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Holy Ghost


Karellen
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Its a long time since I shed the cloak of religious indoctrination, but watching the recent Royal Wedding on the news, the priest uttered this term a few times. Its a term I have heard before, as a child many years ago, but with the passing of time I was struck by what an absurd concept it is. A "holy ghost" , I kept expecting it to fly down the church making scary noises, above the heads of the guests, Hogwarts style.

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I don't think it is a protestant /catholic denominational thing, but a which version of the bible/prayer book do you use thing. The two may correlate to denominations but also to generations.

 

The King James bible (from early C17) uses the term holy ghost with one or two exceptions when it uses spirit. Gast is the old english for spirit

 

The New Jeruslam Bible, which I understand is the english language version used in catholic churches in the UK, but not in the US, dates to 1985, hardly surprising the language is updated at nearly 400 years apart, and more if you think that the KJV was not wholly a new translation but used about 80% of an edition published and translated 50 years before (the Geneva or Breeches bible)

 

The service would have been using the book of common prayer for its basis with one or two modernisations, I presume, so that is why ghost was used.

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"The charity of God", says St. Paul (Romans 5:5), "is poured forth in our hearts by the Holy Ghost who is give to us." In that passage the Paraclete is both the giver and the gift: the giver of grace (donum creatum) and the gift of the Father and the Son (donum increatum). St. Paul teaches repeatedly that the Holy Ghost dwells in us (Romans 8:9, 11; 1 Corinthians 3:16).

 

And then there is this:

Anybody who was dragged kicking and screaming through the torture of St Mary's will remember it.

 

Come, Holy Ghost, Creator, come

Confirmation Hymn Lyrics

 

 

Come, Holy Ghost, Creator, come,

From thy bright heav’nly throne,

Come take possession of our souls,

And make them all thy own.

 

Thou who art called the Paraclete,

Best gift of God above,

The living spring, the living fire,

Sweet unction and true love.

 

Thou who art sevenfold in thy grace,

Finger of God’s right hand

His promise teaching little ones

To speak an understand.

 

O guide our minds with thy blessed light,

With love our hearts inflame;

And with thy strength, which never decays

Confirm our mortal frame.

 

Far from us drive our deadly foe;

True peach unto us bring;

And through all perils lead us safe

Beneath thy sacred wing.

 

Through thee may we the Father know,

Through thee the eternal Son,

And thee, the Spirit of them both,

Thrice-blessed Three in One.

 

All glory to the Father be,

With his coequal Son;

The same to thee, great Paraclete,

While endless ages run.

 

Amen.

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yes Topaz, but you miss the point. Depends which version of the bible you use, and different denominations and even churches within denominations, habitually use different versions, and even hymns are denominational, It confused me as a boy that we sang different hymns at C of E primary to Methodist Sunday schools or even worse same hymn words and different tunes.

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....that is why ghost was used.

Isn't that why Rolls Royce have had both Ghosts and Spirits? To cater for all royal religious tastes.

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The Holy Ghost / Spirit is the third part of the Trinity that constitutes Our Lord, the other two being The Father (creator) and The Son, God amongst man.

 

The Holy Ghost is the spirit of the Lord that enters man when he comes to The Lord through the teaching and acceptance of The Yoke and Salvation of and through Jesus.

 

It means the state of mind when one knows the right thing to do in order to act as closely to the manner in which Jesus would act in given circumstances.

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So from recent posts in other threads it doesn't appear to be something many christians who post on here are possessed of/by.

 

Can we be clear what a yoke is as well? Seems to be a metaphor for total submission and obedience i.e. not thinking for yourself at all.

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So from recent posts in other threads it doesn't appear to be something many christians who post on here are possessed of/by.

 

Can we be clear what a yoke is as well? Seems to be a metaphor for total submission and obedience i.e. not thinking for yourself at all.

 

 

Read Matthew 11:28-30.

 

In olden times it was the custom to use a yoke (a form of coupling between two animals) as a means of training a young and inexperienced beast by it being linked with an older and experienced animal. In that way the young animal would have a lighter load and moreover should it stumble the older experienced beast would be there to help it.

 

It is in this context that Jesus uses the word. Yoke is a word that finds much use in the bible, usually as a form of oppression and so by using the word in the way that it appears in Matthew 11 it emphasises that the constraints that are put upon someone who has accepted salvation are not only very light but very soon become no constraint at all.

 

I seriously wonder just what is being taught in our schools these days if the level of understanding of Christianity is as deplorable as it would seem to be based on the gross ignorance shown on this forum. I also wonder how the Bishops, both past and present DARE to show their faces in light of this.

 

What have they been doing?

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In ancient times a yoke was a symbol of complete subservience and it was customary to make a defeated army walk beneath a symbolic yoke in acceptance of defeat (something that fascinated Robert Graves when he saw an engraving of Roman soldiers being made to do so by Etruscans. He mentions it more than once in his Claudius novels).

I believe the archway of sabres at a military wedding is a remnant of this! :D

 

Even if the "yoke is easy, and my burden is light" there can be little doubt that it refers to surrender of independence and acceptance of subservience.

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yes Topaz, but you miss the point. Depends which version of the bible you use, and different denominations and even churches within denominations, habitually use different versions, and even hymns are denominational, It confused me as a boy that we sang different hymns at C of E primary to Methodist Sunday schools or even worse same hymn words and different tunes.

 

Mea Culpa, mea culpa mea maxima culpa. ( I'm always having to do that!)

I usualy do miss the point, John, probably because my thoughts have jumped to something else loosely connected.

As a child I was facinated by the Paraclete, I thought it was a big multi coloured feathered thing that would swoop in and carry me off. My father let me think that until I was about eight.

 

Dominus vobiscum.

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Mea Culpa, mea culpa mea maxima culpa. ( I'm always having to do that!)

I usualy do miss the point, John, probably because my thoughts have jumped to something else loosely connected.

As a child I was facinated by the Paraclete, I thought it was a big multi coloured feathered thing that would swoop in and carry me off. My father let me think that until I was about eight.

 

Dominus vobiscum.

In nomine Patris et fillii et Spiritus Sancti. (You weren't the only one to suffer, Topaz!)

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