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You Must Speak Ze English, Ja!


Amadeus
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Read it again. It says quite clearly, that there are "some provisions in the UK Rules that do not apply here and some in the Isle of Man Rules that do not apply in the UK".

 

In any case, you do not obtain a seperate UK visa. So long as you have obtained an IOM visa, you will be allowed through the UK onward to the Isle of Man.

 

Do you have any experience of this hboy?

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Other nationals wishing to settle in the Isle of Man should make an application to their local British Embassy, High Commission or Consulate which will send the application to the Isle of Man for a decision. The immigration requirements of the Isle of Man are very similar to those of the UK.

 

 

Where does it say in that paragraph that you need a UK visa before you can obtain an IOM visa??

 

I can tell you now, I have been involved in the VISA process for 4 Africans.. two of which I had to launch an appeal (and won). All of which entered the IOM without a seperate visa for UK.

 

You only need apply for an visa to enter the IOM - not to 'enter the UK'. Once you have an IOM visa, you will be permitted to pass through UK imigration.

 

edit: hboy has since deleted his comments above to which this post responds, but I will keep these comments for the sake of clarity.

Edited by DjDan
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Remember, that to gain 'entry' to the IOM, you have to transit via the UK first, so if we didn't follow 'their' rules, they could simply turn them away at their border controls anyway. We are stuck with this I'm afraid.

Has the Racket finally stopped the Dublin boat ?

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I can tell you now, I have been involved in the VISA process for 4 Africans.. two of which I had to launch an appeal (and won). All of which entered the IOM without a seperate visa for UK.

 

Are you a people smuggler?

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I can tell you now, I have been involved in the VISA process for 4 Africans.. two of which I had to launch an appeal (and won). All of which entered the IOM without a seperate visa for UK.

 

Are you a people smuggler?

 

haha. Don't need to smuggle.. just follow the immigration rules ;)

 

All four are family.

 

Are you the Manx Transporter?

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I can tell you now, I have been involved in the VISA process for 4 Africans.. two of which I had to launch an appeal (and won). All of which entered the IOM without a seperate visa for UK.

 

Are you a people smuggler?

 

haha. Don't need to smuggle.. just follow the immigration rules ;)

 

All four are family.

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Remember, that to gain 'entry' to the IOM, you have to transit via the UK first, so if we didn't follow 'their' rules, they could simply turn them away at their border controls anyway.

 

Not necessarily the case. The IOM has its own immigration rules (though by in large they tie in with the UK), and so long as you have been permitted access to the IOM, the UK will not turn you away. In any case, they can verify your status with the IOM immigration officials if required before allowing you through.

Which was kind of the point I was trying to make. Yes, there are seperate Immigration laws, but they are almost identical to the UK, bar some issues on Asylum and other things.

 

I was making the point that we couldn't just go it alone on Immigration policy as the UK would not tolerate a lesser system, as entry into the UK (or Eire as Frances points out) is pre-requisite prior to getting here. And once here, people are free to re-enter the UK without further Border Controls.

 

Ergo, they bring in English language requirements, so do we.

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LDV I agree with you too on this issue and well said.

 

I think we all sort of know that this island is institutionally racist, just when they actually introduce rules that confirm that, it is still a bit of a shock.

The Island is little different from other countries. It's happening all over the world. People are less free to move cross borders. And some people call this a global world.
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I think we all sort of know that this island is institutionally racist, just when they actually introduce rules that confirm that, it is still a bit of a shock.

 

Utter crap, your posts just get more sad and pathetic as the weeks pass. If you move to a country that speaks a certain language making a success of yourself involves having to learn that language to get by. Making that a requirement seems reasonable in order that any newcomers are positioned to take best advantage of any opportunities that arise. If I moved to France to work for a French company I wouldn't expect to get very far with my career if I didn't speak French. I don't see that this is any different. Too many bleeding heart liberal w@nkers posting on here blubbing about inequality. True Manx people still have no legal right to work in the EU but nothing is done about that whilst all the comeovers sit here blubbing about institutional racism. Get a life. Your talking shite.

Edited by hboy
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i am happy to hear this news. my father is on a ward in nobles, has been for 6 months. and we hardly see a fluent English speaking worker there. yes there is harm in this.. even one day a woman could not understand what time it was when a time on my fathers charts was written as 15 hundred hours.. we had to take her over to the clock and count it with her for her to understand. i have been asked if i was my fathers son, and i have been told my father had been tested for MS, when they meant MRSA. and those are just some of my encounters, my dad has stories of things almost daily.

in my mind if you cannot speak AND understand English FULLY you should not be working on a medical ward and caring for patients on a daily basis. how can you be sure that the patient can fully understand what is happening to them, and how can you fully understand what action is needed if you cant understand the language?

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Sorry Jennybrew, but I do wonder why people don't value their own freedom and treat others with such scant regard when I read post like yours.

 

You mention something of serious concern, i.e. your father has had difficulties communicating with the hospital staff.

That's not good at all. And if people cannot offer good service to their patients (which I assume means communicating with them sufficiently) then they shouldn't be doing that job.

 

But even though your story about your father shows problems in the Hospital it doesn't justify an immigration policy such as this. It's not right to stop moving here just because they don't speak English.

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It's unlikely that this law will make any difference at the hospital anyway. It's to force people who marry locals to complete an English exam before they can live here. That'll be everyday English the equivillant of the stuff we learned in French at school not detailed medical stuff.

 

Surely the way to fix problems in the hospital is to make proficiency in Engliah a requirement of the job not applying a spurious test to a small section of immigrants most of whom will never work in the hospital.

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I have *some* sympathy with your points hboy although I might have phrased them better :) however

True Manx people still have no legal right to work in the EU but nothing is done about that

Whilst true, in reality there is no real difference between a UK born or Manx born applying for a job in the EU. The only difference is 'no automatic right' which is not the same as 'no right'.

 

There should be no bar to anyone coming to the UK or IOM if they work and pay taxes. Unfortunately some have no intention of working and this gives all the usual bigots every excuse they need to spew their racist ideas. One big difference of the UK/IOM (and maybe EI) is the automatic access to services and rights of the locals once here, contributing or not. That doesn't happen for non-workers in other countries. This is the main reason why many are 'queuing at the door'. However, providing someone will work (and most do, probably harder than us) and pay taxes etc, then I have no problem with them living here or the UK. Race, colour or country of origin have nothing to do with it. Having said that, language is essential for integration and to avoid the previously described ghettos from developing. This law seems to be a very blunt edged instrument to ensure that.

 

There will obviously be examples of jobs where language skills are crucial. I would expect regulatory authority and procedure to ensure that such jobs are not affected by reduced language skills of newcomers.

Edited by ballaughbiker
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LDV I agree with you too on this issue and well said.

 

I think we all sort of know that this island is institutionally racist, just when they actually introduce rules that confirm that, it is still a bit of a shock.

The Island is little different from other countries. It's happening all over the world. People are less free to move cross borders. And some people call this a global world.

 

It is not and should not be a "global world".

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