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girl89

What Do You Think Of University?

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I do remember a graduate entry coming to the branch of a bank I worked in, presumably he was aged about 22 or 23. As a graduate entry he was fast-tracked and worked in the branch for about 6 months before moving to the area director's office.

 

Last I heard was that he was the Small Business Centre manager in a branch in Wales aged about 24 or 25 - I'm sure all the small business owners were happy to be advised how to run their businesses by a whipper-snapper :D

 

I didn't go to university (heck I gave up A-levels before Easter of my first year), and even though I thought about it up to my mid 20s, I would only have gone if I was passionate about a course - I wouldn't go just to have gone to university.

 

The scary bit might be if the UK ends up like the USA, where I've seen jobs requiring a BA or equivalent that in no way, shape or form would require a degree in the UK at the time, just relevant experience at the most. Then again, I do tend to play my own experience and skills down a lot, so it may just be the way I look at things.

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Ok, hear me out here. I left school at 16, had my first child at 19, a second one at 22 and at that time had 11 GSCE's to my name. I decided to make a positive out of a huge negative, and enrolled myself at the OU. I now have a degreee (BSc fwiw) in 'The Applied Psychology Of Challenging Behaviour And Learning Disability'

 

I cant find that particular BSc qualification in the OU list of courses and qualifications. Could you point it out for us ?

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I went to Uni at 25 years old. It was the best decision I have ever made, however, my degree was relevant to my career allowing me to enjoy myself for 3 years, gain a relevant qualification and make a flying re-start to my working life.

 

Highly recommended for anyone unhappy in their current job

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I know I may be new to this forum but I study Media and Popular Culture and will graduate this year and my course is far harder than many of my friends here. Through media studies you have to study Psychology, Sociology, Politics, Statistics, Linguistics as well as what everyone thinks we only study TV and Films. Also as the media is THEmost influentual tool within society now, don't you think is does deserve to be studied!

As well as a lot of theory and research we are also trained in vocational skills to do with the media industry if we so wish to follow that strand. I think that courses like mine are far better in the long run becuase they give you experience in many different areas and so give you more choice for careers in the long run.

And for those who think 'mickey mouse' degrees are easy or a waste of governement money I have 12 hours of lectures a week, I work a part-time job of 16 hours a week (to fund my degree) as well as having to do 20 hours of private study; As well a having to write 5 essays so far this term, 2 exams and work towards a 10,000 word dissertation.

I think anyone that chooses to go to university doesn't make the decision lightly and should be congratulated for doing so!

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I think anyone that chooses to go to university doesn't make the decision lightly and should be congratulated for doing so!

 

I agree. If the prospective student is a young person you might also spare a thought for Mum or Dad who have probably signed themselves up for 3 more years of sacrifice.

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I have 12 hours of lectures a week, I work a part-time job of 16 hours a week (to fund my degree) as well as having to do 20 hours of private study; As well a having to write 5 essays so far this term, 2 exams and work towards a 10,000 word dissertation.

 

Wow you don't know how lucky you are!

I have 12 hours of lectures one day a week, I work full time (40 hours a week) and have had 30 essays so far this term and have to spend more than 20 hours a week studying. Oh and to top it all off I've got to write a 20,000 word dissertation.

 

Do you see me moaning B)

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I have 12 hours of lectures a week, I work a part-time job of 16 hours a week (to fund my degree) as well as having to do 20 hours of private study; As well a having to write 5 essays so far this term, 2 exams and work towards a 10,000 word dissertation.

 

Wow you don't know how lucky you are!

I have 12 hours of lectures one day a week, I work full time (40 hours a week) and have had 30 essays so far this term and have to spend more than 20 hours a week studying. Oh and to top it all off I've got to write a 20,000 word dissertation.

 

Do you see me moaning B)

 

I really wasn't meaning to moan if that was how it came across I apologise, I was just tryin to show that a 'mickey mouse' degree like media isn't all watching films etc. . .It's a lot of hard work as all degrees are.

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I really wasn't meaning to moan if that was how it came across I apologise, I was just tryin to show that a 'mickey mouse' degree like media isn't all watching films etc. . .It's a lot of hard work as all degrees are.

 

Heh, I know ;)

 

Absolutely no need to apologise.

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Just thought I would add that I left school (Balla) in 1976/7 and none of my classmates went onto uni.... infact I don't remember any of my year going to Uni and we didn't even have the Tech college that was near Glencrutchery at that time.....by what I remember we all went out into the real world and just got jobs.

That's odd MM as I left school in 1976 and went on to the Tech (College of FE) to do an OND. It was newish, but was definitely around in the mid 70's. Also, I left St Ninians, it was still the split school system then (up to 3rd form in Balla, 4th and 5th in St Ninians or Park Road), when did it change so that you went through Balla?

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Ok, hear me out here. I left school at 16, had my first child at 19, a second one at 22 and at that time had 11 GSCE's to my name. I decided to make a positive out of a huge negative, and enrolled myself at the OU. I now have a degreee (BSc fwiw) in 'The Applied Psychology Of Challenging Behaviour And Learning Disability'

 

I cant find that particular BSc qualification in the OU list of courses and qualifications. Could you point it out for us ?

 

You are quite correct Lonewolf, it isn't there. I started out at OU, and gained 240 points in undergraduate studies in Social Sciences. As I hadn't furthered my studies from school, this gave me the opportunity to apply for

 

Tizard Centre

 

And, upon completion, and being able to APL my prior points, I was awarded said BSc. (In place of the Diploma which is 240 points and there are only 360 required for a degree). I should have explained it a little clearer, but thought it too long winded and boring!

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I have 12 hours of lectures a week, I work a part-time job of 16 hours a week (to fund my degree) as well as having to do 20 hours of private study; As well a having to write 5 essays so far this term, 2 exams and work towards a 10,000 word dissertation.

 

Wow you don't know how lucky you are!

I have 12 hours of lectures one day a week, I work full time (40 hours a week) and have had 30 essays so far this term and have to spend more than 20 hours a week studying. Oh and to top it all off I've got to write a 20,000 word dissertation.

 

 

Pah! You don't know how lucky you are.

 

When I were at uni (said in a 'Michael Palin does Lancashire' accent), I had 101 hours of lectures a week, I worked full time in 2 jobs, I had a 10 essays each day and had to spend my sleep time studying. And to top it off I had to care for newborn triplets and write a best selling novel that topped the charts for a year just to get a 2:2

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Its funny how no-one who went to Uni regrets it - its always the people who didnt go to Uni that seem to disregard it.....or try to de-value it.

 

I just think that its just individual choice and how many people do really think about the economy when making life choices. At the end of the day education in whatever form is self improvement - it gives massive confidence and could change your life.

 

The key is to realise that if you are going to educate yourself - you need to commit to life long learning.

 

I just think that in the UK the job market is so cut throat that I would hate to be here without a degree no matter in what subject. In the IOM I think that life is much easier and that you could get by quite nicely without a degree but seriously in the UK I think that if you want a decently paid job (excluding labouring or blue collar jobs etc) you need a degree or the HR will just chuck your CV in the bin. (i got the shock of my life when i tried to move out of London to Canterbury and I this was before i had my degree - I was totally unprepared for the lack of jobs and how competative the job market was, and that the wages were so bad if you didnt have the degree no matter what experience you had) this gave me a bump and I soone movd back to London and enrolled into Uni as I saw it as investing in my future in line with UK standards - essential.

 

I have a mate who is an excellent PA/Secretary but because she hasnt got a degree she finds it hard to get her foot in the door.

 

Before I did my degree I had okay jobs but would never be allowed to go for promotions as I didnt have a degree even though I knew I could do the job...I also felt very singled out when I was the only one in work who didnt have one and people would judge you on that. Every course/career path I wanted to get into required a degree as the starting point.

 

Well, in my "unqualified" career, I have interviewed hundreds of people, and employed a few. I have interviewed school leavers who have inspired me with great drive and ambition, and graduates who I doubt can walk and chew gum. For example, in the finance industry what use is a graduate who does not even understand their tax return? I know a number of recent graduates who cannot even find proper work, one of my nephews being one of them (Media studies again).

 

I have lived in several countries and never found it difficult to get work. I have been head hunted several times but only took up the option once. I have never lived in that hell hole called the UK and never wish to. However, if I did I know I would fall on my feet.

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Well, in my "unqualified" career, I have interviewed hundreds of people, and employed a few. I have interviewed school leavers who have inspired me with great drive and ambition, and graduates who I doubt can walk and chew gum. For example, in the finance industry what use is a graduate who does not even understand their tax return? I know a number of recent graduates who cannot even find proper work, one of my nephews being one of them (Media studies again).

 

000643C8-6EDD-1DB6-8AFB80BFB6FAFE6C.jpg

 

Gis a job, I can do tha, gis a job, go ead laa, gis a job.

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I have never lived in that hell hole called the UK and never wish to. However, if I did I know I would fall on my feet.

 

My, you are feeling smug and superior today! In what way do you know the UK is a hell hole without any experience of living more than say a couple of weeks for a holiday. How you can be so blinkered and supposedly be god's gift at the same time is surprising.

 

Also what's your definition of "proper work" I'd love to hear it, maybe we could coin a term "mickey mouse work"...it could be working for Disneyland or something. Surely all work is proper work, be that cleaning the streets 15 hours a day, being a Chief Executive or working for the civil services (Okay, maybe not that one the work-shy bastards ;) *).

 

* Yes I am joking civil servants...now stop posting on here and do some work :P

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Ean, I may not actually have lived in the UK, but as virtually all news media I see comes from the UK, and virtually every client I have either comes from or has a base there, and many of my relatives live there, hear about the UK, and learn about the UK from many angles inside and out. Enough so that I can form an opinion. Perhaps I am blinkered, tell me then, what is there that is good about living in the UK?

 

To me proper work is full time, gainful employment in a chosen career. The sort of work that will get you ahead in life. The sort that will get you a mortgage, privide for your family and hopefully supply you with a means for retirement, if you make it that far.

Edited by Tuna Sandwich

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