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Tragic death of a cyclist out on a training run Greeba way when a wheel (allegedly still bolted to its hub) fell off a passing wagon?

 

I don't have strong views on this issue one way or another, but wouldn't that wagon have been subject to the mandatory checks referred to by x-in-man above?

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Tragic death of a cyclist out on a training run Greeba way when a wheel (allegedly still bolted to its hub) fell off a passing wagon?

 

I don't have strong views on this issue one way or another, but wouldn't that wagon have been subject to the mandatory checks referred to by x-in-man above?

 

Yes it was and still would be.

 

As far as i'm aware it was the garage who was found at fault?, for not putting the wheel on tight enough?

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I was told that it is "advisable" rather than strictly necessary for an EU country

Hmmm, don't think so although I'm not sure the local plod would know the difference. In Sarko's république you are required to carry your driving licence at all times you are driving and they expect to see a licence in the EU format along with a circle of stars on a blue background. The photocard manx licence meets the first criterion but not the second.

 

I can't remember the last time I heard of an accident caused by a defective vehicle.

Tragic death of a cyclist out on a training run Greeba way when a wheel (allegedly still bolted to its hub) fell off a passing wagon?

 

On a wagon that was covered by an yearly MOT ....

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I was told that it is "advisable" rather than strictly necessary for an EU country

Hmmm, don't think so although I'm not sure the local plod would know the difference. In Sarko's république you are required to carry your driving licence at all times you are driving and they expect to see a licence in the EU format along with a circle of stars on a blue background. The photocard manx licence meets the first criterion but not the second.

 

I can't remember the last time I heard of an accident caused by a defective vehicle.

Tragic death of a cyclist out on a training run Greeba way when a wheel (allegedly still bolted to its hub) fell off a passing wagon?

 

On a wagon that was covered by an yearly MOT ....

No it wasn't, the yearly tests came in AFTER the accident. No amount of govenment or agency testing would of stopped this accident from hapening. The wheel had been changed the day before, not by a garage but by two blokes working at the owners yard, and for some reason it came loose. Roadside tests are the way to go, the examiner who looked at the wagon after the crash said that if it had been subject to a roadside test, it would of been removed from the road. No one can prepare for roadside tests other than to keep the vehicle in tip top condition all year round. I know of operators who swap wheels round between them just for test day, and jet wash any leaks away just before they take the truck up the center.

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MOTs don't really help. It does not prevent lights from blowing, tyres and brakes from wearing, etc. It does, however, pick up issues like worn steering or suspension, But, so does an annual service.

 

The system used here (and in Jersey, Guernsey) of road checks and heavy fines are a far more effective way of dealing with the problem - and drunk driving at the same time,

 

From what I have read, defective vehicles do not contribute massively to the number of crashes over here, so any government investment in MOTs would be about as useful and welcome as another runway extention or Richmond Hill. Totally pointless.

 

 

Hmmm, so because the MOT doesn't prevent lights from blowing, tyres or brake problems its not worth having it for more serious problems? Where's the logic in that? Annual services are not compulsory, MOTs are! (in the UK). It's a simple fix that gives the police an extra power to get unroadworthy vehicles off the road if the owners don't comply.

 

A relative of mine in the UK found out at an MOT he had a cracked rear spring, which he innocently wasn't aware of. Surely an annual check whether you call it an MOT or not is a good idea. How many people own a car but don't know how it works, a basic yearly safety check should be mandatory. The Isle of Man not wanting to introduce such a test just smacks of "not wanting to be like the UK" rather than common sense.

 

Say all you like about roadside checks being the answer. How often do the IOM police have these? What's safer, having your car checked vaguely by a cop at the roadside, or on a ramp at a garage? The fact is if the public don't have to test their vehicles in some manner for safety, they probably won't bother. The argument that a bulb could go as soon as the car is backed off the ramps is weak. Yes it could happen, but lights are visible, easily checked and fixed. Steering, suspension and brake problems can go ignored/undetected by the owner and probably only detected when the car has an accident or some sort of mechanical failure.

Edited by Pale Rider
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]

 

Steering, suspension and brake problems can go ignored/undetected by the owner and probably only detected when the car has an accident or some sort of mechanical failure.

 

Or they go about 3-6 months after the MOT and they drive around for 6-9 months with a dodgy car. back the start again really.

 

The main reason we dont have an MOT, and its nowt to do with "not being like the UK" is the simple fact we have no motoways, Because the chances of mechanical failure causing a major pile up at 70mph+ is well nil on the island. the fact we dont have vast open roads to sit at 70mph for hours on end, is the reason we dont have one. Because for most part our avrage speed will be between 20-40mph max on the island

Edited by gazza
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I'd be in favour of an MOT if it was priced fixed/we had the same offers as the Uk, I personally wouldn't mind paying £29 to be told whether what I was driving was safe or not!, Gazza whilst what you have said is correct, how many Manx cars go across to the UK motorways or further afield on European roads?, I think it'd make it a lot easier buying a UK car with UK mot and just getting it transferred to a Manx mot.

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... the fact we dont have vast open roads to sit at 70mph for hours on end, is the reason we dont have one. Because for most part our avrage speed will be between 20-40mph max on the island

 

I'm sure all the poor sods on the M6 and circumnavigating London at a crawl on the M25 would like a few miles of those vast open roads, Gazza!

 

It's starting, stopping and turning corners that requires brakes and steering, so with respect, I disagree. We also permit people to drive at unlimited speed on some of our country A roads, as opposed to 70 mph on much safer, less challenging, motorways.

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I'd be in favour of an MOT if it was priced fixed/we had the same offers as the Uk, I personally wouldn't mind paying £29 to be told whether what I was driving was safe or not!, Gazza whilst what you have said is correct, how many Manx cars go across to the UK motorways or further afield on European roads?, I think it'd make it a lot easier buying a UK car with UK mot and just getting it transferred to a Manx mot.

 

That is true about manx cars going away, but you would think anyone that isgoing away would have there car checked before they did, i know if im planning to go i get my car checked over to make sure its safe, more the fact of not having problems when i am over there stuck on the side of the hard sholder. its down to commen sence really.

 

... the fact we dont have vast open roads to sit at 70mph for hours on end, is the reason we dont have one. Because for most part our avrage speed will be between 20-40mph max on the island

 

I'm sure all the poor sods on the M6 and circumnavigating London at a crawl on the M25 would like a few miles of those vast open roads, Gazza!

 

It's starting, stopping and turning corners that requires brakes and steering, so with respect, I disagree. We also permit people to drive at unlimited speed on some of our country A roads, as opposed to 70 mph on much safer, less challenging, motorways.

 

yes while london and the M25, and a few junctions up the M6 are not what u call fast, the vast number of them are open and you can quite nicely sit at 70mph. Sio really using london as an expamle to say its the same as the island is really not the same.

 

Yes we let them drive at high speeds here, but take a look around, the few cars that u may think are un road worthy dont tend to be cars that can drive at high speed.

 

And i would like to add how can somebody say look at the cars we have on the road thay death traps, How on earth somebody can tell by looking at a car as it passes that its not road worthy is beyond me, do you all have magic eyes that can see they have defects as it drives past,

Yes you may see the odd one that looks bad, bit of rust here body panles bent etc. But the vast number of these are sound in the running gers, because they know the car its self looks tatty so they know they have more chance to be pulled in,

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Gazza I agree with what you wrote:

 

"how can somebody say look at the cars we have on the road thay death traps, How on earth somebody can tell by looking at a car as it passes that its not road worthy is beyond me, do you all have magic eyes that can see they have defects as it drives past"

 

That's why we should have a roadworthiness test.

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Some questions I'd like to add to the pot.

 

Having your car MOT'd would definitely create jobs (if you can get someone qualified), but could the garages keep up with demand and also have sufficient spares?

 

Would this create additional Civil service posts or would it just be added to persons doing road tax licences?

 

If the car is unroadworthy and the garage is unable to repair it there and then, would the garage have an adequate storage yard facility to keep the vehicles until repairs can be made and are the car owners provided with a vehicle whilst theirs is off the road?

 

I'm not saying that I'm not in favour of tests, as my car is maintained on a regular basis anyway and have the luxury of a relation who is a mechanic, but I'm very uncertain as to whether garages would be able to cope with demand.

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Manxy, if it was profitable work for garages, sure they'd cope with demand. They would hire accordingly. You wouldn't need many test stations, maybe Douglas, Ramsey and Castletown. Maybe even just one, in Douglas. I would say that the owner has to be responsible for removing failures if they choose not to get the failures fixed. The garage just tows it back to where it came from, or has it scrapped at the owners discretion.

Edited by guzzi
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i would like to add how can somebody say look at the cars we have on the road thay death traps, How on earth somebody can tell by looking at a car as it passes that its not road worthy is beyond me, do you all have magic eyes that can see they have defects as it drives past,

Yes you may see the odd one that looks bad, bit of rust here body panles bent etc. But the vast number of these are sound in the running gers, because they know the car its self looks tatty so they know they have more chance to be pulled in,

 

I looked at a Ford Transit van last week, was taxed for a fair while, chassis was completely rotten, opening the back doors you could see daylight all the way down the sides of the van, sills just crumbling away, this van was still in daily use by its owner, if we had an MOT it would've been fixed or off the road years ago. I've also known people who have never serviced their cars in 4-5 years, sometimes more, this would be stopped in an instant with an MOT test because of emissions testing.

 

Its nice not to have to pay for an MOT every year and get stung for all the (sometimes) trival things that wouldn't affect the cars driveabilty, but on the grounds of safety not having an MOT is lunacy.

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Manxy, if it was profitable work for garages, sure they'd cope with demand. They would hire accordingly. You wouldn't need many test stations, maybe Douglas, Ramsey and Castletown. Maybe even just one, in Douglas. I would say that the owner has to be responsible for removing failures if they choose not to get the failures fixed. The garage just tows it back to where it came from, or has it scrapped at the owners discretion.

Before I ramble on Guzzi, I'd like to know if anyone knows as to how many motor vehicles there roughly are on IOM?

I should also add -

How many garages are there in the IOM?

 

Welsh link re VOSA

Edited by manxy
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