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Lttv - Special On Iom Smoking Ban


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I bet those BBC chaps left the Island with huge big smiles on their faces that day. Hah, hah - Isle of Man shafted again!!!!

 

Shafted is a bit strong. VS your average UK small town of a similar size, we're missing what, a local radio station? Well, we've got three already that few enough people listen to, why do we want another?

 

Most of the dosh from the beeb goes into national TV, which we benefit fully from. The other big spend is national radio, which far more people on the island use than local radio. The rest is local radio and the web, which account for less than 10% of the license fee.

 

Shafted is definately pushing it. Marginally less for our money is closer to the truth.

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Shafted is definately pushing it. Marginally less for our money is closer to the truth.

 

Yeah ok, I'll go with that, but considering what they could have gone away with after the summit meeting, I bet they went away laughing. Also, IIRC, amazingly Richard got a good press as to having told those BBC execs a thing or two.

 

Do Ireland pay a licence fee? Or Holland or Norway or France? Do we really give a damn if our news isn't reported anyway? I'm sure the people living in the UK are bored stiff with our news about horse trams and murders and the MEA.

 

Anyway, now we've got this internet thing we might be able to tell the BBC where to get off, with all their disgusting language and subversive broadcasting.

Edited by nipper
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I *THINK* the problem here is that a Manx politician at some stage must have said 'yes' to the BBC licence fee being payable in the Isle of Man, and it's now too late to overturn that.

Oh yes? - and debated in Keys and agreed by Tynwald and incorporated into Manx law? Or maybe that Manx politician can just make laws as he likes?

 

Simple fact is the UK legislation was 'extended' to IoM by an Order in Council. If IoM was 'consulted' ('voluntarily' accepted it), then shouldn't the consultation involve Tynwald? Nope - the wisdom of the Westminster mandarins is good enough. (though a courtesy notice is probably politic). It's comforting to think a local politician might have had a say in it, and that sky fairies watch over IoM, but - well - deal with reality. There is the OiC. Where is evidence of this Manx politician - if there is please tell.

 

 

To be clear I'm not suggesting 'overturning' IoM being included in BBC License fee. What I am suggesting is that the BBC do the job that the are required to do. Fine - probing questions may or may not have been asked - but whatever, the BBC is still not meeting its Charter obligations. Bigwig visits don't make up for the BBC not delivering the service it is legally obliged to.

 

my guess is that they'll justify our 'exposure' by applying a percentage rule - something like the 1 in a thousand (rule of thumb).

 

If we don't get THAT, we probably have a case.

Stu the Charter obligation is what it is. Read it. As I said, even if it cost £20m and the programming produced was 2% of the BBC output (extreme) then even so this would be what the BBC would have to do - if that is what is required to meet what it is 'contractually' obliged to deliver under the Charter.

 

There is no 'proportional' stipulation in the Charter. You can't invent excuses for failing to do a job.

 

I'm also not suggesting the BBC is "shafting" the IoM - just that it has missed out a bit of its job. (And IoMG are possibly negligent in supervision or would prefer not to have BBC journos poking around anyway). You don't jump up and down if a contractor hasn't done a job up to required standard and accuse him of shafting you. You point out the deficiency to them and ask them to get it up to standard - and refer them to the contract if needed. The BBC's Charter is the equivalent of this contract - bigwig discussions with local politicians don't, can't and won't change the BBC's Charter obligations.

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Skeddan - I'm not contradicting you or offering a definite answer - just a couple of guesses.

 

Another one - are we even covered by the BBC Charter? Isn't that designed for the benefit of the UK viewer/listener (which opens a whole new can of worms)? And however we got INTO paying the licence fee, would it really be that simple and legal for the current Government to opt out at this stage?

 

I have no specialist knowledge in this area, so I'm as interested as the next guy in the real answers.

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*sigh*

 

I think you're probably just miffed that your own piece to camera in Amber didn't make it onto the final report! :D

By the way, is that the first time you've ended up on the cutting-room floor? :rolleyes:

 

:lol:

Alright lads! I cut the interview short because I was a) intrigued by the interviewess's mono-brow and b) dazzled by the interrogation light straight into my eyes from above the camera. Even so all I could say about the ban was it was inevitable. As for the cutting room floor, I never was destined for stardom.

 

To Cheeky Boy: I think you mis-read Lonan; he said 'ended up on the cutting room floor' not 'up-ended on the cutting room floor'.

 

To Stu: From what I have heard on your august station, the IOM is included in some broadcasting act of the UK Parliament and my guess is that we cannot legitimately unilaterally remove ourselves from the effect of that legislation, it would have to be by an amending act of the UK parliament. If we did so, I can only see confrontation with the UK which could easily end up in some constitutional crisis for the IOM from which we would end up with at least a bloody nose. It could be a test too far of just how autonomous Tynwald really is.

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Another one - are we even covered by the BBC Charter? Isn't that designed for the benefit of the UK viewer/listener (which opens a whole new can of worms)? And however we got INTO paying the licence fee, would it really be that simple and legal for the current Government to opt out at this stage?

 

I have no specialist knowledge in this area, so I'm as interested as the next guy in the real answers.

 

This matter has been discussed from various angles on many occasions in Tynwald over the years. About ten years ago the Government had an awful lot of difficulty in even getting the BBC to reply to their correspondence. Some of the more emotional politicians suggested we stop paying the licence fee or at least put the proceeds into an account until such time as the BBC bosses acknowledged the letters.

 

On one occasion though, after a Calm down! Calm down! scenario, Tynwald realised, that however the situation had arrived, they could not that easily get out of it and in particular they did not want to upset the UK Government. (It is not easy pretending to be an Independent country).

 

Anyway, a bit off topic, I note that Bill Malarkey asked the following question:

 

TYNWALD COURT, WEDNESDAY, 21st MARCH 2007

 

Free TV licences for pensioners - Cost to Social Security

 

Question from Bill Malarkey: How much did it cost Social Security for free BBC television licences to pensioners in the last financial year?

 

Answer: Total expenditure on free TV licences in the financial year 2005-06 was £576,118.

( Source Tynwald Hansard March 2007 page 436 )

 

I thought that only over 75s got a free TV licence and that it was not subsidised by Social Security.

 

Do all pensioners get a free TV licence on the Isle of Man and is it paid for by Social Security?

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Faroes (pop 48,000) have a national TV station

Andorra (pop 72,000) have a national TV station

San Marino (pop 30,000) have a national TV station

Scottish Gaelic Speakers (pop 60, 000 - 80,000 ) have a digital TV station (but not terrestrial) (and a BBC radio station!)

 

Mannin (pop 80,000+) We pay an expensive license fee to the UK and in return the BBC occassionaly make a program about us from their point of view and have recruited a grand total of 2 staff here - and we have to find a bit to help fund a national radio station on top of that. And we aren't getting shafted?

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I think this station idea is great, a little more content ie more stories if there is any.

I am sick of having to watch border news just too see if half way through the isle of man might get a mention for 3 secs.

we are always made to feel second best when we pay the same fees as the rest of the British Isles

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Not quite fully - I am unable to receive either Freeview or Channel 5 without extra expenditure on my part.

 

 

Sure, same with much of rural UK. If you want that shit, live in a city.

 

(PS, an old sky box and freeview can be had for as cheap as 50 quid off ebay)

 

National TV station? Are you having a laugh? I'll bet those stations listed are bloody awful, with viewers in the tens, not thousands. I'd certainly not watch a manx station, it'd be dull as fek.

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[National TV station? Are you having a laugh? I'll bet those stations listed are bloody awful, with viewers in the tens, not thousands. I'd certainly not watch a manx station, it'd be dull as fek.

 

Agreed. Oxford (population something or other) has it's own station and it's absolutely dire and mostly nicks programmes from other channels to fill in the huge gaps in its own poor programming. IF they could get something of the quality of longtaletv going then fine, but you just know that wouldn't happen.

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[National TV station? Are you having a laugh? I'll bet those stations listed are bloody awful, with viewers in the tens, not thousands. I'd certainly not watch a manx station, it'd be dull as fek.

 

Agreed. Oxford (population something or other) has it's own station and it's absolutely dire and mostly nicks programmes from other channels to fill in the huge gaps in its own poor programming. IF they could get something of the quality of longtaletv going then fine, but you just know that wouldn't happen.

 

Is that SixTV? It's the gold standard for all local television (which occupies a position in the entertainment hierarchy somewhere between student TV and Punch and Judy shows) - tv shows so old that they were last broadcast on a zoetrope, sky news, and cheapo-shitto brand music tv.

 

Any Manx tv schedule would probably be pretty similar:

 

9am : News (via a camcorder mounted in Manx radio)

10am: Old Men Discuss: Pavements of the Island from 1954 to the Present Day

11am: On the Buses

12am: Quayle of a Time: Twee lifestyle magazine presented by someone with Quayle as their surname. This week - a school play, an advertisement for a local tanning saloon vaguely tarted up to look like a feature on the holiday season, and an interview with some local nutcase who collects pebbles that look like Frankie Howard

1pm: Pictures of Bracken: An hour of stills of various locations around the Island, set to soothing mediocre celtic music played on an aging Casio keyboard.

2pm: Old Neighbours: Billy gets trapped in a bin, whilst Harold wobbles his jowels for five minutes and says "Ah!"

3pm: News

4pm: Childrens TV: two hours of badly constructed puppets shrieking at one another in a brightly decorated but otherwise bare studio. Breesha the Inquisitive Bonnag goes to Peel Castle and talks about ghosts. Again.

6pm: Old Neighbours (repeat)

7pm: ManX Be4tz!: Interactive local music television. Press the red button to hear about Back Door Slam again, the green button for Uberroom, or just hurl your remote to the floor and weep in despair for an hour.

8pm: <<___~~~##^cYb3rM4nX^##~~~___>>: A whole hour of Myspace pages and YouTube videos made by locals.

9pm: News

10pm: Yn Dreeys: Gaelic discussion show set in Cregneash. Three quietly spoken men talking to one another in Manx about what it's like and how satisfying it is to talk in Manx to one another, all whilst young children in peasant clothes dance around a Loghtan sheep and a wizened fisherman guts a mound of herring.

12pm: You should be in bed: A regular feature where a grumpy old man stares into the camera and explains in no uncertain terms why you should be in bed by now, and why its people like you who are ruining the Island.

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