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Giving Presents To Teachers


Theodolite
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I appreciate that this seems to be a hot topic generally but not here on the Isle of Man as far as I can see. I am probably out of touch here, but I was quite appalled to hear of a student's father giving his son's teacher a crate of beer as a present.

 

Is this an attempt to somehow curry favour? What do the other pupils now have to do? Do forum members give their children's teacher a bit of a sweetener?

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I have seen stuff on this and it think it is totally wrong, there have been news articles where it says some teachers are getting items worth a couple of hundred quid and the average is £30, a card yes but a gift no why should they expect this for doing their job when they are already being paid and quite well most of them, whats next we buy gifts for the local shop keeper, bar man, street cleaner, traffic warden, pub bouncer. Not only is it ridiculous but also you then get parents trying to do one better in the size of gift thus making the pooer parents feel as though they are letting the kids down. A better idea would be every child puts £1 in and buy a small token gift as a group.

 

 

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why should they expect this for doing their job when they are already being paid and quite well most of them,

 

I don't think any actually expect to be given gifts. The teaching unions themselves tried to tell people it wasn't necessary, desired, or expected that they buy their childrens' teachers gifts so why shift the blame, if there's blame to be apportioned, onto the teachers, rather than the parents who are after all the ones making the decision to give these gifts?

 

Edited to add: Looking into it a bit further, I'm beginning to wonder just how widespread this kind of thing is and just how lavish the gifts being bought are. The study behind this story was produced by Debenhams, which should set alarm bells ringing. Just like those 'studies' about the happiest/saddest day of the year, sexiest walk, and other nonsense, there's a very good chance that this isn't even vaguely a reliable study and is in fact some marketing toss churned out by Debenhams for their own gain.

Edited by VinnieK
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why should they expect this for doing their job when they are already being paid and quite well most of them,

 

I don't think any actually expect to be given gifts. The teaching unions themselves tried to tell people it wasn't necessary, desired, or expected that they buy their childrens' teachers gifts so why shift the blame, if there's blame to be apportioned, onto the teachers, rather than the parents who are after all the ones making the decision to give these gifts?

 

Edited to add: Looking into it a bit further, I'm beginning to wonder just how widespread this kind of thing is and just how lavish the gifts being bought are. The study behind this story was produced by Debenhams, which should set alarm bells ringing. Just like those 'studies' about the happiest/saddest day of the year, sexiest walk, and other nonsense, there's a very good chance that this isn't even vaguely a reliable study and is in fact some marketing toss churned out by Debenhams for their own gain.

True, maybe a bit wrong in saying all expect it, but I still stand by the fact that a joint gift from the whole class would prevent the less well of getting teased or feeling left out.

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True, maybe a bit wrong in saying all expect it, but I still stand by the fact that a joint gift from the whole class would prevent the less well of getting teased or feeling left out.

 

I agree with that. It's a bit weird giving them gifts anyway, and especially so for parents to buy their kids' teachers gifts.

 

I can understand the children themselves giving out cards and maybe getting something for a form tutor or a particular teacher at the end of primary, secondary, or A-Levels, but buying teachers presents at Christmas as a matter of course is a bit over the top.

 

my childs school sent out a text to me saying a collection is being made to buy vouchers for school teacher, bring £5.00 in and hand to reception.

 

Seriously? I hope you sent one back saying "bugger off". The school asking for that is out of order.

 

 

 

 

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Couldn't find anything about teachers terms and conditions, I did find the civil service ones though

 

http://www.gov.im/personnel/iomcs/cs_regs/section_A/a7.xml

 

7. ACCEPTANCE OF GIFTS AND REWARDS

 

a) It is an offence under the Prevention of Corruption Act, 1986 for a civil servant corruptly to accept any gift or consideration as an inducement or reward for:

 

1.doing, or refraining from doing, anything in his official capacity, or

2.showing favour or disfavour to any person in his official capacity.

b) A civil servant must not accept directly or indirectly any gift, reward or benefit from any member of the public or organisation with whom he is brought into contact by reason of his official duties.

 

c) If the refusal of a proffered gift is likely to cause offence to the giver, a civil servant should, in accordance with the Financial Regulations, immediately submit a written report to his Accounting Officer, or if he is the Accounting Officer, to the Chief Secretary. In suitable cases, permission may be granted for the gift to be retained but the opportunity should be taken to avoid further gifts being offered from the same source.

 

d) The following items are not considered to be either gifts or rewards:-

 

1.general hospitality, such as business lunches;

2.normal commercial advertising, e.g. diaries, pens and calendars;

3.in the case of Ministers/Members, any gift with an estimated value below £100

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Seems to be quite prevalent according to TES

 

link

 

I don't know, quite a few of those posts seemed to contradict the high average conjoured up by Debenhams, and more than a couple suggest that it's mainly a feature of primary schools..

 

It's still a bit bewildering though, when did all this become the norm? I must be getting old, I can't even imagine knowing the date of a teacher's birthday back in my schooldays, never mind getting them something.

Edited by VinnieK
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What's this... another thread to rant at teachers? Oh..

 

There is nothing wrong in a student giving a gift to a teacher.. although my wife did receive a Rose from a student at Valentines Day some years ago! :) hehe

 

Parents want to complain about everything these days.

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