pounds. The organisers get 15 pounds (assuming a gaming yield of 15%, which I believe is the industry standard). No physical goods are produced. And this, according to Quayle, makes up 28% of our economy, and that's a good thing.
  12. BallaDoc

    Population growth challenged.

    I think what Alastair Kneale was saying was, what is the intended purpose of the population growth, and what is the target - both reasonable questions which are rarely asked. If its intended purpose is to generate money to pay for services for older / retired people, it's a Ponzi scheme, because eventually today's workers will become old and retired themselves, and need a platform of even more younger workers to support them, and so on. Wash, rinse and repeat. That cycle can't go on indefinitely. On the other hand, if the purpose of population growth is to make the island more like Liverpool, with more cinemas, nightclubs, shops, neurosurgery units and so on, then what's the point of that? - a lot of people come to the island precisely because it's not like Liverpool.
  13. BallaDoc

    The next MMR?

    Blimey, it's like an anti-vaxxers convention in here... OK, so I tried to visit that "Get the facts" website at http://bit.ly/ShotOfPrevention/HPV, but there were no facts to be had there because the link doesn't work. Not a very confidence inspiring start. At least the WHO website works. If, hypothetically, the link had worked and led me to some actual information, what I would have been looking for is not just claims on a "believe it or not" basis but links to research papers. Here is a link to the Cancer Research UK website (which works): https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/causes-of-cancer/infections-hpv-and-cancer/hpv-and-cancer and if you scroll down to the bottom there is a link called "Find a clinical trial" which is an example of the kind of research which leads people to conclude that these vaccines are safe and effective.
  14. BallaDoc

    The next MMR?

    According to the World Health Organisation, it is, in effect, a public health risk and a communicable disease: "Cervical cancer is caused by sexually acquired infection with certain types of HPV. Two HPV types (16 and 18) cause 70% of cervical cancers and precancerous cervical lesions." The rationale behind vaccinating schoolkids is that the vaccine is most effective if it's administered before the onset of sexual activity.
  15. BallaDoc

    The next MMR?

    Hang on, that seems to be 100% dodgy arithmetic. If you have a 50% chance of catching something fatal without the vaccine, but a 25% chance of catching it with the vaccine, you have just saved the lives of 25% of the population by vaccinating, even though the disease isn't 100% fatal and the vaccine doesn't confer 100% protection...
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