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Secondary School Teacher Shortage


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Translation: "We're throwing them all in together to save money, even though it will be very detrimental to the education of all the students."

...bearing in mind that teachers care about education, its going to be harder to attract teachers here if by doing so it means that they cannot get a tertiary education for their own children! May as

LCD screens, embossed art books, printed homework diaries etc etc etc, yes, I am a little miffed about it all, only because it is a senseless waste of funds that could be put to better use. Perhaps pa

A teacher shortage but...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-isle-of-man-21786886

 

 

Eleven teaching posts are to be axed in schools across the Isle of Man, as the education department plans changes to its special needs provision.

The specialist teachers affected run support groups in both the primary and secondary sector.

The staff affected look after children with less complex special needs in mainstream education.

An education spokesman said the groups would be replaced by a "whole school approach to nurturing pupils".

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An education spokesman said the groups would be replaced by a "whole school approach to nurturing pupils".

Translation: "We're throwing them all in together to save money, even though it will be very detrimental to the education of all the students."

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From Vinnie k: There is a PGCE for Primary teachers provided on Island, but I'm not sure how successful it is since the DES refuses to supply a bursary or maintenance grant to those studying it (compare with the UK, where bursaries from £5,000 to £20,000 are available to those training via the PGCE)

 

The sad fact is that the DEC have now scrapped the on island primary PGCE. My daughter was in the last cohort which finished last June and so far she has not been able to get a permanent position and is having to rely upon supply work which is very hit and miss.

She wrote to the Primary adviser at the DEC to ask why they had just spent a lot of money in training her only to be told that they had not planned on actually employing her cohort but if any vacancies came up she was welcome to apply!

I seem to remember towards the end of last year that the DEC announced that they would need to have five extra reception classes in September due to an increase in children starting school. Hopefully this will generate some new posts for these newly qualified teachers.

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An education spokesman said the groups would be replaced by a "whole school approach to nurturing pupils".

Translation: "We're throwing them all in together to save money, even though it will be very detrimental to the education of all the students."

If every pupil is at the same stage with the same goal, same behaviour, same requirements and achievement, then having larger classes shouldn't make too much difference although the more you have, the less the effect. Unfortunately and thankfully I may add, each student or pupil possesses different types of behaviours which add to uniqueness and having the same colour, size, type etc, might make things easier to stereotype, but I do love the little quirks of life.

 

I saw this graph which seemed to explain things a little better or should I say, why little is better

US_correlation_between_class_size_and_reading_performance.png

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Soon after the MEA "overspend" the Dept. of Ed. started knocking down walls in primary schools, to "make more space in classrooms." This was a smoke screen to render classrooms suitable for cutting costs by cramming several year groups in together with just one teacher. This was a retrograde step taking conditions back to when I was in short trousers.

 

I'll try to be optimistic and hope that this has not happened....................but,

  • Does anyone know of a school where more than one primary year group is being taught by a single teacher?
  • If yes, what is the approximate number of pupils with that teacher?

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A teacher shortage but...

http://www.bbc.co.uk...-man-21786886

 

 

Eleven teaching posts are to be axed in schools across the Isle of Man, as the education department plans changes to its special needs provision.

The specialist teachers affected run support groups in both the primary and secondary sector.

The staff affected look after children with less complex special needs in mainstream education.

An education spokesman said the groups would be replaced by a "whole school approach to nurturing pupils".

 

This should be challenged.On the radio Dobson said they were going to put 2 teaching assistants in a class instead of one qualified teacher and one assistant. In UK you are not allowed to leave a teaching assistant in charge of a class.

I don't know what the legal situation is here.

http://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=6166868

Edited by Moghrey Mie
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  • 3 weeks later...

Manx born teacher here, qualified 2 years ago and moved back to the island over 6 months ago trying to find a job as a science teacher. Not even a look in yet despite good grades/references/experience. Haven't seen a job posting in months. Working in retail and thinking why I bothered working so hard for my chemistry degree and PGCE.

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Surely you would be better off doing supply work than working in retail.

 

Pretty sure May is the cut off for resigning / moving / retiring so probably a few jobs for september will come up then.

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Manx born teacher here, qualified 2 years ago and moved back to the island over 6 months ago trying to find a job as a science teacher.

 

You would almost certainly be better off trying to relocate to the UK as soon as possible. At least then you might be able to make some kind of living from the greater opportunities for subbing and tutoring whilst waiting for next year's February-May recruitment push there, not to mention keeping your hand in and building experience.

 

Put it this way, staying on the Island means that you're basically making it more difficult to apply for the more frequent and greater number of opportunities in the UK in return for... what? Maybe a handful of positions that you may not even get and could still apply to whilst living elsewhere?

Edited by VinnieK
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I'm on the supply list but its very infrequent work, not enough to live on basically. I work in retail but it's the only job available to someone like me with only a years experience and no experience outside of teaching.

 

Unfortunately, I can't really relocate, family issues/money mean I am stuck here for the foreseeable future-plus I'm quite settled with a long term girlfriend who has a great job here. It's quite disheartening and i'm at the point where I think that it's not worth all the hassle.

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Unfortunately the Dept of Education has been shedding jobs for at least five years. As Orbit said. 31 May is the resignation date and vacancies will come up after that. Keep plugging away with the supply and good luck.

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