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Tough Decisions For Island's Chief Constable


carbon selector
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From Manx Radio

Tough decisions for Island's chief constable

 

Gary Roberts has warned 'something will have to give', because 90 per cent of his budget is spent on staff costs.

 

Hey Gary, I'll give you a decision that will be piss easy.

 

Get rid of coppers that lie and are shit at their job, the bad apples in an otherwise ok force. You know who they are. The good guys don't want them (erm, I don't think so anyway), I'm sure you don't want them and most importantly the decent Manx public don't want them (although I'm sure there are a few 'big wigs' that find the occasional bent copper quite handy).

 

You know who these guys are. Grow some and get rid of them. Save the taxpayer the salary, the whopping eventual pay-off and pension too. And to boot have a decent Isle of Man Constabulary that we can all be proud of.

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Save on vehicle and fuel costs by resorting to visible, proactive, regular foot-patrolling which has to be the best deterrent to street-crime. Rather than aimlessly driving around between trips to the chippy/Chinese/Indian takeaways. Which leads on to - Fitness...ditch the slobs like the Armed forces are now doing. Raise minimum fitness standards to more than the, er, minimum.

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The vast majority of crime on the IOM is alcohol related, so what's the solution?

 

Agreed - except that its both drug & alcohol related - and the numptys in Tynwald appear to think the solution is to stop funding something like DASH that actually works!

Edited by Lonan3
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Save on vehicle and fuel costs by resorting to visible, proactive, regular foot-patrolling which has to be the best deterrent to street-crime. Rather than aimlessly driving around between trips to the chippy/Chinese/Indian takeaways. Which leads on to - Fitness...ditch the slobs like the Armed forces are now doing. Raise minimum fitness standards to more than the, er, minimum.

 

You started with a very good point about foot patrolling but then spoiled it by resorting to cheap shots aimed at car drivers. The simple truth is this, foot patrol is great and works, the down side is it requires a huge number of staff to cover anything like a decent area. Secondly the public should expect a swift response to any help they require and to do that you need officers in cars too so more staffing costs. The aimless driving around you allude to is probably the car drivers doing what a beat officer in years gone by would have been doing only now they have to do it in cars. It is possible to achieve a really good police force which fulfils all the publics demands and expectations, unfortunately no one can afford it !

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Another simple way would be to cease the practice of retirement at fifty or earlier, taking a huge lump sum and fantastic pension, and then picking up a lucrative job working for government or in the private sector. There are an awful lot of very wealthy 'retired' police officers on this Island, drawing massive pensions at a relatively young age, stepping out through the revolving door and straight back in again, into highly paid jobs that more often than not are neither available nor advertised to the general public. If these people are so valuable, then they should be retained in the profession for which they have been trained, and in which they have accumulated so much experience. Teachers and nurses can't take early retirement on such generous packages, and their job is just as stressful as those of police officers. The 'retirement club' culture on the IOM is all part of the real cost of policing.

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Another simple way would be to cease the practice of retirement at fifty or earlier, taking a huge lump sum and fantastic pension, and then picking up a lucrative job working for government or in the private sector. There are an awful lot of very wealthy 'retired' police officers on this Island, drawing massive pensions at a relatively young age, stepping out through the revolving door and straight back in again, into highly paid jobs that more often than not are neither available nor advertised to the general public. If these people are so valuable, then they should be retained in the profession for which they have been trained, and in which they have accumulated so much experience. Teachers and nurses can't take early retirement on such generous packages, and their job is just as stressful as those of police officers. The 'retirement club' culture on the IOM is all part of the real cost of policing.

It states on this link that they pay 11% of their pay into their pension. [link here] and personally think it's a good scheme as I wouldn't really want 65 year old Police chasing after teenagers etc as they just wouldn't realistically catch them which would then be to the detriment of the public.

 

I do have a gripe against some Police officers 'allegedly' looking for arguments, and in this day and age, I'd have thought that they should wear cameras like this one and havins seen the video clip that went with it, looks like a decent tool to have during the late hours.rs3combo.jpg

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(Manxy. you're not related to anybody involved with the Home Affairs Department are you? You spin a very establishment line there.)

 

Police pension. Lets say for now 10% contribution and forget about inflation for ease of calculation and illustration purposes.

 

After 10 years a policeman will have accrued one years pay into the pension pot. After 30 years it will have accrued to 3 years pay.

 

But after 30 years service a policeman can retire on 2/3 pension. Retiring at 50 that might give a good 20-30 years, if not more, on a 2/3 final salary inflation proofed pension

 

It just doesn't add up does it. Even less so when you add in the whopping lump sum.

 

Aye, the pension club alright. The police sit on the top table.

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(Manxy. you're not related to anybody involved with teh Home Affairs Department are you? You spin a very establishment line there.)

 

Lets say 10% and forget about inflation for ease of calculation and illustration purposes.

 

After 10 years a policeman will have accrued one years pay into the pension pot. After 30 years it will have accrued to 3 years pay.

 

After 30 years service a policeman can retire on 2/3 pension. Retiring at 50 that might give a good 20-30 years, if not more, on a 2/3 final salary inflation proofed pension

 

It just doesn't add up does it. Even less so when you add in the whopping lump sum.

 

Aye, the pension club alright.

 

I didn't think pensions were calculated in the way you've done that. Aren't they much more complicated than that, with contributions being pooled into investments scheme and the like?

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Yes of course they are much more complicated. But that is a very simplified illustration. Clearly though, what is extracted is far, far, more than what can ever be put in.

 

Far, far more and it defies gravity.

Edited by carbon selector
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