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Aspergers Local Charity?


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I was wondering if anyone would be able to help with some information, if possible.

 

Do any of you know of an Isle of Man based charity for local donations, specifically dealing with raising awareness and providing support for young people with Asperger Syndrome? It is an autistic spectrum disorder and classic autism is well recognised and well supported, whereas Asperger children are usually high functioning and have to cope with mainstream education, often with little assistance.

 

Any suggestions/comments gratefully received.

 

Thank you.

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There's an autism support group (now called Autism in Mann), and the Manx branch of the National Autism Society, but to be honest I can't think of much else. For what it's worth, things are slowly changing regarding assistance, at least in the higher education sector where a fair bit of help and support is being made available for students with aspergers and high functioning autism.

 

Best of luck finding what you're looking for.

Edited by VinnieK
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There's an autism support group (now called Autism in Mann), and the Manx branch of the National Autism Society, but to be honest I can't think of much else. For what it's worth, things are slowly changing regarding assistance, at least in the higher education sector where a fair bit of help and support is being made available for students with aspergers and high functioning autism.

 

Best of luck finding what you're looking for.

 

 

Thanks for that - I'm looking to make donations, but specifically Aspergers - it sounds as though you are pretty well informed... there seems to be little for Asperger children, particularly the gifted.

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there seems to be little for Asperger children, particularly the gifted.

 

Indeed! Though I suspect there is a limit to what can be done in schools and educational institutions and whatnot other than make exceptions, take into consideration certain needs (like allowing dictaphones in the class), and issue encouragement. One-to-one tuition can help, but there's a fine line between accomodating kids with autistic disorders and removing them from a normal environment to the point where they start to withdraw more. It's a very tricky issue, to be sure!

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I'm no good with the search thingy on here but didn't we have a topic on something similar/relevant within the last year or so?

Maybe someone can track it down?

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I was wondering if anyone would be able to help with some information, if possible.

 

Do any of you know of an Isle of Man based charity for local donations, specifically dealing with raising awareness and providing support for young people with Asperger Syndrome? It is an autistic spectrum disorder and classic autism is well recognised and well supported, whereas Asperger children are usually high functioning and have to cope with mainstream education, often with little assistance.

 

Any suggestions/comments gratefully received.

 

Thank you.

 

I know of someone who used to work for a local firm providing support for people with Asperger Syndrome, I'll speak to them on Monday and let you know what info they have.

 

Hope that helps.

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Iam afraid I do not have any info for you but wished to comment on your comment about there not being much for Aspergers children on the Island......my 12 year old daughter is in mainstream secondry education, she is gifted, she is bullied, she is socially inept and has no strong friendships. She hates school, finds everything really easy, needs challenge, feels she doesnt fit in. The school, the speacial needs service and education psycology service have been great but there is a limit to the amount they can provide. Outwith the spe

cial needs the other teachers seem to have very little understanding of the very different needs and approach these children require. She functions at school without too many problems because there are set rules and patterns to her day. At home she is increasingly more aggressive, her anxieties are heightened due to the looser routine and less defined boundaries. These are leading to more obsessional behaviour.

 

As a family I feel we need somewhere to meet with other families, she requires a social outlet to be with others who are likeminded. The support of others sharing the same difficulties would be a great help. The lady at the NAS was fantastic and offered some very useful information. The autism needs are different to the aspergers needs from what I have read and witnessed though?

 

I may be showing some ignorance with regard to what is available and some of these wishes I have spoken about may already exsist! We have only had a diagnosis within the past year so we are still exploring! I will continue to follow the thread in case someone comes up with more info.

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My brother is 12 and is aspergic too. There was a lot of bother trying to assess his needs and do the best for him in terms of schooling because keeping him in special needs would have held him back, yet it didn't seem he had the social skills to manage mainstream schooling. It is a lot harder for him to build social relationships but he is doing fine at the moment. Unfortunately, he has pathologised himself in a disturbing way which I don't like at all, though I don't know where it comes from. He recognises he is different but sees it in a negative way and where he has a condition or problem. That is really wrong, as he is just different that's all - he doesn't HAVE something, just the way he is.

 

I'll ask my Mum to see what groups she has links to.

Edited by La_Dolce_Vita
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In years gone by, children with Asperger's would have been described as 'sensitive' which masks a whole, already hidden, area of behaviour.

 

If anyone is interested in starting an Asperger's group, I would be very interested in participating. Autism is probably well documented and catered for now, but Asperger's is one of those dispositions that is pretty well ignored as it is less apparent and can be more easily managed, once recognised. The problem is if you take away the management, the child falls to pieces.

 

I have had concerns in this area, but without really making a fuss, I don't think anyone will recognise the issues; he is a bright boy, so performs well academically; seeks approval all the time, so he behaves well, and when he hasn't, it has absolutely devastated him. Yet no one believes this to be anomalous.

 

All the time, I know in my heart that he is ill-equipped, yet because he is doing so well at school, an educational problem isn't apparent. Where else do you go?

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I have had concerns in this area, but without really making a fuss, I don't think anyone will recognise the issues; he is a bright boy, so performs well academically; seeks approval all the time, so he behaves well, and when he hasn't, it has absolutely devastated him. Yet no one believes this to be anomalous.

 

All the time, I know in my heart that he is ill-equipped, yet because he is doing so well at school, an educational problem isn't apparent. Where else do you go?

 

This is the big worry. It's by no means very comprehensive advice, but if he or she hasn't got a formal diagnosis, do get one. Should they decide to go to university, they can then declare it on the application. Some will be tempted not to, for fear of damaging their prospects and this can be counter productive if the child is called to interview, performs badly, and the admissions tutors have no idea that it could be due to aspergers. From what I've seen, most seem to assess students with aspergers on their own merits and on an individual basis, and I know for a fact that they're certainly not turned away because of it. The upside of declaring it is also the department is prepared and can assign people to help (if that's what's desired) and offer assistance/learning strategies/what have you. Nowadays lecturers and teaching staff are all briefed on how best to accomodate and help kids with autistic spectrum disorders, and told beforehand who in their classes have formal diagnosis, so it's best for everyone (especially since it's not unknown for even a bright and motivated student with aspergers to lose their way within the unstructured and freer environment of a university).

 

Hopefully, with the academic side covered the social element of university might help them adjust and get used to interacting with people in an adult environment before they go into the workplace. Anyway, this is just one particular scenario, so probably not that helpful. Other than that, perhaps the best that can be done is what any parent would, to try and get them to open up about things that are bothering them and to listen: try to see the world through their eyes, and advise them the best you can. In this situation a support group could prove invaluable, as parents and indeed children could readily exchange advice and coping strategies.

Edited by VinnieK
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If anyone is interested in starting an Asperger's group, I would be very interested in participating.

 

I would also be interested in helping to get something off the ground.....I think I will indicate this to NAS and see if they would put out the feelers amongst their registered folk to gauge the interest. Ummm.....will investigate and keep you informed Gladys.

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I was wondering if anyone would be able to help with some information, if possible.

 

Do any of you know of an Isle of Man based charity for local donations, specifically dealing with raising awareness and providing support for young people with Asperger Syndrome? It is an autistic spectrum disorder and classic autism is well recognised and well supported, whereas Asperger children are usually high functioning and have to cope with mainstream education, often with little assistance.

 

Any suggestions/comments gratefully received.

 

Thank you.

 

I know of someone who used to work for a local firm providing support for people with Asperger Syndrome, I'll speak to them on Monday and let you know what info they have.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Hi there,

 

Sorry for taking so long to respond, I was trying to get in touch with my friend but he was on holiday and I didn't realise he was using a UK mobile number; doh!

 

I'll PM what little details they could give me, it seems to reflect what has been said elsewhere on this thread, i.e. there are some people doing some things but, at this stage, it is a bit like trying to hit in a nail with a chocolate hammer.

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