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Smoking Ban - The Isle Of Man


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Seems we have a new breed of intolerants who willingly enter smoking establishments just so they can feign coughs and make a bloody fuss!

 

If I go to a pub I wake up in the morning coughing up brown shit. No feigning - just fact.

 

I have recently visited Wales and spent an enjoyable weekend in various pubs. Guess what ? No cough.

 

No kidding.

 

Even the most fervent anti-smokers have trouble proving the effects of secondary smoking, despite the rampant current propaganda campaign.

 

Ever heard of a guy called Roy Castle ?

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Ever heard of a guy called Roy Castle ?

 

Isn't he the guy who proved that playing the trumpet and exposure to high levels of Cheryl Baker causes cancer?

 

God rest his soul. Thanks to him we live in a society free from the menace of Bucks Fizz and soothing jazz melodies.

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Smoking is just plain unpleasant - that's first and foremost why it should be banned.

 

That's in your opinion. I like it lots. I find it most agreeable.

 

I DON'T like drinking very much though - it seems to be a factor in most of the crime we see reported, and first and foremost that's why I think it should be banned.

 

See - I'm getting the hang of this "I don't enjoy it so I want to stop anyone else enjoying it" way of thinking.

 

Fear not, I'm sure it'll be next :)

 

Even the most fervent anti-smokers have trouble proving the effects of secondary smoking, despite the rampant current propaganda campaign.

 

Secondary smoke often makes me want to spew, it makes me cough and my eyes water and can often give me a headache. I know the first symptom, taken to fruition could be used as proof of the effects of secondary smoking, but forcing my vomit upon others would be most anti-social (wouldn't you say?).

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Spot on Gladys (and Churchill). Both sides need to grow up. Smokers the ban is going to happen get over it. Non Smokers stop being so blinking self righteous and preachy.

 

The fact is the ban will mean a change in lifestyle thats all. Now on a recent visit to Dublin there is both a upside and downside. Pubs yes are now smoke free, smell nicer, and are much better for food. On the downside the doorways and street nearby smell, are covered in butts, and look scruffy. Plus somehow the pubs don't feel quite right without the smokers smoke.

 

I for one am an ex smoker. I won't miss the rare occasions when my eyes water from the smoke during a particularly popular footy game on the pub tv. I won't miss the habit one of my friends who practically chain smokes when we go out, and I won't miss those who choose to smoke in pubs serving food at lunchtime. But for the vast majority of other times the smoke in the pubs never bothered me at all. Most pubs aren't as badly ventilated as they were and it is less of a problem.

 

As for the health side of it I no longer smoke so that is the big thing. I don't work in a smoking environment so the amount I inhale during the times I go out probably won't kill me (or it won't kill me any faster than the hundreds of other ways both humans and nature have thought up). The sad fact it I am probably doing more damage to myself drinking the beer than the relatively small amount of second hand smoke I suffer.

 

I do favor people giving up smoking but only because it is really bad for you, and you will feel loads better if you do. You should do so if you want to and not through prohibition (although taxing the arse off it isn't a bad thing). More effort should be spent on giving persuading people that quitting is the right choice and helping them quit. Telling people they just can't do it doesn't work for some it only entrenches their attitudes.

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I went to a club in Ireland a few months after the smoking ban came in. It stank! Of damp, feet, all those manky smells that the cigarette smoke had clearly been hiding all those years.

I wonder what Paramount will smell of next year?

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Spot on Gladys (and Churchill). Both sides need to grow up. Smokers the ban is going to happen get over it. Non Smokers stop being so blinking self righteous and preachy.

 

Couldn't agree more. As a non-smoker myself I can't understand the urge to take up the habit, but I suppose some people can't understand why I like a drink either, it's all down to choice. However, as a non-smoker who has to take tablets to ease the constriction of my airways after I have been in a smoky environment, I restrict how many times I go out in a year assessing the likely impact on my health each time. If I think it is going to be very smokey then I don't go, if not I go. Why should I have to go through this because of someone else's habit and why should I have to pay to compensate for going out?

 

This isn't just a smoking thing either, walking down streets where people are burning non-smokeless fuels on their fire have the same effect, (Pulrose and Lord street are 2 of the worst places in Douglas for this) so if we are going to be truly a non-smoking Island, then perhaps we should also invoke the clean air act and prevent non-smokeless fuels from being sold as well?

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As a youngster I got used to the smell of smoke but must admit as I have got older I have got more intolerant. Maybe cos there are now more no smoking places, maybe cos my habits have changed. I go to pubs less than I used to and often now it is a lunchtime with my family for a bite to eat.

 

My intolerance is not in respect of the health issue either for the smoker or myself as a passive smoker it is I just do not like the smell. Especially when I am eating. It is also not pleasant waking up the following morning and getting a whiff of stale fags from the smoke which got into your hair, cast of clothes etc.

 

This really struck home recently from a trip abroad recently where virtually all establishmnets allowed you to smoke. I spent a fortune on hotel cleaning just so my bag home did not reek but also after only an hour or twos wear one eveing jeans or trousers were not really ready to wear again the next mornig for the conference as they stank.

 

I think I have been very tolerant of this over the years and never made a song or dance of it. I think only once have I requsted I change seats in a restaurant as a consequences. However now the law has or will changed I would like the tolerance in my favour by the smokers reciprocated.

 

I can understand it is hard for them to adapt as nicotine is addictive and they like the smell and taste of tobacco. But they should realise that unfortunately they can not generally keep that smell and taste to themselves and many people find it deeply unpleasant. I genuinely think also many smokers do not realise this and how the smell travels and lingers. They seem to believe it something that is barely noticeable and once stubbed out the smell disappears almost immediately. I am sorry but it does not and to me when i have a drink now I find the smell as off putting as many smokers might if my six month old left one of her specials in her nappy and I kept wafting it under their noses when they had a pint and a fag.

 

There is a reasonable point here, and I have to say that when I go out say on a Friday or Saturday night, whilst I don't enjoy the smell of smoke, I can kind of put up with it as part the night out, and am, in a way, prepared to accept it goes with the territory.

 

The problem with smokers is, that isn't enough, and they will therefore happily smoke away, for example, in a more family focussed pub at lunchtime, ruining people's food and poisoning the children.

 

There perhaps could have been a compromise a few years ago, with smoking being banished from restaurants and pubs where food is served, but because the majority of smokers were so strident about their "rights" to be able to smoke wherever they damn well wanted to when they were out eating or drinking, the opinions of the non-smokers became that much more polarised as well.

 

Me and my wife had a night out earlier in the week for an excellent Chinese meal, although the later half of our main course was spoiled somewhat by four people on the table next to us all simultaneously sparking up as soon as they'd finished eating, it's this kind of total thoughtlessness and selfishness (ever notice how smokers never smoke when they're eating?) that has left smokers in the situation they are now - i.e. facing a total ban in public places.

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I went to a club in Ireland a few months after the smoking ban came in. It stank! Of damp, feet, all those manky smells that the cigarette smoke had clearly been hiding all those years.

I wonder what Paramount will smell of next year?

 

Cheap perfume and trump, most likely!

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I went to a club in Ireland a few months after the smoking ban came in. It stank! Of damp, feet, all those manky smells that the cigarette smoke had clearly been hiding all those years.

I wonder what Paramount will smell of next year?

 

Plaster, new paint and apartments probably - it'll probably shut down after the smoking ban and lose an absolute fortune because the smokers won't bother going there anymore :)

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