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What The... Manx Radio Tt365


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Nice one slinky !

 

500 hits per day is not enormous. But an average listen of an hour is impressive. I imagine they are figures that some radio stations on the Isle of Man would dream of.

 

'500 hits per day' refers to unique hits, not common or garden hits, in which case I would agree is not necessarily enormous, but, as I stated, 500 unique hits per day. average over 300 or so days. That is pretty damn good

 

Since launch, 430,000 visits have been made to Manx Radio TT 365 by 165,000 unique visitors from 153 countries.

 

The 430,000 type of hits is what you are thinking about. Still pretty good though. I say again, 165,000 unique vistors (that is to say unique) is enormous. And that is for a service that I would consider was half-baked.

 

(Above said in the context of marketing a specialised product such as the TT commentary archive.)

 

 

......Ah fuck it. What is the point.

Edited by carbon selector
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... We all knew the appetite for the audio is enormous...

 

Erm, no. 500 people a day is not "enormous" by any standards and certainly not enough to make a website readio station and staff financially viable.

 

Thus it has closed down.

 

QED

QED my arse.

Those 500 people a day are unique hits.

 

source

Since launch, 430,000 visits have been made to Manx Radio TT 365 by 165,000 unique visitors from 153 countries.

Visitors from the UK, Isle of Man, Ireland, USA and Australia make up the top five, however, visitors came to the site from as far afield as Brazil, India, Japan, China, United Arab Emirates, South Africa and every European country. Those TT fans spent, on average, 59 minutes and 52 seconds re-living the racing and immersing themselves in the culture and history of the Isle of Man each time they visited the site.

 

An hour a hit! That is amazing. Youtube figures for example: the vast majority of visits are click-throughs, and are less than a few seconds and that brings the average stay right down. (Youtube not necessarily comparable but a good illustration).

 

Regarding the unique hits, to capture that many over such a period is spectacular. It is keeping them and increasing them that is the easy bit. Sorry, in this case, clearly the difficult, very, very difficult bit. *Sarcasm and all that*

 

500 unique hits a day is enormous. I'll restate..it's fucking enormous. It shows the power of the product, but if you don't have a clue or understanding how to capitalise on it, then what is the point.

 

You work for Manx Radio jonny?

 

Nope. never have.

 

But imagine for a moment I was an advertiser on the Isle of Man. (Not that either, but imagine.)

 

My access to customers comes through the newspaper (30,000 pw) or three radio stations, all with their own idea about the size of their audience but ANY of them will get me a whole lot more listeners than 500 a day.

 

Ask me, where will I spend my money?

 

Answer, not on some poxy website where a maximum of 500 people a day turn up.

 

Now imagine I'm a national advertiser. Anyone you like. Nescafe, Coca Cola. Macdonalds. Whatever. I have access to the UK press and commercial radio with a massively bigger audience than the entire population of the Isle of Man. Where do you suggest I spend my precious advertising and marketing budget? On 500 people max, most of whom might be in Sweden or Australia for all I know?

 

It's not rocket science.

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But imagine for a moment I was an advertiser on the Isle of Man. (Not that either, but imagine.)

 

My access to customers comes through the newspaper (30,000 pw) or three radio stations, all with their own idea about the size of their audience but ANY of them will get me a whole lot more listeners than 500 a day.

 

Ask me, where will I spend my money?

 

Answer, not on some poxy website where a maximum of 500 people a day turn up.

 

Now imagine I'm a national advertiser. Anyone you like. Nescafe, Coca Cola. Macdonalds. Whatever. I have access to the UK press and commercial radio with a massively bigger audience than the entire population of the Isle of Man. Where do you suggest I spend my precious advertising and marketing budget? On 500 people max, most of whom might be in Sweden or Australia for all I know?

 

It's not rocket science.

 

Now imagine you're involved in motorsports, most particularly road racing... or tourism, with a particular interest in TT/MGP/S100... and it's TT week with a lot more than 500 people. And there's no advertising in German or French elsewhere on the Island...

Edited by Dr Gonzo
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jonny,

 

Imagine you read my other posts.

 

That is, imagine your website had 500 hits a day that are unique hits. That is each and every day you have been running your website. Over 300 days,

 

Wow! You really must have something to attract that many unique hits every day. You really must. The figure of 500 unique hits is a clear indicator of that and is a starting point to build on. And the non unique hits backs that up. (The spread of those figures would be very interesting too, so is the 1 hour stay per hit, but let's keep it simple.)

 

Imagine you're maybe a bit dim and don't quite have a clue how to capitalise on the obvious asset - and that is backed up by the figures - you have at your disposal.

______________________________________

 

Just to put website hits into context, I know a website that advertises loft insulation. Nice website, nice product, well advertised. It can get over 2000 hits a day, in a cold spell 10 times that. The site makes a little money from advertising and occasionally sells some loft insulation. Maybe one or two buying customers a day. It makes a living wage. The website figures are relevant to a particular widget ie. loft insulation. Another website sells luxury yachts and might receive 100 hits a day. It sells just one widget - a luxury yacht - every few months, even one a year. Yep, sometimes as little as one paying customer a year. Makes a good living though.

 

Back on topic. Not loft insulation, not luxury yachts, but 50 years or so, of Isle of Man TT radio archive and an audience clamouring for the product. (And if they are not clamouring for it, you make them clamour for it).

 

Manx Radio TT365 - a product that left a lot of room to be better managed.

Edited by carbon selector
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The problem with the 365 thing was that Manx Radio already get advertising for TT week when the traffic is through the roof, for a specialist advertiser they can maximise their audience in a two week campaign and MR should charge them appropriately for that.

 

Take out the huge traffic spikes around the race weeks and the average of 500 uniques a day sound like it was more in the region of 50-100 uniques a day and that is the sort of audience you would expect for a local isle of man business website not a global brand.

 

Staying for an hour on a normal website is exceptional, though firing up a web based radio station and carrying on with what you were doing in another browser tab I would suggest is not a standard web site, I do it all the time even turning the volume down when taking a call and then forgetting I have a tab open, so there is no advantage to banner adverts on a page that is not visible and as covered in this thread is was seen as too much work to replace the audio adverts within the original recordings.

 

It was a weak concept, poorly delivered and was never going to be successful, thankfully someone in our government decided that their is no longer an open chequebook to stupid ideas.

Edited by orbit
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http://www.manxradio...d.aspx?id=59093

 

I won't criticise it (i.e. should Manx Radio be spending money on this) as I quite literaly don't get it... blink.png

 

So let me get this straight. The Government thought this was a bad idea and would not back it. So Manx Radio, who are financially supported by Government money [Our money] went ahead and did it anyway. Do I have that right , and who will pick up the tab.? Let me guess = US

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I don't know why they call it the 'wireless'. My radio's full of wires and won't even work if I don't plug it in with the plug on the end of the wire connected to it. I think maybe someone writing the dictionary that year must have fell asleep or confused 'wireless' with a block of cheese on their desk or something like that.

I think it's cos the person talking to you on it is not directly connected to it using wires but using radio waves instead unlike the old tellingbone which uses wires. But not the new mobilly tellingbones. They use wireless too.

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But imagine for a moment I was an advertiser on the Isle of Man. (Not that either, but imagine.)

 

My access to customers comes through the newspaper (30,000 pw) or three radio stations, all with their own idea about the size of their audience but ANY of them will get me a whole lot more listeners than 500 a day.

 

Ask me, where will I spend my money?

 

Answer, not on some poxy website where a maximum of 500 people a day turn up.

 

Now imagine I'm a national advertiser. Anyone you like. Nescafe, Coca Cola. Macdonalds. Whatever. I have access to the UK press and commercial radio with a massively bigger audience than the entire population of the Isle of Man. Where do you suggest I spend my precious advertising and marketing budget? On 500 people max, most of whom might be in Sweden or Australia for all I know?

 

It's not rocket science.

 

Now imagine you're involved in motorsports, most particularly road racing... or tourism, with a particular interest in TT/MGP/S100... and it's TT week with a lot more than 500 people. And there's no advertising in German or French elsewhere on the Island...

 

Apart from Manx Radio TT. Duh.

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jonny,

 

Imagine you read my other posts.

 

That is, imagine your website had 500 hits a day that are unique hits. That is each and every day you have been running your website. Over 300 days,

 

Wow! You really must have something to attract that many unique hits every day. You really must. The figure of 500 unique hits is a clear indicator of that and is a starting point to build on. And the non unique hits backs that up. (The spread of those figures would be very interesting too, so is the 1 hour stay per hit, but let's keep it simple.)

 

Imagine you're maybe a bit dim and don't quite have a clue how to capitalise on the obvious asset - and that is backed up by the figures - you have at your disposal.

______________________________________

 

Just to put website hits into context, I know a website that advertises loft insulation. Nice website, nice product, well advertised. It can get over 2000 hits a day, in a cold spell 10 times that. The site makes a little money from advertising and occasionally sells some loft insulation. Maybe one or two buying customers a day. It makes a living wage. The website figures are relevant to a particular widget ie. loft insulation. Another website sells luxury yachts and might receive 100 hits a day. It sells just one widget - a luxury yacht - every few months, even one a year. Yep, sometimes as little as one paying customer a year. Makes a good living though.

 

Back on topic. Not loft insulation, not luxury yachts, but 50 years or so, of Isle of Man TT radio archive and an audience clamouring for the product. (And if they are not clamouring for it, you make them clamour for it).

 

Manx Radio TT365 - a product that left a lot of room to be better managed.

 

Oh dear. Let's imagine you read MY post.

 

TT365 didn't sell yachts. So small numbers don't work for it. Only numbers that match those of rival outlets could make it viable.

 

When the local paper gets 30,000 UNIQUE hits every issue and TT365 is getting 450, it's really not enough, is it.

 

Be generous. let's do it weekly and allow it 500 hits, and it's outclassed by the local press on a ratio of almost ten to one.

 

If YOU were selling YOUR house, where would YOU advertise?

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"there is so much I would like to say about MRTT365, DED, IOM Newspapers, MEA, DCCL, other radio stations, IOM Gov, Tesco etc.... but I better not!"

 

"Anyone who continues to swallow Isle of Man Newspapers' crap about Manx Radio being a 'state-subsidised broadcaster' might like to consider how much money the papers receive per annum to publish public notices which hardly anyone reads. It runs into the hundreds of thousands. Providing an important public service, or propping up a failing paper which wouldn't be able to exist without it?"

 

"We're not supposed to post about this kind of thing, but I'm sick to death of reading that shit. Butt and his cronies know it's not true, but continue to perpetuate this myth that we're subsidised for their own ends. Reading it again today was the final straw."

 

Couple of comments from MR staff about the newspaper story...seems they're not too happy!

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If YOU were selling YOUR house, where would YOU advertise?

Isle of Man Newspapers. Obviously. There is little relevant common ground between Isle of Man Newspapers' wide audience and a site offering archive footage of the Isle of Man TT races.

 

TT365 failed. Everyone agrees that.

 

Where my argument and your argument differs is that you would appear to think it was doomed to failure in any case. My argument is that it failed but should not have failed. Properly managed it should have succeeded. You won't accept that.

 

Even with it being mismanaged, poorly delivered, not properly marketed, whatever - it was still getting significant hits. Showing there is a market out there that wants access to that archive.

__________________________

 

An example to try and illustrate: someone tells me they have found in his father's loft four old reels of Dads Army film. His father was a technician with the BBC and worked on the films and kept the reels for a souvenir and memento. They were, after all being thrown out. The episodes/films are offically listed as "missing" by the BBC.

 

Leaving severe BBC copyright rules to one side for this example, and let us say my colleague owns the films outright, I can have the film expertly and cleanly transferred to a PC in a weekend. And the missing episodes can then be put up on youtube. Result - the world now has access to these missing treasures. Job done, everybody is happy.

 

OK, the films can be transferred to DvD to make a few bob.

 

But is even that how to maximise the audience and income?

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