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The Islands first fixed speed camera will be in operation before TT week, the first of many being installed arround the Island will be located on the approach to Ballaugh Bridge. :angry:

 

That has been doing the rounds all week.

 

If true why put it in the most stupid place imaginable? There was one fatality there last year, but that wouldn't have happened if it was not TT week making the event not the speed the problem, but more to the point what is the point of putting a camera up and flashing a few bikers on the approach to Ballaugh Bridge. They'll all be comeovers here for TT lining up to do the "jump" as they always do, so they won't even be able to endorse their licenses - proof that what it is is a big cashpoint installed to collect revenue at one of the most popular points of the course.

 

It won't do anything other than raise cash. In fact I bet many will take it as a challenge to see how much they get clocked at. In the end it'll only be a few quid they have to cough up. They won't care, and they'll walk away with a clean license.

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As one of the key arguments of SID and other 'Anti-limit' groups is that current limits are not enforced, I guess they will be welcoming the introduction of these cameras, no?

 

I would think that, as long as the speed limits are sensible and reasonable - and in appropriate places - they probably will.

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Where they've made the mistake is that they've situated these pilot cameras in places that are going to be huge revenue generators, or rather that's how they would be perceived.

 

Put them outside schools and homezones and show the public that they're being used to reduce speeds in public risk areas and once people are on board with the principle you can roll them out to more remote locations.

 

I support cameras in principle, but they've made a serious gaffe in their choice of location.

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Where they've made the mistake is that they've situated these pilot cameras in places that are going to be huge revenue generators, or rather that's how they would be perceived.

 

Put them outside schools and homezones and show the public that they're being used to reduce speeds in public risk areas and once people are on board with the principle you can roll them out to more remote locations.

 

I support cameras in principle, but they've made a serious gaffe in their choice of location.

 

I'd second that.

 

Speed cameras are quite expensive to purchase and to be honest I'd rather they paid for three extra traffic police.

 

The traffic police are a more visible deterrent, catch more than just speeding and can move from one place to another.

 

I think that pulling a visiting biker up, giving them a good talking too and hitting them with a big fine within a couple of days is more likely to encourage safer driving on the island than the biker getting home after the holiday and a week later finding out that they were booked for speeding.

 

And what about our continental visitors ? How many of their fines will we ever see the money for ?

 

It is difficult to see how this will improve safety.

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They won't care, and they'll walk away with a clean license.

 

Incidentally, I just noticed this. You do know there's a reciprocal agreement now with the UK DVLA and offences committed on either side of the water will result in points on the appropriate licence?

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They won't care, and they'll walk away with a clean license.

 

Incidentally, I just noticed this. You do know there's a reciprocal agreement now with the UK DVLA and offences committed on either side of the water will result in points on the appropriate licence?

 

When I read the wording of this (a while back) it seemed to me that only a ban in reciprocated.

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I stand to be corrected if that is the case. Anyone confirm/deny?

 

Since 23 May 2005 mutual recognition of driving disqualifications between Great Britain and Northern Ireland was extended to include the Isle of Man.

 

This means that drivers who are disqualified from holding a driving licence in GB/NI on or after 23 May 2005 will also be disqualified from driving, holding or obtaining a driving licence in the Isle of Man. Similarly, if a court in the Isle of Man disqualifies a driver from driving they will also be disqualified from driving in GB/NI until the disqualification has ended.

Mutual recognition between GB/NI and IoM will only be in relation to driving disqualifications. The New Drivers Act and fixed penalties will not be included.

 

Source - DVLA

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