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Many of the roadside banks are now awash with colour (yellow). Unfortunately, this is predominantly ragwort that is dangerous/an offence to allow to flourish. There are beautiful borders all the way along the Sloc.

 

What next.............Roundabout Ragwort Reserves............or has someone already spotted one?

 

RagwortCloseUp.jpg

Ragwort

 

The "Weeds Act 1957" provides for the control of

injurious weeds. Under this act ragwort is not permitted to

remain uncut or not destroyed by the first day of August in

any year or on an earlier date when flowers are developing.

Ragwort is poisonous to farm livestock and should be

controlled whenever it occurs in grassland

The most effective herbicides for ragwort control are 2,4-

D (various), MCPA (various) and Amidosulfuron (Squire)

Grazed pasture should be sprayed from late April to

late May

Grassland to be cut for

hay or silage should be

sprayed in autumn of

the preceding year

If the sward contains

White Clover Squire

should be used as it

is safe on established

clover plants

Stock must be kept out of fields for at least 3 weeks

after cutting or spraying, until the ragwort has

disintegrated and disappeared

Control of high populations by husbandry techniques

is very difficult. Low populations can be kept down

by pulling or by grazing with sheep (or goats) over

winter / early spring

For permanent control, spraying and other husbandry

measures should be followed-up by improved

management to promote a dense vigorous sward.

The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry will

send you a free leaflet entitled "Ragwort poisoning and

control by husbandry and chemical methods" if you

contact Knockaloe on 842335.

 

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Having spent many hours voluntarily clearing this plant from many fields I am amazed that the DOT fails on all counts to try and control this plant on its own land.

 

Once this plant is allowed to start seeding we can expect a bigger problem next year.

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Having spent many hours voluntarily clearing this plant from many fields I am amazed that the DOT fails on all counts to try and control this plant on its own land.

 

Once this plant is allowed to start seeding we can expect a bigger problem next year.

 

 

I thought it only an offence on cultivated land.

When I was young it was sign of poor farming to have cushag growing in your fields.

 

How many years since anybody has been prosecuted?

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Last year there was a particlarly good crop at Pooilvaish farm and there is always a good display at the Eairy Dam. This will eventually be cut probably those outside the fence by DOT and those inside by DAFF.

I have never heard of anyone being prosecuted.

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Having spent many hours voluntarily clearing this plant from many fields I am amazed that the DOT fails on all counts to try and control this plant on its own land.

 

Once this plant is allowed to start seeding we can expect a bigger problem next year.

you will that that the verges are not owned by the DOT it belongs to the adjacent land owener they only cut the verges as road safety measure

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Well what is needed is a way of keeping it under control naturally

 

The Cinnabar moth is the better way to control it, there are some in the north that really decimate the ragwort (cushag), stripping plants in hours.

 

here look Link

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Having spent many hours voluntarily clearing this plant from many fields I am amazed that the DOT fails on all counts to try and control this plant on its own land.

 

Once this plant is allowed to start seeding we can expect a bigger problem next year.

you will that that the verges are not owned by the DOT it belongs to the adjacent land owener they only cut the verges as road safety measure

 

 

Where in my post did I mention verges. I thought I specifically referred to DOT land. In hindsight, what I should have said was government land to include DAFF and the other departments who fail to control this plant on their own land.

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Having spent many hours voluntarily clearing this plant from many fields I am amazed that the DOT fails on all counts to try and control this plant on its own land.

 

Once this plant is allowed to start seeding we can expect a bigger problem next year.

you will that that the verges are not owned by the DOT it belongs to the adjacent land owener they only cut the verges as road safety measure

 

 

Where in my post did I mention verges. I thought I specifically referred to DOT land. In hindsight, what I should have said was government land to include DAFF and the other departments who fail to control this plant on their own land.

 

I noticed this morning that the Airport has a striking display of ragwort in its grounds. The industrial estates are also looking particularly radiant.

 

I've also just remembered seeing vast acreages of the blooms in some of the DAFF plantations. People who live in glass houses?

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Well what is needed is a way of keeping it under control naturally

 

The Cinnabar moth is the better way to control it, there are some in the north that really decimate the ragwort (cushag), stripping plants in hours.

 

here look Link

 

Good link Smelly with plenty of information. Seems like an over reaction to ragwort by the horsey crowd.

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Ragwort = cushag and is the national flower of the Isle of Man!

 

It is an excellent species for wildlife and is only an issue where livestock esp. horses are present.

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Ragwort = cushag and is the national flower of the Isle of Man!

 

It is an excellent species for wildlife and is only an issue where livestock esp. horses are present.

 

Trouble is if left unchecked will spread via seeds to fields containing livestock. So the issue is not just where livestock are present. Better prevention as very little can be done for livestock suffering from liver failure.

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Ragwort = cushag and is the national flower of the Isle of Man!

 

It is an excellent species for wildlife and is only an issue where livestock esp. horses are present.

 

Trouble is if left unchecked will spread via seeds to fields containing livestock. So the issue is not just where livestock are present. Better prevention as very little can be done for livestock suffering from liver failure.

 

Fuck the horses.

Leave the Ragwort alone.

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I suggest you all read the link that Roger Smelly posted. Horses will avoid Ragwort unless there is nothing else to eat. It seems it's more of an issue if ragwort is cut with grass and made into silage where it can't be easily detected.

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I suggest you all read the link that Roger Smelly posted. Horses will avoid Ragwort unless there is nothing else to eat. It seems it's more of an issue if ragwort is cut with grass and made into silage where it can't be easily detected.

 

You are quite correct. The issue is when it is cut for hay / haylage.

"When cut or wilted (during hay or haylage making) ragwort loses its bitter taste and becomes more palatable to horses. Drying does not destroy the toxins and dried grass, hay and haylage are common sources of ragwort poisoning."

 

The advice from most sources suggest that "Prevention is the best option".

 

BTW The intolerence shown by some members on this site to other members / groups in our Island is unfortunate and a poor reflection of our society in general.

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"When cut or wilted (during hay or haylage making) ragwort loses its bitter taste and becomes more palatable to horses."

 

The advice from most sources suggest that "Prevention is the best option".

 

From the link it suggests "Hay from fields with Ragwort should not be fed to stock or horses. Where confidence is lacking, it is possible toss and shake through the hay to remove worrying material (it would seem that missing the occasional shoot should not be too critical)."

 

I thought the letter from the vet was interesting....

 

"-Ragwort in hay is normally rejected by horses, and is easily removed by the groom or owner, - The main problem could arise with silage incorporating Ragwort.

 

- He suggests that, in view of the high number horse deaths attributed to liver damage by Ragwort poisoning, it is time to look for other possible toxins. Pesticides added to grain to control weevils and mites is one possibility."

 

 

 

 

"Just as horse owners have sought understanding of their genuine concerns, so to their understanding is sought of the biodiversity at stake. There ought to a compatibility of objectives if the need for Ragwort control is not over-played, and for that matter if the quantity of Ragwort for conservation needs is not over-stated. The objective is to ensure that in any district there is a place for both horses and the special wildlife of Ragwort." A balanced and sensible approach? That's a pretty rare thing these days.

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