Jump to content
Manx Forums, Live Chat, Blogs & Classifieds for the Isle of Man
Sign in to follow this  
Theodolite

Mhks Discuss 'escalating' Threat Posed By Legal Highs

Recommended Posts

At first I thought this was about the Government giving carte blanche to inflict advocates charges of over £300 per hour in very dodgy court cases.

 

But then I realised this was about drugs.

 

Isle of Man Newspapers

 

But are 'drugs' really that problematic in our societyl? People who take them know full well the risks and consequences of their actions. A recent case saw a cocaine dealer given 15 years in prison. But surely the drug dealer's customers aren't forced to take the drugs. Whereas for example, a rapist does their harmful and despicable deed without the other person's consent. Same as people who inflict serious assault. But these such criminals get half, if that, the sentence of that drug dealer.

 

It is about time that people were allowed to make up their own minds regarding drugs and our Government concentrated on education in this regard. Unfortunately, in order to educate someone, the designated educator generally needs to be more intelligent than the person chosen to be educated.

 

And therein is where this Island falls flat on its face.

 

 

 

 

 

For the avoidance of doubt I do not take, or am involved with drugs, other than occasional beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're right. But well, politicians find it very hard to get elected when their manifesto involves legalising drugs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guernsey banned legal highs earlier this year - unfortunately its not just adults that get addicted also young children.

 

The link below shows some stats which should make people think.....its not just about allowing people to get high!

 

http://www.thisisguernsey.com/2009/11/03/t...of-legal-highs/

Edited by daisy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking as a young person on the Island, currently away at Uni, I have encountered significantly more drugs on the island than at Uni (as hard as this is to believe) and I have recently lost a close friend in a drug related death.

 

I really do think the Island has a serious drug problem and needs to get to grips with it, rather than bury it's head in the sand, treating it as an issue for the UK and not the Island. I welcome the strong sentences given to proven drug dealers, but there needs to be a much wider education and rehabilitative policy, as deterrence alone has been proven to be pretty weak.

 

The problem with these legal highs is that they are almost actively promoted as an alternative to 'hard' drugs, and so people instinctively think they will be safer, because the government hasn't prohibited them. This is completely false, but because of our current system or regulation it is an unfortunate by-product. Also, even if the Island were to ban them, they are still available widely across the internet, and so it would be such a difficult system to police, and people will always find their way round it. After all, 'hard' drugs are illegal, yet people can still get their hands on them pretty easily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good first post.

Well said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some people like getting high. They mostly grow out of it.

 

If you ban something or make it difficult to find people will take something else. By prohibiting stuff which has been used for centuries, and which is relatively well understood, you encourage people towards less well understood and potentially quite nasty highs.

 

People sometimes talk about the relative dangers of skunk and other strong weed. But those hybrids were developed specifically to be grown under lights in northern european climates - as a direct result of the enforcement of the illegality of importing more traditional varieties from the sunnier countries. There is a good argument that the strong varieties of weed which are cited as examples of the dangers of dope exist because of prohibition. Equally people are apparently eating 'plant food' (whatever that is) because previously legal compounds are no longer legal.

 

Prohibition is dangerous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always I am hearing, 'Ban this evil drug' - the drug is not the addict. That useless bint of a drugs tzar goes on and on about dangerous drugs (when she isn't busy organising/attending another pointless conference) and now we have another uninformed clown attempting to boost his polling figures by calling for the immediate banning of these crappy legal highs. No where do I see or hear ANYTHING about addiction, addiction, habit, institutionalisation, they are the demons, but what can you do about it? People should be thinking about addiction before they start with anything repetitive, humans are quite funny little things, innit?

 

Kopmatt, maybe you are living a sheltered life at uni, when I goto the UK there is plenty of evidence of drug use, all over the place :) Stoners eating food, ravers dancing their heads off, trippers laughing, smak heads dreaming and begging for cash, where you at lad?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guernsey banned legal highs earlier this year - unfortunately its not just adults that get addicted also young children.

 

So ban them for under 16s. Comprende?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Good first post.

Well said.

Don't worry I am sure they will learn soon enough and get into the standard posting style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Always I am hearing, 'Ban this evil drug' - the drug is not the addict. That useless bint of a drugs tzar goes on and on about dangerous drugs (when she isn't busy organising/attending another pointless conference) and now we have another uninformed clown attempting to boost his polling figures by calling for the immediate banning of these crappy legal highs. No where do I see or hear ANYTHING about addiction, addiction, habit, institutionalisation, they are the demons, but what can you do about it? People should be thinking about addiction before they start with anything repetitive, humans are quite funny little things, innit?

 

Kopmatt, maybe you are living a sheltered life at uni, when I goto the UK there is plenty of evidence of drug use, all over the place :) Stoners eating food, ravers dancing their heads off, trippers laughing, smak heads dreaming and begging for cash, where you at lad?

 

Well, I am in the South with the 'soft-southerners' lol.

 

I agree with your point though, banning these things is not, of itself the right answer. We should be looking at other ways of encouragement, using the carrot as well as the stick. If a drug is proven to be a danger to the people who take it, then I think the government does have very good reasons for considering to prohibit it. But the prohibition must only take place alongside serious education and rehabilitation programmes.

 

I'm also of the opinion that mere use of a drug should not be criminalised. It is the supply of the drug that must be combated, not necessarily the taking of the drug. Many of these 'legal highs' will be taken by young people, and it is proven that criminalising young people only leads to further drug, alcohol and anti-social behaviour issues in the future.

 

Some people like getting high. They mostly grow out of it.

 

If you ban something or make it difficult to find people will take something else. By prohibiting stuff which has been used for centuries, and which is relatively well understood, you encourage people towards less well understood and potentially quite nasty highs.

 

People sometimes talk about the relative dangers of skunk and other strong weed. But those hybrids were developed specifically to be grown under lights in northern european climates - as a direct result of the enforcement of the illegality of importing more traditional varieties from the sunnier countries. There is a good argument that the strong varieties of weed which are cited as examples of the dangers of dope exist because of prohibition. Equally people are apparently eating 'plant food' (whatever that is) because previously legal compounds are no longer legal.

 

Prohibition is dangerous.

 

I also think you're completely right. Prohibition usually only leads to people finding alternative ways of circumventing the law, or finding alternative 'legal' drugs which have unknown effects on these people, because we only focus on the illegal ones.

 

However, I think that prohibition can work, only if it is backed up by meaningful investment and focus on rehabilitation and education programs. At the moment the drug and alcohol units are chronically underfunded, which means that they can't offer the support that drug addicts need, so they are stuck in a spiral of crime and addiction, which is not good for them or society.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm also of the opinion that mere use of a drug should not be criminalised. It is the supply of the drug that must be combated, not necessarily the taking of the drug.

Are you sure you're at a southern university and not the famous college at Hendon? Because the police are fond of that "it's not the users we're interested in, but the dealers". Pretty stupid if you ask me. I don't see how you can have users without dealers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I am in the South with the 'soft-southerners' lol.
I tended to notice that people, even uni students, drink a lot less than their counterparts on the rock and that heroin abuse was much higher on the Island. Whereas recreational drugs and the variety of drugs is greater when I went to university.

 

Though it is amusing to consider that people my age on the Island tend to be very anti-drugs in a non-thinking manner - they just think they are very very bad. More so it seems than people in the UK who have more knowledge and recognise what they are and what they do, and other who partake in them. Yet of all the societies, the Manx is the one where people seem be big pissheads - as demonstrated on nights out on the Island. All very hypocritical.

 

 

If a drug is proven to be a danger to the people who take it, then I think the government does have very good reasons for considering to prohibit it. But the prohibition must only take place alongside serious education and rehabilitation programmes.
I don't think they are good reasons. Drugs CAN be dangerous and be dangerous for certain people. But then so are some others legal drugs and many other activities in day-to-day life. Driving is quite dangerous, should they be prohibited?

 

And no I certainly don't condone tough sentences to drug dealers. It is a foolish and hypocritical policy to punish them harshly.

 

I'm also of the opinion that mere use of a drug should not be criminalised. It is the supply of the drug that must be combated, not necessarily the taking of the drug. Many of these 'legal highs' will be taken by young people, and it is proven that criminalising young people only leads to further drug, alcohol and anti-social behaviour issues in the future.
I disagree. If you want to tackle it then you should look at the demand, not the supply. People, especially in the modern world where escapism is so craved for, are desperate or desire to varying degree to have the ability to move out of sobriety. There will be always be ways for this to be achieved. Drug use is just part of that and drugs will be with us forever.

 

The problem with these legal highs is that the users know very little about what they are and what negative effects they will have. In comparison, much more is known about the illegal drugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I am in the South with the 'soft-southerners' lol.
I tended to notice that people, even uni students, drink a lot less than their counterparts on the rock and that heroin abuse was much higher on the Island. Whereas recreational drugs and the variety of drugs is greater when I went to university.

 

Though it is amusing to consider that people my age on the Island tend to be very anti-drugs in a non-thinking manner - they just think they are very very bad. More so it seems than people in the UK who have more knowledge and recognise what they are and what they do, and other who partake in them. Yet of all the societies, the Manx is the one where people seem be big pissheads - as demonstrated on nights out on the Island. All very hypocritical.

 

 

If a drug is proven to be a danger to the people who take it, then I think the government does have very good reasons for considering to prohibit it. But the prohibition must only take place alongside serious education and rehabilitation programmes.
I don't think they are good reasons. Drugs CAN be dangerous and be dangerous for certain people. But then so are some others legal drugs and many other activities in day-to-day life. Driving is quite dangerous, should they be prohibited?

 

And no I certainly don't condone tough sentences to drug dealers. It is a foolish and hypocritical policy to punish them harshly.

 

I'm also of the opinion that mere use of a drug should not be criminalised. It is the supply of the drug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So legal highs are now banned in Isle of Man pubs and anyone caught in possesion of these legal substances could be banned from pubs in IOM for life ?

 

Dont touch them myself but surely Mr Harding who heads up a board of publicans and licensees must see the irony in this statement below

 

'MENA spokesman Steve Harding explained: ‘ There’s a perception that it’s OK but we will not allow these substances to be used on our premises because they are dangerous to people’s health and can result in customers’ evenings being ruined. '

 

Perhaps we rephrase his sentence just a little:

 

‘ We make money so its OK, thats why we allow ALCOHOLIC substances to be used on our premises despite the fact they are dangerous to people’s health and can result in customers’ evenings being ruined.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...