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9 hours ago, Chinahand said:

Fascinating story of an impact crater under the arctic ice in Greenland:

 

Indeed - I read this on the Guardian website yesterday - the earth is full of hidden surprises.

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It's divisive, that's what it is. The question of racism now seems to be more about the division between us rather than the inclusivity of us. It worries me.  

The very first thought in my mind when I saw that picture was obesity. Whatever colour you are, there are few excuses for that.

Don’t think it’s racist to post the image, but I’d argue that the topic that they’re talking about is.  Any phrase that starts “All white people are...” is by definition stereotyping according to skin

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... and things get more interesting still.

There are some indications that the impact occurred during something called the Younger Dryas, which is really controversial!

To understand why, you need a little backstory on the Younger Dryas period.

Most research on the cause of this interesting climate event has focused on mechanisms that could disrupt Atlantic Ocean circulation and halt its heat transport—roughly the plot of The Day After Tomorrow. Dumping a bunch of freshwater into the North Atlantic is basically the way to jam up this circulation, and many scientists think that a sudden release of accumulated glacial meltwater from Canada is the likely culprit.

But that’s not a certainty, and for the last decade a small group of scientists has been pushing a very different hypothesis—an impact event. The scientists’ claim has mostly centered on discoveries of purported impact fallout material at archeological sites in the North America. The problem is that none of those discoveries has stood up to the scrutiny of other scientists investigating the same sites. And, of course, there was no impact crater anywhere that fit the bill.

Predictably, that small group of scientists is awfully interested in this new crater. And since most people in this field consider the impact hypothesis to be completely unsupported—and are furthermore really sick of hearing about it—the authors of the crater study are in an awkward position. The paper reportedly underwent an unusually rigorous peer review process, with reviewers ensuring it didn’t draw any casual connections to the Younger Dryas fight. Now that it has been published, others are already weighing in with skepticism.

So did the impact crater form right at the time of the Younger Dryas cooling? Or is it a couple million years older than that? Or is it older still, with the researchers misinterpreting the significance of the chaotic ice inside it? Only additional research will settle this. There doesn’t seem to be any sign of material ejected from the crater in Greenland ice cores, for example, but modeling studies could clarify what signals we should look for. An ice core inside the crater would obviously be helpful, as could further examination of ice at the edge of the glacier, just past the crater.

Until then, about all we know is that a new impact crater—among the 25 largest in the world—has been added to the map. That’s an interesting story in itself, but the crater’s history remains to be filled in.

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2 hours ago, Chinahand said:

... and things get more interesting still.

There are some indications that the impact occurred during something called the Younger Dryas, which is really controversial!

To understand why, you need a little backstory on the Younger Dryas period.

Most research on the cause of this interesting climate event has focused on mechanisms that could disrupt Atlantic Ocean circulation and halt its heat transport—roughly the plot of The Day After Tomorrow. Dumping a bunch of freshwater into the North Atlantic is basically the way to jam up this circulation, and many scientists think that a sudden release of accumulated glacial meltwater from Canada is the likely culprit.

But that’s not a certainty, and for the last decade a small group of scientists has been pushing a very different hypothesis—an impact event. The scientists’ claim has mostly centered on discoveries of purported impact fallout material at archeological sites in the North America. The problem is that none of those discoveries has stood up to the scrutiny of other scientists investigating the same sites. And, of course, there was no impact crater anywhere that fit the bill.

Predictably, that small group of scientists is awfully interested in this new crater. And since most people in this field consider the impact hypothesis to be completely unsupported—and are furthermore really sick of hearing about it—the authors of the crater study are in an awkward position. The paper reportedly underwent an unusually rigorous peer review process, with reviewers ensuring it didn’t draw any casual connections to the Younger Dryas fight. Now that it has been published, others are already weighing in with skepticism.

So did the impact crater form right at the time of the Younger Dryas cooling? Or is it a couple million years older than that? Or is it older still, with the researchers misinterpreting the significance of the chaotic ice inside it? Only additional research will settle this. There doesn’t seem to be any sign of material ejected from the crater in Greenland ice cores, for example, but modeling studies could clarify what signals we should look for. An ice core inside the crater would obviously be helpful, as could further examination of ice at the edge of the glacier, just past the crater.

Until then, about all we know is that a new impact crater—among the 25 largest in the world—has been added to the map. That’s an interesting story in itself, but the crater’s history remains to be filled in.

I’d venture we have a typo in there, and an important one at that. In the para beginning...”Predictably, that small group...” in the penultimate line of that para I rather think the word “casual” should be “causal”. Makes much more sense.

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14 minutes ago, doc.fixit said:

.........any comments on the recent, random, rapid magnetic alterations in the Earth's magnetic field? Rather frightening I think.......

Are we undergoing one of those pole reversal event's?

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................don't know, apparently it's not predictable at moment, just unusually irregular..............can't find any more information on it but the scientists seemed perplexed and worried..........might be unexplained fluctuations in the molten metal river............

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3 hours ago, doc.fixit said:

.........any comments on the recent, random, rapid magnetic alterations in the Earth's magnetic field? Rather frightening I think.......

Been too busy to know much about it.  Randal Monroe doesn’t seem fazed so I assume all is ok.

magnetic_pole.png

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5 hours ago, doc.fixit said:

.........any comments on the recent, random, rapid magnetic alterations in the Earth's magnetic field? Rather frightening I think.......

Brexit

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14 hours ago, doc.fixit said:

.........any comments on the recent, random, rapid magnetic alterations in the Earth's magnetic field? Rather frightening I think.......

is this why polar bears are are arriving at peel claiming asylum........

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