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National Speed Limit

Do We Need a National Speed Limit? (assume that it will be enforced by the police)  

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cambon

 

It isn't technology for technology's sake. It is not experimental. The Co-op are already using it. It also ties in with tracking of your vehicle when stolen and it not only measures speed and location, but heavy braking. Fitting the unit is about £120.

 

A safe driver will save more than that in the first years premiums.

 

Motor Insurance has gone through the roof. Due to two things, higher cost of claims and uninsured drivers. This should allocate premiums to those who pose the highest risk. Putting Third Party onto Road tax would not stop the uninsured drivers. There are more untaxed cars in IOM than uninsured. In UK of course you have to tax, or SORN. To tax you have to insure and have an MOT. We do not have the same system here.

 

The reason that 10p on a litre is not the way forward is that different vehicles have different fuel economies, different drivers drive differently. Tax on fuel taxes fuel consumption, what I suggest taxes road usage, two different things.

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I know its a Wikipedia page but....

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_limit

 

Most interesting are the tables showing the effects of decreased speed limits and increased speed limits.

 

Edit to add:

 

Re-read the page and this statistic jumped out:

 

"'20 mph speed limit zones' which use self enforcing traffic calming achieved average speed reductions of 10 mph, child pedestrian accidents were reduced by 70% and child cyclist accidents by 48%."

Edited by MilitantDogOwner

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Surely, when a limit is posted, tests have been done to decide upon a limit.

Edited by woolley

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Surely, when a limit is posted, tests have been done to decide upon a limit.

 

Well if they are, they are not very good at it. Remember when a route is deristricted it means just that in that there is no official speed limit laid down. It doesn't mean you can drive like a lunatic at any speed you like. The idea is that you use your brain and drive according to the road and conditions which is as it should be. A good example would be the coast road from Howstrake to Liverpool Arms which was deristricted so you could do say 50 or 60 on the long straight stretches but you would have to slow down to 15 or 20 on the tight viaduct over Groudle Glen. Lo and behold, some bright spark decides they will put a 40mph limit all the way. Seeing the 40 sign, a stranger would be entitled to expect that road to be up to 40mph standard for the distance it is in force. Clearly not the case. Eejits.

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Seeing the 40 sign, a stranger would be entitled to expect that road to be up to 40mph standard for the distance it is in force. Clearly not the case. Eejits.

 

Then that person should not be driving.

 

The posted 40 limit is a maximum along that stretch of road. It is the drivers responsibility to drive to the road and the road conditions and adjust their speed accordingly.

Exactly. As is the case on the previous derestriction so no point in having the 40.

Edited by woolley

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Seeing the 40 sign, a stranger would be entitled to expect that road to be up to 40mph standard for the distance it is in force. Clearly not the case. Eejits.

 

Then that person should not be driving.

 

The posted 40 limit is a maximum along that stretch of road. It is the drivers responsibility to drive to the road and the road conditions and adjust their speed accordingly.

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"'20 mph speed limit zones' which use self enforcing traffic calming achieved average speed reductions of 10 mph, child pedestrian accidents were reduced by 70% and child cyclist accidents by 48%."

you missed the key point that merely creating a 20mph zone via signage alone had no effect - physical measures (ie the self enforcement) had to be in place - my continual gripe about the Island racetrack is that such measures cannot be used in many places where they would be useful - signage alone is useless - engineering + enforcement along with education are needed if the Islands poor RTC fatality/serious injury statistics are to be reduced to say the UK average let alone comparable areas such as Isle of Wight

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I would imagine it's because the vast majority agree with the limit and can see why it's there, so they obey it.

 

Put a 60mph limit on a road where people feel they can safely go much faster then it's much more likely to be disregarded.

 

I can see how that's an argument about what the limit should be, not an argument for there not to be a limit at all.

 

 

I think the reality is though that any limit would be significantly below what a lot of people would think necessary. Say it's 70mph on the mountain for example, people are going to have less qualms going 90mph there than they would exceeding a speed limit outside a school by a far smaller margin.

 

Again, I'm talking here in terms of why limits would not be as effective as they are in the school example.

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That comes on to Road Tax. One poster says my suggestion would hit him as he has 2 cars and a number of vintage bikes. How will it hit him? Unless he drives/rides thousands of miles per year. It will save motoring costs for low mileage road users and put the road usage cost onto those who drive more and cause more wear to the roads.

If this sort of approach was to be looked into, why not scrap road tax altogether and just add 10P per litre (or whatever) to petrol. Very simple and the user pays, including visitors, etc.

Sound idea ,I don't expect the government will provide these "sat trackers" for free. Many vintage bike owners will only do a few hundred miles a year in total on all their machines and may choose to keep their bikes as static exibits if this idea is put into practice. Mind you if some old boy such as myself ends up in court as a result of misunderstanding a system such as that proposed the advocates could end up with a nice little earner.I have a son who is a barrister on another island and as far as they are concerned the more legislation the better!

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As a cyclist I can't see what possible difference a national speed limit will make to me. Each time a car has hit me it has been in a restricted area. I know it's a generalisation but by and large I have less problems with car drivers in the derestriced areas than inside them.

 

In which case I guess I should vote no as I'll be safer.

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"'20 mph speed limit zones' which use self enforcing traffic calming achieved average speed reductions of 10 mph, child pedestrian accidents were reduced by 70% and child cyclist accidents by 48%."

you missed the key point that merely creating a 20mph zone via signage alone had no effect - physical measures (ie the self enforcement) had to be in place - my continual gripe about the Island racetrack is that such measures cannot be used in many places where they would be useful - signage alone is useless - engineering + enforcement along with education are needed if the Islands poor RTC fatality/serious injury statistics are to be reduced to say the UK average let alone comparable areas such as Isle of Wight

I've yet to see the statistics that show our roads are more dangerous than the UK, what do you base these on?

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"'20 mph speed limit zones' which use self enforcing traffic calming achieved average speed reductions of 10 mph, child pedestrian accidents were reduced by 70% and child cyclist accidents by 48%."

you missed the key point that merely creating a 20mph zone via signage alone had no effect - physical measures (ie the self enforcement) had to be in place - my continual gripe about the Island racetrack is that such measures cannot be used in many places where they would be useful - signage alone is useless - engineering + enforcement along with education are needed if the Islands poor RTC fatality/serious injury statistics are to be reduced to say the UK average let alone comparable areas such as Isle of Wight

I've yet to see the statistics that show our roads are more dangerous than the UK, what do you base these on?

 

 

Roads will be dangerous for his mangy mut if i see it, road kill.

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Wonder how many times MDo and Co have signed up with alts to vote :P

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Wonder how many times MDo and Co have signed up with alts to vote :P

Don't judge us by your own standards!

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Wonder how many times MDo and Co have signed up with alts to vote :P

Don't judge us by your own standards!

Yawn!

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