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Gas Or Oil, Which Is Going To Be Cheaper In The Long Run


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I spoke to you yesterday ... Whatever you decide, please make sure you have all the information at hand before you decide and don't let that builder bully you into using his men unless you are sure that's what is best for you .... if nothing else wait until you have the cost for replacing the oil boiler ... It may be a little more to start with, but with proper maintenance they can last for years and serve you well :-)

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Cheapest option is - turn down the thermostat and put on a jumper

Sounds like some kind of fart fetish that.

Hello I have decided to definately replace my oil boiler, just need to decide gas or oil now. have oil now. hard decision but have to decide soon.

Solar was considered, but think that the costs for now would be too great, but maybe I can do solar at a later date.

I would ideally like to do solar for electric and heating, but need to look into this to see how much the solar would give in heating and energy.

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If you've got gas in the street outside your house now, I'd have gas. However oil boilers are considerably more efficient now that the old Pottertons and Triancos etc of 20+ years ago. We have cut our oil consumption about 30% but fitting a Worcester Bosch condensing oil and turning the stat down 1°. However oil boilers are bigger and noisier than gas and cost a lot more with probably more maintenance hence my original suggestion if you've got gas in your area, go for it.

 

One thing you need to decide now is whether you are going to store hot water. If you want to opt for solar in the future (and you would be crazy not to), then you need to keep that option. There are one or two makes of very efficient stainless mains pressure cylinders now. That means that you need to decide now whether to buy a combi or conventional. If you store hot water now, then obviously conventional. If you don't, buying a combi may restrict/complicate your use of solar in the future. If you're tempted to buy a replacement combi, then I'd advise changing to a new conventional boiler and a modern storage tank assuming there's somewhere to put the tank.

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Hello I have decided to definately replace my oil boiler, just need to decide gas or oil now. have oil now. hard decision but have to decide soon.

Solar was considered, but think that the costs for now would be too great, but maybe I can do solar at a later date.

I would ideally like to do solar for electric and heating, but need to look into this to see how much the solar would give in heating and energy.

 

I've seen second hand oil boilers very cheap, why not just buy one, get it fitted (fit yourself if you feel competent), gives you a chance to see where prices are going without spending a fortune on a new boiler you'll be stuck with for 10 years.

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I wouldn't recommend anyone attempt a DIY install of a boiler - not only dangerous but inefficient and will annul any home insurance policies should the worst happen.

The approach with the most flexibility, and really a bit of a must do to future proof whatever heat source you decide upon is to fit a thermal store, i.e Ecocat which you can probably find out about on the Internet - this will accept Gas, Oil, Heat Pump, Solar etc etc.

Solar PV vs Solar Thermal - solar thermal will give you the best return at present as the MEA's Home Generation tariff has a negative effect upon either solar PV or wind power at the moment.

If finances allow go for solar thermal from the start - probably one of the best returns on investment.

I would still consider a heat pump - lower running costs than the alternatives and other advantages not least of which is no annual maintenance required.

Just weigh up all the options - usually the more you invest up front the better the return so it's a trade off between capital and running costs.

Good luck.

Edited by Marc & Tricia
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Hello Marc and Tricia replied to me thanks for that, have sent them an email on their business site. would like to think solar was the way to go, but just think it will be too dear.

 

so think it will have to be gas or oil, I still not decided on whether to change to gas or stay with oil. Its such a hard choice have been reading so much on the manx forums.

 

some like oil

some like gas

 

our house is detached in two parts, back part has had silver beads last year put in thought it wise to do this and extra loft insulation.

 

the older part of the house is 1930's so solid walls and cannot insulate these like above

 

the thing is with gas there is one one provider, the new pipeline i thought would make it alot cheaper but who knows, what are other views on the price of gas in years to come? i did not know much about gas until i started to read, but am i right in thinking that it is linked with the MEA and therefore the government so government owned to a certain extent? the MEA did they not run up some big debts, surely they will try and get this back off the customers and therefore linked to gas, that is what makes me think will gas come down? will it be better than oil prices?

 

oil, yes shipping costs, over gas now having a pipeline. Oil I can see going up and up, but again will it be anymore expensive than gas, is there anyone out there will clear views, its all so complicated to understand I know others in the same position as me, having to change their boiler but dont know which will be cheapest long term, gas or oil.

 

Yes thank you to someone above who said go electric. I have looked into comfy heat, but you have to have this as your primary heating, so have to change all rads for storage heaters. If you have a small place this is good, you then can time your washing machine, etc to come on in the off peak rates, so saving electric, but a lot of outlay to change all your radiators if you have gas or oil now.

 

so anyone with any clear ideas to help me, have the builder coming down this afternoon and we have to decide soon on gas or oil as we are extending into loft space for extra bedrooms, and the cost of that is enough and then found out that our boiler wont cope, hence decision on gas or oil?

 

did consider solar, but from what i hear, it costs quite a bit still, and you wont save enought to make it worthwhile at the moment. One company I had down said do only water, do not do ELECTRIC, or HEATING as you have to have loads of solar tubes, so costing to do and with winter sun you would not get enough to heat the house or get enough electric.

 

shame would like solar to be the answer but dont think it can be at the moment.

 

so gas or oil?

 

any help would be good as know others are confused like me which is best, which is cheapest for the future.

 

Thanks

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Hello just thought i would update, as i have sent this to Burt, so to let you all know what a plumber has suggested for my house and extension

 

Dear Burt thank you for your reply.

 

We have decided to do a house extension to give the youngest child a bigger bedroom, give more room in the house.

 

There are two parts to our house, funny layout.

 

The newest is an extension put onto the house in 1985, last year we decided to spend the money and get a company to put silver beads into the walls and top up the loft space in this part of the house.

 

The other part of the house, the main house, is 1930's so solid walls so cannot put the silver beads into to. this 1930's part is where the extension is to take place.

 

Into the loft space of the 1930's part of the house and therefore we have been told that the firebird boiler that we have will not cope with the extra radiators.

 

The oil boiler is about 13 years old, regularly serviced and no trouble.

 

so seeing we have to replace the boiler this is where the gas or oil come in, which will be cheapest to run.

 

I have never looked into it before, but with high costs now i thought i ought to.

Gas from what I can gather with the new pipeline and natural gas should be better, manx gas promise lower costs, but i dont know. I keep thinking, gas only one supplier, from the MEA, therefore government and did not the MEA get itself into money troubles a while back, surely then they wont reduce the gas too much?

 

Oil well petrol dear everything to do with oil dear, shipping costs etc.

 

so dont know what to do and know others are in the same position as me, a friend is trying to decide to gas or oil.

 

just dont know which way to go.

 

Have had two plumbers and manx gas around, all saying different.

 

solar sounds good but i have been told that dont bother with thinking it can do elec and heating, as you would have to have loads and loads of tubes, so only think hot water, but if only hot water dont know if its worth doing with the cost of installing as my husband is not into DIY.

 

this is what one plumber has quoted

 

"replace existing oil boiler with a new condensing oil heating boiler. Remove cooper hot water cyclinder and storage tanks located in the loft and replace with an 250 litre megaflow pressurised hot water cylinder to be located in yoru garage next to the boiler."

 

several have said Megaflow is good.

 

so i really dont know what to do.

 

thanks for your help.

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Yes thank you to someone above who said go electric. I have looked into comfy heat, but you have to have this as your primary heating, so have to change all rads for storage heaters.

Comfy heat does not require storage heaters - simply a 6kW (or more) load - not well defined by the MEA but they will accept this which is what brings heat pumps into play.

Megaflow is fine but still not the best option.

If only there was just one choice it would be so much easier.

Good for you for researching and whatever you are advised by me or anyone else go with what you fell is the best solution AFTER taking objective advice.

Marc

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Thank you Marc and Tricia for above.

 

"simply a 6kW (or more) load" re comfy heating

 

I am sorry i still do not understand.

 

so currently we have a firebird oil boiler in the garage, oil tank in the garden, and radiators, 12 of them throughout the house.

 

for our new extension we have been told that the boiler is too small wont cope.

 

hence finding out about heating and what to go for

 

for comfy heat you said that you need simply a 6kW (or more) load - so can i leave my radiators now that i have throughout the house for comfy heat, sorry just dont understand what you need for comfy heat

 

the builder is coming round tomorrow evening so have to make a decision by then

 

I did send you a message March and Tricia on your website when you kindly replied to me.

 

Thank you for any help from anyone that is viewing this and previous messages, to see what systems you have, what you are pleased with, what works best

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Into the loft space of the 1930's part of the house and therefore we have been told that the firebird boiler that we have will not cope with the extra radiators.

 

You could possibly disconnect radiators you wouldn't need/use?, kitchen?, hallway?... etc

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I wouldn't recommend anyone attempt a DIY install of a boiler - not only dangerous but inefficient and will annul any home insurance policies should the worst happen.

 

You seem to know what you're talking about, but the only reason I said about DIY is from my understanding unlike gas where you have to be registered, anyone can install oil?

 

I'd just hate to be faced with a decision of oil or gas at the moment, costs so much to install and once done you're more or less committed for 10 years , hence my quick fix/temp solution of a more powerful s/h boiler.

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Nitro - I think you are obliged to inform building control if you are not OFTEC registered. BC will no doubt want to see a certificate of compliance of some sort at the end of the work. Anyone doing the work has to be competent.

 

Although I think there has never been a recorded death from CO poisoning from oil, there's an awful lot the unwary amateur could get wrong and as Marc has already pointed out, DIY is most ill-advised. Having said that, a professional who has done the courses, bought the equipment (and had it calibrated yearly) and paid all their fees and has all the business overheads will never believe anyone without those criteria should be doing anything. Why should they, you're doing them out of a living! In fact there are many non-trade highly skilled people quite capable of doing an installation that meets all the requirements and all they lack is current registration. I think that's not quite the same thing as being a hapless DIYer. Whatever, all work should be 'signed off' by a registered professional.

Edited by ballaughbiker
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Hello i just sent a message to the biker tryign to find out if i could leave my multi stove, much wenlock which is quite old now but still working connected to the pipework, the plumber has suggested disconnecting it, fitting a 250 megaflow and combi boiler.

 

the biker said that he had a Worcester Bosh.

Worcester Bosh they are the best most efficient oil boilers?

I think I shall stick to oil, familiar with it. But the plumber said he would disconnect my much wenlock stove (multi stove) in the lounge, disconnect the back boiler. At present it is connected so that it can heat up the water and also connected to the radiators, but it is not powerful enough to do the radiators and never has been, although the previous owners to the house said it would do them it cannot. so only useful when running for the hot water.

so would you say that a megaflow, combi oil boiler, but can you it so that you can do solar later, cannot afford this for now, do it also with the multi boiler in lounge? what do you call the appliance that lets you heat water from solar, oil and stove? we do not run the stove all the time, but it is a back up say if you had a power cut at least there would be hot water and also heat water if you did have on in winter.

but if disconnected then the stove would give more heat into the room would it not?

thanks

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Heating systems which use a combi boiler are pressurised so the water in radiators and pipes is under pressure. Traditional systems which use a fire back boiler, a stove or have a water tank are not. Your stove will not be able to handle the water pressure which is why it needs to be disconnected.

 

Sometimes stoves are connected to a couple of radiators of their own in rooms above which are not part of the combi boiler system. Personally I wouldn't bother doing this because, as you say, if you are not heating water from the stove you get more heat into the room instead.

 

You can get water tanks which have a number of coils which means different heat sources (solar panels, stoves etc) can heat the water in them but it's expensive and complicated.

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