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Whats Life Realy Like On The Iofm


terry1956

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So, Terry, four pages before someone told you to piss off, surely a record?

From replies, you may gather we have many different opinions here. Some are valid and useful, others are spiteful and malicious. Only you can decide whether to come here to live or not, if you do I, for one, will welcome you to paradise.

If you decide not to grace us with your presence, so be it, we'll survive.

Life is what you make it here. For your perusal some local oddities;

Cows milk is 50p a pint- organic milk is 44p a pint.

It costs £10 to join a library - you get 1 free eye test a year.

Prescriptions are £3.25 - you may wait 3 years before getting an NHS dentist.

You pay an extra 5p per litre for fuel - you save £65 a year from no MOT fee.

No speed limit on certain roads - minimum fine for speeding £150 + 3 points.

A horse can shit in the middle of the road freely - dog shits and you get a fine.

No license required for a horse - dog license needed.

 

There are others, but you need to live here for a bit before you believe them.

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Hello to you all, Well there have been some nice replys and some not so nice, But that is what one expects. I was asked a good question, ie what would I bring to the IOM, I did answer that one, But may I ask what some of you add to living on the IOM, In some cases I would say not a lot, just being born in a place does not make one belong in it, Its what one adds that makes your being there worth, well being there.

I am planning to visit early next year, and thank the many who have made the offer to show myself and my partner around,

We will be off line until around mid dec as we our off to norway for the fishing. I dare say that some of you will have a dig, but that is no matter.

Thanks again for a view into some of your minds, it was interesting.

terry

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from the question "what's it like living here", I would say a pullover colder, you'll have the heating on more, a raincoat will be the usual outer garment, and get used to the wind blowing everything you plant in the garden to bits !

 

Get used to the frustration of seeing things advertised which would just be a run down the motorway but from here take a 3-day trip and a couple of overnight hotels, and that week in Florida on offer for £199 will cost you about £1000 !

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Hello to you all, Well there have been some nice replys and some not so nice, But that is what one expects. I was asked a good question, ie what would I bring to the IOM, I did answer that one, But may I ask what some of you add to living on the IOM, In some cases I would say not a lot, just being born in a place does not make one belong in it, Its what one adds that makes your being there worth, well being there.

I am planning to visit early next year, and thank the many who have made the offer to show myself and my partner around,

We will be off line until around mid dec as we our off to norway for the fishing. I dare say that some of you will have a dig, but that is no matter.

Thanks again for a view into some of your minds, it was interesting.

terry

Seeing as English is obviously not your first language you need a couple of pointers,

If asking what a place is like, it is somewhat discourteous to insult the indigenous population.

The proper use of the language is also usual.

Phrases like "just being born in a place does not make one belong in it" are not useful if you are after a peaceful coexistence

with the resident population. If that is not a criteria for belonging then what is?

Maybe you should rethink your lifestyle and do something useful elsewhere.

Lastly and for your information, the Isle of Man is not a country club you can join freely and leave at your pleasure, it is a nation state with many years of culture and history that makes it what it is. If you are not prepared to accept that it is your loss.

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Seeing as English is obviously not your first language you need a couple of pointers,

If asking what a place is like, it is somewhat discourteous to insult the indigenous population.

 

He didn't really insult it though, he suggested that in some individual cases a Manx national does no more, or perhaps even less, for the benfit of the Island's society than some who move here from other countries, which is a fair point to raise. I agree that the phrasing could appear a little snippy though.

Phrases like "just being born in a place does not make one belong in it" are not useful if you are after a peaceful coexistence

with the resident population. If that is not a criteria for belonging then what is?

 

Certainly, being born in a given country confers that country's nationality, but I suspect that's not what Terry was getting at; namely the more vague and intangible sense of belonging and being a valued part of a culture or society.

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Seeing as English is obviously not your first language you need a couple of pointers,

If asking what a place is like, it is somewhat discourteous to insult the indigenous population.

 

He didn't really insult it though, he suggested that in some individual cases a Manx national does no more, or perhaps even less, for the benfit of the Island's society than some who move here from other countries, which is a fair point to raise. I agree that the phrasing could appear a little snippy though.

Phrases like "just being born in a place does not make one belong in it" are not useful if you are after a peaceful coexistence

with the resident population. If that is not a criteria for belonging then what is?

 

Certainly, being born in a given country confers that country's nationality, but I suspect that's not what Terry was getting at; namely the more vague and intangible sense of belonging and being a valued part of a culture or society.

 

 

 

Belonging is about putting some think into the Island and not expecting to take out more than you are prepared to give. So long as the criteria for a move here isn't limited by good healthcare and low taxation, and your prepared to accept the culture and not try to turn it into the Shangri-La you've decided is so good you've got to come here you should do alright. Just remember though if you've got ideas about travel off island it'll cost you a packet to take the car away.

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Hi Terry, I know it has been mentioned that there is no MOT on the Island, but if you are wanting to bring your classic bikes over, before you can register them in the IOM they will have to go through a Manx Vehicle Test which is quite strict, but the good news is, we still have the rolling 25 years road tax rule over here so if your bikes are over 25 years old you will only have to pay £5 per year to tax them.

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from the question "what's it like living here", I would say a pullover colder, you'll have the heating on more, a raincoat will be the usual outer garment, and get used to the wind blowing everything you plant in the garden to bits !

 

Get used to the frustration of seeing things advertised which would just be a run down the motorway but from here take a 3-day trip and a couple of overnight hotels, and that week in Florida on offer for £199 will cost you about £1000 !

 

This one I find interesting. Firstly, I cannot remember the last time I wore a pullover. I cannot remember the last time I wore a jacket/raincoat. My house does not have central heating, it is not necessary. I cannot remember in recent years a winter where there was any serious amount of snow or ice (there was one bad storm in the very early 90s, but that is not really recent).

 

The truth is that the IOM is a great place to live. It has its drawbacks like everywhere, but the benefits far outweigh them.

 

The youth complains that there is nothing to do. Well that is exactly the same as the youth attitude in the UK. People complain about the price of electricity, petrol, gas, meat, bread, but is that not the same as in most of the UK? Basically, the thing British people are best at is moaning and as you may have guessed from a large proportion of the posts on this thread, many Manx people are no different.

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I'm just a bit worried that this man and partner think we are going to be impressed by the fact he has money and even more worried that he feels he has to state his ethnic origins. Why woud we be interested? Why is it a matter of concern to him?

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I'm just a bit worried that this man and partner think we are going to be impressed by the fact he has money.

 

I'm not quite sure that such an impression is entirely justified, and even if it is, it pales as a cause for concern when compared to this humdinger of a statement:

 

"Devon is full of 3rd world living on handouts and dealing in drugs"

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