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Peel Road Repairs To Take 80 Weeks


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Much of that road is on a concrete raft base, in sections I seem to recall. The sections have diferentially settled and cracked. Hence the switchback effect. There is tarmac on top. So the tarmac has to be removed, then the concrete raft sections have to be broken up (and they will be reinforced so the metal will have to be cut, and removed, and you can only do one carriageway at a time unless you close it all together, then you have to dig out the footings and stabilise before grading and relaying and then doing the top coats. That is why many of the services are going to be relaid and why it is going to take so long. We are goingfto use our own resources, not close it all for 3 months and cause total road block and have to bring in lots of off Island workers and plant, so the spend and tax take will stay local. Much of the private will be Colas and the like, I expect, It keeps Manx workers in work instead of on the dole, keeps the traffic moving and improves infrastructure.

 

Lets face it, when the prom was last widened and Peel Road last done there was also a world recession. It is exactly the right time for this sort of capital scheme.

 

Just remind me how many miles of HS2 is being built, new builkd, no existing traffic and how long is that going to take? Oh and that will be all private

 

Thing is think of the moaning on here if they imported 100 non Manx, did it in 3 months worked around thy clock disturbing local residents ands completely closing Pel Road including access to McD's, the MIlestone, Eurocars, Hills Meadow etc

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Apologies to Bernard Cribbins...again   ‘Right’ said Dave, ‘it's Peel Road, ‘Needs some work, so steady as we go’, Let’s get paving, the pavements all need saving, We was getting nowhere And s

The Isle of Man, where every day feels like April 1st.

What is 'up', is that many of us are pig sick of paying top dollar and pensions for what seems to be yet another poorly designed and elongated project solution, at a time when we are facing major cuts

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Much of that road is on a concrete raft base, in sections I seem to recall. The sections have diferentially settled and cracked. Hence the switchback effect. There is tarmac on top. So the tarmac has to be removed, then the concrete raft sections have to be broken up (and they will be reinforced so the metal will have to be cut, and removed, and you can only do one carriageway at a time unless you close it all together, then you have to dig out the footings and stabilise before grading and relaying and then doing the top coats. That is why many of the services are going to be relaid and why it is going to take so long. We are goingfto use our own resources, not close it all for 3 months and cause total road block and have to bring in lots of off Island workers and plant, so the spend and tax take will stay local. Much of the private will be Colas and the like, I expect, It keeps Manx workers in work instead of on the dole, keeps the traffic moving and improves infrastructure.

 

Lets face it, when the prom was last widened and Peel Road last done there was also a world recession. It is exactly the right time for this sort of capital scheme.

 

Just remind me how many miles of HS2 is being built, new builkd, no existing traffic and how long is that going to take? Oh and that will be all private

 

Thing is think of the moaning on here if they imported 100 non Manx, did it in 3 months worked around thy clock disturbing local residents ands completely closing Pel Road including access to McD's, the MIlestone, Eurocars, Hills Meadow etc

 

Well said John.

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Yes, well explained John. It's not just legal ground-work you're familiar with.

I can see you in the hard-hat and high-viz.

If the firm ever goes tits-up you could apply to JCK.

Slightly different hourly rate though....

 

Respect....

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've seen a few people say why don't they go for the quick and easy resurfacing option.

 

I was of the same opinion until I walked down the recently resurfaced Victoria Road today. It was starting to crack already and even had what seemed to be a collapsed drain near Shoprite. Who'd have thought drilling holes and squirting in that expanding builders foam wouldn't have worked.

 

Stop doing these half arsed stopgaps like this and jetpatching if potholes and do it properly like I hope Peel Road will be. It may just turn out to be cheaper in the long run.

Edited by Ron Burgandy
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I've seen a few people say why don't they go for the quick and easy resurfacing option.

 

I was of the same opinion until I walked down the recently resurfaced Victoria Road today. It was starting to crack already and even had what seemed to be a collapsed drain near Shoprite. Who'd have thought drilling holes and squirting in that expanding builders foam wouldn't have worked.

 

Stop doing these half arsed stopgaps like this and jetpatching if potholes and do it properly like I hope Peel Road will be. It may just turn out to be cheaper in the long run.

 

Is it cracking along the edges of the concrete slab road underneath, in straight lines of a sort or just cracking all over the place? The foam injection technique is a well proven method of concrete slab stabilisation and should not have failed.

 

I would think the cracks are along the joints between the concrete, there is nothing you can do about that really when you overlay concrete slabs with tarmac.

 

It should have had the asphalt broken up melted and re-laid over the concrete and flexible material used over the concrete slab joints, like you see/ feel and hear on motorways.

 

Did I ever mention before that I think asphalt is ace? thumbsup.gif

 

Many moons ago I was doing up a block of flats on Peel Road near the Brown Bobby, I had to put a new drain into the sewer in the road. The guys I got to do the work had to have the hole patched with asphalt, tarmac was not allowed back then as the rest of the road was asphalt.

 

It cost more but the finished repair was good, still there to this day and dead flat, not like the usual patches you see on roads in tarmac. Its was laid with a trowel and flattened like you would with concrete and used the old asphalt heated up and re melted, so good for the environment.

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I've seen a few people say why don't they go for the quick and easy resurfacing option.

 

I was of the same opinion until I walked down the recently resurfaced Victoria Road today. It was starting to crack already and even had what seemed to be a collapsed drain near Shoprite. Who'd have thought drilling holes and squirting in that expanding builders foam wouldn't have worked.

 

Stop doing these half arsed stopgaps like this and jetpatching if potholes and do it properly like I hope Peel Road will be. It may just turn out to be cheaper in the long run.

 

Is it cracking along the edges of the concrete slab road underneath, in straight lines of a sort or just cracking all over the place? The foam injection technique is a well proven method of concrete slab stabilisation and should not have failed.

 

I would think the cracks are along the joints between the concrete, there is nothing you can do about that really when you overlay concrete slabs with tarmac.

 

It should have had the asphalt broken up melted and re-laid over the concrete and flexible material used over the concrete slab joints, like you see/ feel and hear on motorways.

 

Did I ever mention before that I think asphalt is ace? thumbsup.gif

 

Many moons ago I was doing up a block of flats on Peel Road near the Brown Bobby, I had to put a new drain into the sewer in the road. The guys I got to do the work had to have the hole patched with asphalt, tarmac was not allowed back then as the rest of the road was asphalt.

 

It cost more but the finished repair was good, still there to this day and dead flat, not like the usual patches you see on roads in tarmac. Its was laid with a trowel and flattened like you would with concrete and used the old asphalt heated up and re melted, so good for the environment.

As long as the surface never has to be cut into again, then at least it goes some way to improving things for the future. If new drains, pipes or whatever is required to be on the other side of the road, do it in the same place as I've yet to see a perfect seamless patch that hasn't gone wrong over a length of time.
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  • 3 weeks later...

How can you say it is not VFM when you don't have any more information than its cost? £4 million has been mentioned but how can you say if £4 million is too much?

 

£4million seems a snip compared to the £1.4 million to repave parts of Regent Street, Drumgold Street and Victoria Street as the latest part of the regeneration plan that is due to last until November. The total cost of that project is £5million!!!

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-isle-of-man-21653930

Edited by Lost Login
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post-13319-0-10178800-1362693964_thumb.jpgThese two photos show the same stretch of road—the Great Kanto branch—three days apart. By March 16th, just three days after the earthquake tore it apart, the road was rebuilt to the condition seen in the photo.

 

Here's the press release (run through Google Translate) from Nexco East, the company that runs that stretch of regional highway. I'm sure there's more of a point to be made about such a stunning display of resiliency, or as Michael Cote described it, the "diligent efficiency" of the response. About whether it would be possible if the government alone—and not a private company—would be able to work so quickly and efficiently. About whether anything like this would ever be possible in the United States. (Doubtful.) But for now, it's just an amazing thing to see.

Edited by vikingdoom
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post-13319-0-10178800-1362693964_thumb.jpgThese two photos show the same stretch of road—the Great Kanto branch—three days apart. By March 16th, just three days after the earthquake tore it apart, the road was rebuilt to the condition seen in the photo.

 

Here's the press release (run through Google Translate) from Nexco East, the company that runs that stretch of regional highway. I'm sure there's more of a point to be made about such a stunning display of resiliency, or as Michael Cote described it, the "diligent efficiency" of the response. About whether it would be possible if the government alone—and not a private company—would be able to work so quickly and efficiently. About whether anything like this would ever be possible in the United States. (Doubtful.) But for now, it's just an amazing thing to see.

 

In a country where earthquakes are the norm I would have thought the systems to rebuild would be in place. If we had earthquakes every few years and a major high speed road network with the infrastructure to support it we'd could do all that in three days too. We don't and haven't, so can't.

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