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Gravy Train Gets New Engine?


Albert Tatlock
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To be honest it looks feckin awful. It's about 8ft wide and had the gauge altered to 3ft 6. Looks like it might fall over on the first corner.

 

I am not sure that it looks that bad, however, to answer AT it does fit on the rails. http://railequipmentsolutions.com/arrival-photos-project-550/

Thanks. But I didn't ask that.

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  • 1 month later...

Err!!

Wasn't it supposed to have been brought in to retrieve those broken down unreliable old coal fired Steam Engines.

 

Or was it the other way round??

Nearly everything these highly educated public sector experts touch seems to be turning to sh*t these days.

 

Pardon me sir,is that the Chattanoooga Poo Poo?

It's not going to town,cause it's it's bro-o-ken down Whoo whoo!!!

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I had heard that the engine is throwing oil as well as overheating (the two may well be related).

 

Also I have heard that the visibility is poor for shunting movements due to the driving position being central rather than at one side or ideally with a dual set of controls either side, it only has doors on one side of each cab making moving from one end to the other much more awkward and time consuming, it also does not fit one of Douglas stations engine release roads as it is too long.

 

The engine faults will presumably be under warranty, the other stuff lies in what was specified

 

 

Apart from that, all is well, lessons will have been learned etc etc

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I had heard that the engine is throwing oil as well as overheating (the two may well be related).

 

If the engine is leaking oil then it is most likely linked to the overheating. The manufacturer will be asked to put this right I am sure.

 

 

Also I have heard that the visibility is poor for shunting movements due to the driving position being central rather than at one side or ideally with a dual set of controls either side, it only has doors on one side of each cab making moving from one end to the other much more awkward and time consuming, it also does not fit one of Douglas stations engine release roads as it is too long.

 

Apparently the Railway were aware that it would not fit into one of the release roads at Douglas but I understand that they have a work around for that.

 

I am do not know what the specification said about the driver position but the central position would suggest that it was not specified. As the locomotive was produced in the US the driving position would normally be on the opposite side to that which is standard in the UK. (Yes railways also "drive" on the wrong side!) Therefore the central position could have been a result of the manufacturer providing a "neutral" position.

 

Again I understand that the railway staff are managing with the visibility problems.

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Like I said on the other thread, it'll be fine when they tell the fellas to stop piling coal under the engine every morning and setting fire to it. They're good lads down there, but a bit set in their ways. I'd love to know what the work around is for it not fitting one of the release roads. It wouldn't be having a steam loco on standby by any chance would it? Thus negating the entire rationale for having the diesel in the first place?

 

I do hope that the diesel power unit IS faulty and not simply unsuited to the application it has been used for. No. We couldn't be that stupid.

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Does anyone else wonder whether they decided not to pay too much attention to the specs? After all they had been refused permission to have the new toy they really wanted and told they had to 'make do' with a cheaper version at a mere £400k (though why they needed anything was never really explained). Maybe they got sulky and inattentive when it came to saying what was actually required.

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I'd love to know what the work around is for it not fitting one of the release roads. It wouldn't be having a steam loco on standby by any chance would it? Thus negating the entire rationale for having the diesel in the first place?

 

They are using No.18 Ailsa (the white monstrosity) to do the shunting in Douglas, however, that is limited to a very slow speed and is not suitable for "rescue missions" in the event of a steam locomotive failing.

 

 

Does anyone else wonder whether they decided not to pay too much attention to the specs?

 

I did see a long list of specifications somewhere so they did seem to put a lot of thought into it. If the drivers position/door locations were not specified then I suspect that they were an oversight. If I can remember where I saw the specs I will post it here.

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