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Roadworks Crosby To Ballacraine


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They're buggered whatever they do...

Leave the road alone - people moan

Surface dressing - people moan

Rip up an re-tarmac - people moan

 

True kevster

 

Could you imagine closing peel road from the brown bobby to the qb for 10 weeks

Wait until they start work on Douglas Prom. Everyone moans about the state of the road surface, and yes, it is like driving over a ploughed field in places.

You want it fixed? OK, just don't winge about the chaos and disruption it will cause during the work.

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I had to go to Peel today and noticed the long stretches being coated with chippings.The road did not seem to be in a bad state of repair prior to this and it must have been up to scratch to run the

Preventative maintenance, it's a good thing, no harm in people having a whine though eh.   They are also doing ballig into peel, which is not on the course, sorry if that messes up the conspiracy th

Things may seem a backward step, like the steam rollers replaced by smaller ones but have you thought that new types of rollers also have a vibration setting which actually produces more compaction th

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There's a lovely new tarmac surface on the road from South Barrule car park to the Round Table. It must have cost a fortune and is surely greatly appreciated by the thousands who commute daily from Port Erin to Foxdale.

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A useful thread - if forum readers keep this updated. It could be called 'Chip Watch'. I won't be travelling on any roads which have recently been 'treated' as I have had too much damaged paintwork and several broken windscreens over the years from loose chippings flying up from under the wheels of oncoming traffic and hitting my car. I wouldn't mind if the chippings were fine enough and rolled in properly but the quantity used is often far too much for the job and then left for ordinary traffic to disperse. 21st century road mending on the Isle of Man.....?

 

The chipping are put Down in 2 stages, 10mm chipping first, followed by 6mm chipping, then rolled. It's what you call surface dressing, which in fact is to dress a road surface to prevent more damage, which I would say is more cost effective than ripping up and tarmacing that stretch of road.

That's exactly what I was saying - the chippings are too big. And they are not properly rolled - otherwise there wouldn't be such a massive excess lying on the surface for ages afterwards - that's what does the damage to paintwork and glass.

 

But there not too big, that's the size that is used not only here but the uk also. It's part of the process of surface dressing, but I know what your saying. If people keep to the speed limits showing and keep a fair distance then it can prevent damages to cars traveling on that stretch. As for not rolled properly I can say they are rolled properly.

And I can say they are NOT rolled properly,simple reason,they don't have the proper road rollers,the one they are using is separate rubber wheels,years ago they had steam rollers,also smaller diesel rollers,I worked on the old Highway Board in the sixties,we had to spread the chippings by hand,the only thing which was moving was the tar waggon,then the steam rollers came along and really crushed the chippings into the road,we then had to sweep up any loose chippings and shovel them back onto the waggon because the car windscreens in those days were not laminated and would shatter completely.

The main thing is the government should be held responsible for any chipping damage done to peoples vehicles,as people have to pay road tax to have the roads in a perfect condition to drive on safely,there are regulations to control how most work is done IE Electrical,Plumbing,Building,and it's government who make them,so why isn't there regulations on how government should do their work which affects peoples property?.

Going back to the way the roads are rolled,I remember a few years ago the Peel Road section from the Brown Bobbie down to Athol Street junction was chipped,and rolled in with this type of rubber roller,and when the DOT left,a road sweeper of Douglas Corporation came along and swept up most of the chippings including the ones which were rolled in,the road was a bit sticky as well.

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A useful thread - if forum readers keep this updated. It could be called 'Chip Watch'. I won't be travelling on any roads which have recently been 'treated' as I have had too much damaged paintwork and several broken windscreens over the years from loose chippings flying up from under the wheels of oncoming traffic and hitting my car. I wouldn't mind if the chippings were fine enough and rolled in properly but the quantity used is often far too much for the job and then left for ordinary traffic to disperse. 21st century road mending on the Isle of Man.....?

 

The chipping are put Down in 2 stages, 10mm chipping first, followed by 6mm chipping, then rolled. It's what you call surface dressing, which in fact is to dress a road surface to prevent more damage, which I would say is more cost effective than ripping up and tarmacing that stretch of road.

That's exactly what I was saying - the chippings are too big. And they are not properly rolled - otherwise there wouldn't be such a massive excess lying on the surface for ages afterwards - that's what does the damage to paintwork and glass.

 

But there not too big, that's the size that is used not only here but the uk also. It's part of the process of surface dressing, but I know what your saying. If people keep to the speed limits showing and keep a fair distance then it can prevent damages to cars traveling on that stretch. As for not rolled properly I can say they are rolled properly.

And I can say they are NOT rolled properly,simple reason,they don't have the proper road rollers,the one they are using is separate rubber wheels,years ago they had steam rollers,also smaller diesel rollers,I worked on the old Highway Board in the sixties,we had to spread the chippings by hand,the only thing which was moving was the tar waggon,then the steam rollers came along and really crushed the chippings into the road,we then had to sweep up any loose chippings and shovel them back onto the waggon because the car windscreens in those days were not laminated and would shatter completely.

The main thing is the government should be held responsible for any chipping damage done to peoples vehicles,as people have to pay road tax to have the roads in a perfect condition to drive on safely,there are regulations to control how most work is done IE Electrical,Plumbing,Building,and it's government who make them,so why isn't there regulations on how government should do their work which affects peoples property?.

Going back to the way the roads are rolled,I remember a few years ago the Peel Road section from the Brown Bobbie down to Athol Street junction was chipped,and rolled in with this type of rubber roller,and when the DOT left,a road sweeper of Douglas Corporation came along and swept up most of the chippings including the ones which were rolled in,the road was a bit sticky as well.

 

Be some job doing that stretch of road today by hand, and using a steamroller! The roller used down there has 4 solid wheels at the back and 3 solid wheels at the front which is more than capable to do its job, so you are saying it isn't ok! There maybe excess chippings but I'm sure they won't be there when the process is finished as the job isn't completed YET!

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The roller used currently is nowhere near as heavy as the old ones, which had steel rollers, not rubber. It's like so many 'improvements' that aren't!

 

Things may seem a backward step, like the steam rollers replaced by smaller ones but have you thought that new types of rollers also have a vibration setting which actually produces more compaction than the old ones?

 

I would actually question why you would want to crush the chippings anyway,(and probably why the new ones have rubber rollers) are the chippings not more effective with freshly quarried sharp edges when acting as the grip layer on a road?

 

I may be wrong but that would be my understanding of the process, which as mentioned, is far far less disruptive and a lot cheaper than digging/planning up the old and putting down new tarmac.

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I went through these roadworks early this morning travelling westbound. A car passed me heading east exceeding the 20mph limit. My car windscreen was hit and stones also hit the paintwork of my car. Surely in order to get road users to adhere to the limit some sort of portable speed bumps could be used.

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A useful thread - if forum readers keep this updated. It could be called 'Chip Watch'. I won't be travelling on any roads which have recently been 'treated' as I have had too much damaged paintwork and several broken windscreens over the years from loose chippings flying up from under the wheels of oncoming traffic and hitting my car. I wouldn't mind if the chippings were fine enough and rolled in properly but the quantity used is often far too much for the job and then left for ordinary traffic to disperse. 21st century road mending on the Isle of Man.....?

 

The chipping are put Down in 2 stages, 10mm chipping first, followed by 6mm chipping, then rolled. It's what you call surface dressing, which in fact is to dress a road surface to prevent more damage, which I would say is more cost effective than ripping up and tarmacing that stretch of road.

That's exactly what I was saying - the chippings are too big. And they are not properly rolled - otherwise there wouldn't be such a massive excess lying on the surface for ages afterwards - that's what does the damage to paintwork and glass.

 

But there not too big, that's the size that is used not only here but the uk also. It's part of the process of surface dressing, but I know what your saying. If people keep to the speed limits showing and keep a fair distance then it can prevent damages to cars traveling on that stretch. As for not rolled properly I can say they are rolled properly.

And I can say they are NOT rolled properly,simple reason,they don't have the proper road rollers,the one they are using is separate rubber wheels,years ago they had steam rollers,also smaller diesel rollers,I worked on the old Highway Board in the sixties,we had to spread the chippings by hand,the only thing which was moving was the tar waggon,then the steam rollers came along and really crushed the chippings into the road,we then had to sweep up any loose chippings and shovel them back onto the waggon because the car windscreens in those days were not laminated and would shatter completely.

The main thing is the government should be held responsible for any chipping damage done to peoples vehicles,as people have to pay road tax to have the roads in a perfect condition to drive on safely,there are regulations to control how most work is done IE Electrical,Plumbing,Building,and it's government who make them,so why isn't there regulations on how government should do their work which affects peoples property?.

Going back to the way the roads are rolled,I remember a few years ago the Peel Road section from the Brown Bobbie down to Athol Street junction was chipped,and rolled in with this type of rubber roller,and when the DOT left,a road sweeper of Douglas Corporation came along and swept up most of the chippings including the ones which were rolled in,the road was a bit sticky as well.

 

Be some job doing that stretch of road today by hand, and using a steamroller! The roller used down there has 4 solid wheels at the back and 3 solid wheels at the front which is more than capable to do its job, so you are saying it isn't ok! There maybe excess chippings but I'm sure they won't be there when the process is finished as the job isn't completed YET!

When the job is finished will be when the men and waggons are gone,but the chippings will still be there loose on the road and pushed into the sides by vehicles,they don't sweep up after them,have a look at the Lord Street car park,the chippings there are still loose after 4 months,and the answer to your first query is,yes it was some job and there were lots of men doing it.

As for using a steam roller they were very good at pushing the chippings like a good layer into the tar base,very little was left on the road loose,as the men used yard brushes to sweep any loose into the gutters,then the waggon would come along and all the piles of chippings were shoveled by hand onto the waggon to be used again,the windscreens were triplex not laminated like today,and it was very dangerous if one shattered in on you,that's why the job was done properly,why they got rid of the steam rollers I don't know,but they do have diesel ones with steel rollers.

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Loose chippings are a pain as one contributor pointed out, cracked screens, chipped paint etc. As one of many bikers on the island however they can be dangerous, even deadly. They are not easy to spot on certain surfaces and can cause problems even at low speed. In this era of H&S gone mad does the DOI/DOT not have a duty of care to ensure our roads are maintained to a reasonable standard and the surfaces such that that they are kept free from any matter likely to cause accident or injury?

As far as potholes and chippings go it seems the answer is NO

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Just driven through Crosby and Greeba and it's like driving through a quarry - which is ok if you're in a tractor but not very nice if you're driving anything other than a POS banger. People travelling far too fast, stones flying all over the place, clouds of dust in the air (glad I don't live along that road) and the underside of my car being shot blasted (at 20mph or less). It's a bloody mess. They either need to control the speed of vehicles or stop this surface dressing. I would rather deal with pot holes than driving through this.

 

Normally at this time of year I would be using the bike for work but the dangerous condition of the road means it stays at home.

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I went through on a bike and it was fine. I knew the chipping work was going on and could have taken an alternative route. I followed the speed limit signs and was promptly left behind by the line of cars in front of me. I then increased my speed to 30, but the cars still pulled away. I then reduced speed again and followed the limits.

 

The problem isn't the chippings, the roller or anything else related to the work. Its the car drivers IMHO.

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Just driven through Crosby and Greeba and it's like driving through a quarry - which is ok if you're in a tractor but not very nice if you're driving anything other than a POS banger. People travelling far too fast, stones flying all over the place, clouds of dust in the air (glad I don't live along that road) and the underside of my car being shot blasted (at 20mph or less). It's a bloody mess. They either need to control the speed of vehicles or stop this surface dressing. I would rather deal with pot holes than driving through this.

 

Normally at this time of year I would be using the bike for work but the dangerous condition of the road means it stays at home.

 

Really?

 

I was about 20 minutes behind you. There were clippings on the gutters, but the road was fine. There was a bit of dust in thais, what do you expect? The only time I saw clippings fly up was a police car heading in the opposite direction at way above the 20 limit. Everyone else seemed to be sticking to about 30, which to be honest was fine with the amount of clippings that were left on the surface.

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Just driven through Crosby and Greeba and it's like driving through a quarry - which is ok if you're in a tractor but not very nice if you're driving anything other than a POS banger. People travelling far too fast, stones flying all over the place, clouds of dust in the air (glad I don't live along that road) and the underside of my car being shot blasted (at 20mph or less). It's a bloody mess. They either need to control the speed of vehicles or stop this surface dressing. I would rather deal with pot holes than driving through this.

 

Normally at this time of year I would be using the bike for work but the dangerous condition of the road means it stays at home.

 

Really?

 

I was about 20 minutes behind you. There were clippings on the gutters, but the road was fine. There was a bit of dust in thais, what do you expect? The only time I saw clippings fly up was a police car heading in the opposite direction at way above the 20 limit. Everyone else seemed to be sticking to about 30, which to be honest was fine with the amount of clippings that were left on the surface.

 

Why do you keep saying clippings? The road isn't covered in bits of finger and toe nails biggrin.png

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