Jump to content

Television Licence Refund To Go To Manx Radio


somewhatdamaged
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm not sure it's that much of a red herring. Were MR seen to provide a valuable service I think giving them the money coming from the BBC would be more justifiable. It would still be controversial, but the argument that it's going into a service like the one we paid into in the first place would carry more weight.

Maybe, but the incessant awful adverts render that argument at present a nonsense. The whole point and justification of the licence fee is to have no such advertising.

 

Government, always keen to avoid actual job losses from within and wanting to ensure they have plenty of platforms to electioneer from, decided the payback from the BBC should be used to plug the gap.

Can I expect a phone call from government soon then demanding I contribute £10 towards a new mayoral chain? Or some similar mugging?

 

I'm a big supporter of the BBC and the licence system, and pay for a couple of licences every year. I am going to avoid paying one of these next time it is up for renewal, perfectly legally of course, but purely for reasons of protestation in order to recuperate the money I feel has been stolen from me, as a licence payer.

Edited by ManxTaxPayer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Radioplayer launches with hundreds of stations [Guardian]

 

Internet radio service offers live streaming and on-demand content from BBC and majority of commercial broadcasters

 

Listeners can now access live streaming and on-demand content from hundreds of different radio stations – including BBC Radio 2 and Classic FM – in one place for the first time.

 

Radioplayer is embedded onto each radio station's website as a pop-up player. Listeners can tune in live to their favourite stations or catch up on shows they have missed. The streaming service will initially only be available online, with mobile applications for the iPhone and iPad expected to follow by the end of this year.

 

All of the BBC's local and national stations, as well as about 140 commercial broadcasters, are available on the service from launch. Stations owned by Bauer Media, such as Magic and Kerrang, and UTV's TalkSport will join the service later this week, taking the total number of stations available to 228.

 

Within a year, each of the 400 Ofcom-licensed radio stations in the UK will be available on Radioplayer, said Andrew Harrison, the chief executive of commercial radio trade body Radio Centre and chairman of the venture. Radioplayer is also likely to have a presence on YouView, the service bringing on-demand content to Freeview and Freesat households that is set to launch early next year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The justification/popularity/quality/etc of Manx Radio is a big fucking red herring. The question remains - why on earth are Manx Radio getting this money?

 

I'm not sure it's that much of a red herring. Were MR seen to provide a valuable service I think giving them the money coming from the BBC would be more justifiable. It would still be controversial, but the argument that it's going into a service like the one we paid into in the first place would carry more weight.

 

1. It's showbiz. Don't let what you see in front of the curtain become confused with the amount of hard work necessary behind the scenes.

 

Interesting way to begin. It's not showbiz, it's journalism. Secondly, you're shifting the goalposts. If you pay attention, a lot of the complaints and criticisms of MR have nothing whatsoever to do with the back house operations or grunt work; it's the people at the front end and top of the chain and how they execute their duties and perform their roles.

 

5. Ever thought that John Rimington may have borne a grudge before he set off for down under? I don't remember how we reported the Braddan story, but I seem to remember the whole topic was much closer to his heart than mine, before he was voted out of public office anyway for saying that 'pensioners were a drain on society' – widely reported IIRC by both Manx Radio and IOM Newspapers.

 

It's pretty irrelevent why he said what he said and especially irrelevant verging on a smear to go into what he's said on other matters and speculation on why he was voted out. This part of your response goes someway to demonstrating exactly what's wrong with Manx Radio and doesn't make you look particularly good. Criticism comes your way, and you cast aspersions: Oh he's got a grudge, and he's a right bastard to boot. People on here criticise MR, but then they're just a bunch of ignorant nutters on the local forum. Former employers saying bad things about MR? Well they can't possibly be reliable and must be telling a pack of lies.

 

Your entire defence is, rather than meeting or engaging in specific points, centred on vague notions of being value for money, telling people how they should feel, and stating blithely the ignorance or bias of anyone who has the temerity to complain or criticize. I'm sorry Stu, but to play you at your own game: it's telling that your background is PR and marketing, rather than journalism.

 

None of us minds constructive criticism – but these threads are often just destructive and nasty, and reasoned (if at all) from a purely subjective and personal point of view. Things like 'I've spoken to a few former employees of the station and the picture is pretty grim' add little – what do you EXPECT of 'former employees'?

 

Perhaps there would be a lot more in the way of constructive criticism if anyone thought it would do the damndest bit of good. But when we meet petulance and the kind of PR stonewalling that's almost your trademark on this matter, it's not hard to see why people get frustrated and decide to have a pop instead.

 

We make mistakes, but we're constantly trying to do better, we know that whatever we do could never satisfy all the people all the time, but the alternative is another computerised jukebox in an age when most people have their own personal music player anyway. Be careful what you wish for.

 

...and if all else fails, come with a hypothetical situation in which things are apparently much worse.

 

As far as I'm concerned, given the quality of analysis, interviews and commentary available on MR, I'd prefer (and have said as much previously) 'another computerised jukebox' to seeing MR continue masquerading as a national broadcaster.

 

Seconded - vinnieK's comments

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Were MR seen to provide a valuable service I think giving them the money coming from the BBC would be more justifiable.

 

Would it?

 

This money, our money, has been given to MR without any consultation with ourselves. While it is traditional that the Govt spend our Taxes on schemes which we may not agree with, we know that our taxes are our contribution to the Govt to govern. It is unlikely that we will all agree with the way in which the Govt decide to spend our taxes.

 

We pay our TV licence to recieve BBC stations and the transmitter services that the BBC offer to other broadcasters, it is our money and if there is to be a refund, then it is due to us not our Govt to do with as they wish.

 

The BBC are hardly blameless in this, what were they thinking of in giving our licence fee refund to someone other than ourselves?

 

This is somewhat akin to taking a shirt back to Marks & Spencer only for them to say that they will give the refund to MR. Would we put up with that?

 

Is it possible that this is misappropriation, fraud or theft?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a siverhead come-over, who regardless of all the posts on this topic thinks that MR is a quality service.I am a great fan of Stu Peters and the way he presents Talkin Heads, not overkeen on his Saturday rock prog (that,s just personal taste). What I do object to is the way Bob Harrison (especially) and Bernie Quayle have been kicked into touch,quality gone to waste.

Stu is bob on when he makes his comments on how Athol Radio (3fm) managed to get a licence to broadcast, when the island had two good stations already.I also think that the Monnoian line is a very good current affairs and Mr Watterson is top dollar!!!!

Oh Watterson sure is top dollar,most of the program is his voice droning on and on,I like the bit when he says,"Well thanks for the comments,now we have a few people waiting on line",and then goes into conversation with whoever is sitting in the studio with him,while these people are waiting to talk.

David Callister ran it better,more people talking on line,less chatter in the studio,they have had an hour previous to talk,so lets have more people talk and less from the studio.

With the election coming up there might be a couple of DJs looking for a job up there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a siverhead come-over, who regardless of all the posts on this topic thinks that MR is a quality service.I am a great fan of Stu Peters and the way he presents Talkin Heads, not overkeen on his Saturday rock prog (that,s just personal taste). What I do object to is the way Bob Harrison (especially) and Bernie Quayle have been kicked into touch,quality gone to waste.

Stu is bob on when he makes his comments on how Athol Radio (3fm) managed to get a licence to broadcast, when the island had two good stations already.I also think that the Monnoian line is a very good current affairs and Mr Watterson is top dollar!!!!

Oh Watterson sure is top dollar,most of the program is his voice droning on and on,I like the bit when he says,"Well thanks for the comments,now we have a few people waiting on line",and then goes into conversation with whoever is sitting in the studio with him,while these people are waiting to talk.

David Callister ran it better,more people talking on line,less chatter in the studio,they have had an hour previous to talk,so lets have more people talk and less from the studio.

With the election coming up there might be a couple of DJs looking for a job up there.

To be fair, it is clear that frequently they have no callers to put to air and - for some reason - everyone seems to call up in the last 5 minutes. You seem to get a totally different feel and different callers coming on when Stu Peters is doing it. I can put up with a lot that MR does but the usual turn off is the godawful adverts some of which have been running unaltered for more than 20 years. Is it me or do MR adverts grate more than those on other stations or is it just that there are so many of them? Is hearing "when you save a little money it means a lot these days" for the millionth time going to make anyone more likely to buy whatever it is they are selling? And someone really should have a word in the ear of the jeweller who thinks it's a good idea to read his own ad.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The news and documentary content is the only bit which matters. 3FM and Energy perfectly adequately provide easy listening, MOR, pop music etc for the sort of people who want noise on in the background. MR would not be the first choice for anyone who is interested in classical music or jazz.

 

The govt money could be much better spent producing content for free syndication via the two commercial stations and via the internet. There is no need to be paying for broadcasting infrastructure. I have no doubt that that the other stations could be persuaded to broadcast the govt subsidised content.

 

Another vote for funding local interest content only: say an hour of news content and an hour of 'other programming' each day and delivering it through existing distribution channels.

 

 

I think it would be preferable to pay a higher hourly rate for 730 hours of quality material each year than a much lower hourly rate for 6935 hours of stuff which is already adequately served by other channels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A 'Public Media Fund' is the answer. It would cost less than Manx Radio and would produce more varied content. It would probably sound more professional too, because the bunch up at MR are hardly at the cutting edge of media production and tech. You could separate out the newsroom and fund that from taxation, with their content being provided free of charge to all local media outlets (and for sale to the BBC and ITV regionals where appropriate).

 

If Manx Radio wanted to keep broadcasting, they could do so under the same real world pressures as the other media outlets. The public would be serviced, the plurality of media outlets would be preserved, the cost would be reduced and real 'social media' could grow on the island.

Edited by parchedpeas
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know about the salaries and the excess department heads at Manx Radio but I do know that in Canada the government of the day (read religious right wing neocon) is driving the CBC into obliviation by starving it for funding. Pretty soon we will have no choice but sh*tty commercial mindless radio stations all owned by the same 3 people who own the television networks, newspapers and the cable & phone companies. Of course we do have choice, we can also have our culture drowned out by mindless crappy americian programming and right wing rantings.

 

You still have a broadcaster that is getting support. Be happy somebody still knows you are still alive. I suggest you get Manx Radio's affairs put in order, keep your radio station funding and don't get the service killed by to much whining. Or maybe you're like many 'wannabe American' Canadians who don't know they have an identity and think the English point of view should drowned out the Manx.

Edited by gragor
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Were MR seen to provide a valuable service I think giving them the money coming from the BBC would be more justifiable.

 

Would it?

 

This money, our money, has been given to MR without any consultation with ourselves. While it is traditional that the Govt spend our Taxes on schemes which we may not agree with, we know that our taxes are our contribution to the Govt to govern. It is unlikely that we will all agree with the way in which the Govt decide to spend our taxes.

 

We pay our TV licence to recieve BBC stations and the transmitter services that the BBC offer to other broadcasters, it is our money and if there is to be a refund, then it is due to us not our Govt to do with as they wish.

 

The BBC are hardly blameless in this, what were they thinking of in giving our licence fee refund to someone other than ourselves?

 

This is somewhat akin to taking a shirt back to Marks & Spencer only for them to say that they will give the refund to MR. Would we put up with that?

 

Is it possible that this is misappropriation, fraud or theft?

 

I agree. Can we sue?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You still have a broadcaster that is getting support. Be happy somebody still knows you are still alive. I suggest you get Manx Radio's affairs put in order, keep your radio station funding and don't get the service killed by to much whining.

 

A couple have already said they'd be happy for MR to receive more money if it was accompanied by an improvement in quality. It's also already been suggested that instead of funding MR directly, the public interest programming itself be funded, be that on Manx Radio or one of our other local radio stations such as Energy or 3fm.

 

Or maybe you're like many 'wannabe American' Canadians who don't know they have an identity and think the English point of view should drowned out the Manx.

 

Well, naturally everyone envies the English in so much as few nationalities look quite so dapper in a bowler hat and with a carnation in their button hole. Nevertheless, I'm not sure how you've dredged up that bit of speculation from the discussion that's been had on here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Genuine questions Vinnie - how do you measure quality broadcasting? What/who would you cite as a yardstick, a good example of doing a better job in a similar market and with similar resources?

 

And has anyone wondered whether Energy or 3FM would WANT to carry public service/minority interest programming? And apart from the destruction of Manx Radio, what would the benefit be - would it be cheaper to pay us to make programmes for other stations? Would there be enough demand to make it financially worthwhile for a producer?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Genuine questions Vinnie - how do you measure quality broadcasting? What/who would you cite as a yardstick, a good example of doing a better job in a similar market and with similar resources?

 

Sorry, when I speak of quality I'm referring explicitly to how current affairs, commentary and interviews are handled. I feel that looking for a yardstick is something of a red herring: you're asking for a comparison that in effect is difficult to formulate because our situation is relatively rare, being that of requiring a 'national' approach to News, with all the rigour that entails, yet having the population of a small town.

 

Nevertheless, I still think it's possible to identify where improvements could be made in terms of quality without having to reach for such a comparison. In essence, my view is that quality could be improved simply by those involved conducting more thorough research, and thinking a little bit more about what obligations and duties the role they occupy demands of them, and I think this could easily be done with present resources (even if an ideal solution were for presenters to work in tandem with a couple of dedicated researchers).

 

An example of the kind of basic research that anyone commenting on current affairs or conducting interviews should be doing all the time is to scour the hansards. To go through identifying the issues, charting their history and origins (not always as obvious as they may seem), implications, how the political culture is dealing with them, and analysing it both on its own and in a wider context. If information isn't available, ask for it, if it's not forthcoming ask why not and make that a focus of your analysis and a feature of the interview. Before the spectre of Paxman is invoked, that's not what I'm asking for: There's a sharp distinction between aggressive (which I agree with you is counterproductive), and informed and directed.

 

Take for example the Freedom of Information bill. One thing we rarely, if ever hear about is that although the Chief Minister is keen to reassure us in its absence by pointing to the existing, fifteen year old Code of Practice, the very motivation behind introducing legislation (as voiced during Gelling's government) was to counter serious shortcomings identified in that self same Code in the wake of the Mount Murray report.

 

Other considerations that should be taken into account abound. For example take your interview with Richard Butt. I am in no way insinuating there was anything cosy or dodgy about it, but the simple fact is that you interviewing a man who paid you to write columns in the newspaper he edits is a clear conflict of interest that should have been avoided, as was using that column to defend and promote your other employers at Manx radio.

 

Perhaps I sound a little strident and inflexible, but you are, as you say yourself, part of a 'national institution'. That and the journalistic nature of your work means that you should strive to be above reproach and do everything in your power to live up to the kind of standards people would expect of such a body. Putting forward your own opinion, interrupting and imposing that view on those calling into the show, having a bit of a dig at critics on air et al is fine and entertaining in a certain context, but not that of current affairs and talking about serious issues.

 

**ANOTHER**IRRELEVANT**RANT**FROM**VINNIEK**

 

On a side note (hence the asterisks), in your final column you say that the Isle of Man suffers from a default cynicism towards it's politicians, judiciary, and the English. With no small risk of laying myself open to the charge of a degree of mawkishness that's unbecoming of a self confessed forum bastard let me say this much: My criticism is not motivated by cynicism, and I'd say that the same applies to a fair few who you may view as falling into that stereotype.

 

My criticism of the Government, Manx Radio and the Newspapers originates in the simple fact that the Island is my home. It's more than just a 'great place', or a decent place to live and work, or is the romanticised bastion of freedom and independence it's sometimes vaunted as: it's where I was born, where I intend to raise my family and where I hope to spend the rest of my days. I love it and it honestly comes close to breaking my heart to see how government conducts itself, how the inefficiencies and brazen flaws of our political system hinder us, and how infrequently and often how inexpertly, to the point complacence, our media attempts to hold them to account, inform the public and live up to the fundamental role democracy insists it performs.

 

Looking back, I initially joined these forums more out of a sense of nostalgia and a tinge of home sickness than a deep seated interest in local news, and if anything my position was centred largely in ignorance and a fair degree of apathy towards such issues than it was a product of cynicism. Instead, the views I hold now, having tried to understand the Island's situation to the best of my abilities, and the critisms I voice with regards to the Island's politics and its media originate in nothing less than disappointment and a sincere fear for what the future holds.

 

For example, my heart sank when I heard Watterson so unselfconsciously conducting an interview with the Douglas East candidates so frivolous and disgraceful in its one sidedness that you had even established MR supporters expressing their dismay on here.

 

In no small measure, that sentiment is why I'm giving you and MR a bit of a hard time, and, since at present there seems to be little indication of anything changing, probably why I'll continue to do so.

Edited by VinnieK
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...