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Ramsey Bakery


IOMRS97
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I can assure you that they know about corporate social responsibility - watch how they react when there is a scare story. They are able to get the "right" stuff in the right place quicker than almost anyone else. They "know" what their customers want and provide it.

Yes. They are unpopular because of their size and what they get up to. Weren't they avoiding tax by using Offshore Centres and weren't they also buying lots of land to prevent other competitors from getting a foot into the market?

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May as well get rid of any other Manx produce then, as it would be cheaper to buy from cheap slave labour markets across.

 

[...]If the bakery closes, then so do the farmers who rely on that market, possibly Laxey flour mill and all the people who are employed there, who pay their taxes, that pays the wages of other people from garages, to shops, to pubs, to insurance, to tradespeople and whichever way the monies go.

 

But hey, if you want to close down the bakery, then what's next, the creamery, the abattoir..what?

 

Maybe I didn't make myself clear, but I'm not advocating getting rid of Manx produce or indeed closing anything. I wouldn't necessarily even argue against subsidy on the farming/flour mill side of things if there is provable wider economic benefit. All I am saying is that woolley's argument that we needed Ramsey Bakery and the Mills as some form of food security is nonsense and simply doesn't fit the modern world.

But the "modern world" is by definition a recent anomaly. That's all it is; an anomaly. Globalisation, slave labour, ship stuff around the world mentality etc. that Tony Blair and his ilk were so keen on being duped into will not last, and the closer we can be to being able to feed ourselves in times of shortage the better it will be for us. Surely that is true for any country, not to mention the balance of trade. Too many people are afflicted by not seeing the Isle of Man in terms of a country, and more cannot see beyond the present when there is a supermarket full of imported stuff just down the road. It won't always be like that. We should be as self sufficient as we possibly can be. For an Island community in an uncertain world it's just common sense.

 

And competition is not 100% good. It isn't that simple. Market forces have brought us job insecurity and worry as work is exported to slave labour economies, lower pay, shoddy goods, long supply lines, cheap fat and sugar filled food and power concentrated in the hands of a few mega retailers who call the shots over the producers. Before cheering for competition at all costs, just have a think about whether your job might be next in the firing line.

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Phil Gawne,,,,,,,,,, do you even know what you are talking about???

 

So, Jim Duncan of Ramsey Bakeries was criticising the importation of "cheap" bread from across, and the aforementioned MHK immediately slags off Tesco, (on Manx Radio) for "the bottom line being their main driver".

http://www.manxradio.com/newsread.aspx?id=66854

 

On a visit to Shoprite/Iceland today in Douglas, as soon as you walk through the door, you are confronted with Warburtons bread and other bakery products (none of which were local), all for £1 each. Makes you wonder about the whole "Manx to the max" thing. On comparison, Tesco may sell bakery products from "across" cheaper than Ramsey Bakeries, but they are at least mostly confined to the bakery department, and not at the main entrance to the store.

 

In these tough times, of course, retailers are going to source goods that cost less and can be sold for less. Considering they have to actually ship those goods over here, maybe the question should be asked how Ramsey Bakeries can even begin to "justify" over £1.50 for a loaf of bread, when it is produced on island and does not incur the transportation costs of goods from across.

 

Another example of one of the "gravy trains" slowly coming to a halt?

Edited by manxmuppet
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Phil Gawne,,,,,,,,,, do you even know what you are talking about???

 

So, Jim Duncan of Ramsey Bakeries was criticising the importation of "cheap" bread from across, and the aforementioned MHK immediately slags off Tesco, (on Manx Radio) for "the bottom line being their main driver".

http://www.manxradio.com/newsread.aspx?id=66854

 

On a visit to Shoprite/Iceland today in Douglas, as soon as you walk through the door, you are confronted with Warburtons bread and other bakery products (none of which were local), all for £1 each. Makes you wonder about the whole "Manx to the max" thing. On comparison, Tesco may sell bakery products from "across" cheaper than Ramsey Bakeries, but they are at least mostly confined to the bakery department, and not at the main entrance to the store.

 

In these tough times, of course, retailers are going to source goods that cost less and can be sold for less. Considering they have to actually ship those goods over here, maybe the question should be asked how Ramsey Bakeries can even begin to "justify" over £1.50 for a loaf of bread, when it is produced on island and does not incur the transportation costs of goods from across.

 

Another example of one of the "gravy trains" slowly coming to a halt?

Labour is a key factor.

If the producers of 'the items' were to pay their cheap slave workers the going rate as like that on the island, then IMO, costs would be more proportionate.

 

Ramsey Bakery is unlikely to compete with that of the UK due to the volume produced and even though a container and transportation has a cost factor to get the items across, bulk buy will win on most counts.

 

One answer might be to promote their products by making sure that preservatives and whatever bad boy ingredients are not added to their goods. Keep it simple, advertise the positives and slam those who have to use ingredients that are unhealthy.

If the product is tasty and good, people don't mind paying the extra 50p for something they enjoy.

 

Personally, I love to smell the aroma of a new crusty loaf coming fresh from the oven and I can see why people on here talk about small bakeries and maybe that's one way to compete?

 

 

and a visit to a successful bakery, although the sour puss woman makes my teeth grind!

 

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In these tough times, of course, retailers are going to source goods that cost less and can be sold for less. Considering they have to actually ship those goods over here, maybe the question should be asked how Ramsey Bakeries can even begin to "justify" over £1.50 for a loaf of bread, when it is produced on island and does not incur the transportation costs of goods from across.

 

Another example of one of the "gravy trains" slowly coming to a halt?

Labour is a key factor.

If the producers of 'the items' were to pay their cheap slave workers the going rate as like that on the island, then IMO, costs would be more proportionate.

 

Ramsey Bakery is unlikely to compete with that of the UK due to the volume produced and even though a container and transportation has a cost factor to get the items across, bulk buy will win on most counts.

Absolutely true Cliff, but you are wasting your time. No matter how many times you point out the irrefutable factual reasons for the price differential, they will keep banging on about how it's a gravy train, how it's profiteering and all the other errant nonsense they all spout.

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It could be argued that more people love the smell of coffee than those who like the taste. I suspect that bread and baking is a comparable thing - the aroma of baking has been used to bring a 'homely' smell to newly built houses and the like, and I certainly remember walking past the Chester Street branch of Liptons/Presto/Safeways/etc and enjoying the waft of bread being baked each time.

 

Ramsey Bakery's offices are opposite the Ramsey Shoprite and, as often as I go there, you would easily be forgiven for thinking that the premises doesn't bake a scrap of bread at all. I've never caught any smell of baking bread there at all - (and this is my point) what a missed marketing opportunity! Before you chime in with the fact that it's all supposedly done in the wee small hours, I still seriously think they're missing a trick there. (We're all sure they really do still manufacture bread and its' not just a rebranding of imported stuff these days, right?)

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It could be argued that more people love the smell of coffee than those who like the taste. I suspect that bread and baking is a comparable thing - the aroma of baking has been used to bring a 'homely' smell to newly built houses and the like, and I certainly remember walking past the Chester Street branch of Liptons/Presto/Safeways/etc and enjoying the waft of bread being baked each time.

 

Ramsey Bakery's offices are opposite the Ramsey Shoprite and, as often as I go there, you would easily be forgiven for thinking that the premises doesn't bake a scrap of bread at all. I've never caught any smell of baking bread there at all - (and this is my point) what a missed marketing opportunity! Before you chime in with the fact that it's all supposedly done in the wee small hours, I still seriously think they're missing a trick there. (We're all sure they really do still manufacture bread and its' not just a rebranding of imported stuff these days, right?)

 

Smell should be first, sight is next and the combination of the two promotes a want and in this case, a want to taste the product.

Get the fans and air ducts open Ramsey Bakery. Let the crusty loaf of bread smell fill the air and watch your profits rise.

 

Off hand RB, do you do mini loafs or mini samples for people who don't want to buy a full loaf, but would like to sample your wares straight away or for later on?

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Such short term mentality would lead to no product at all in time of shortage when the imports dry up. Sooner or later, that day will come.

There are better ways to protect a local market than to ban imports. For example you could identify locally produce flour as a key ingredient for self sufficiency and either provide grants or tax breaks to make it more competitive vs the imported products. The quality still has to remain high to compete but at least they might be on a more level playing field with regards price.

Isn't that exactly what they did with the Laxey flour mills at the time? Gave them cheap subsidised Manx flour so that they could make a bigger margin selling local bread.

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Phil Gawne,,,,,,,,,, do you even know what you are talking about???

 

So, Jim Duncan of Ramsey Bakeries was criticising the importation of "cheap" bread from across, and the aforementioned MHK immediately slags off Tesco, (on Manx Radio) for "the bottom line being their main driver".

http://www.manxradio.com/newsread.aspx?id=66854

 

On a visit to Shoprite/Iceland today in Douglas, as soon as you walk through the door, you are confronted with Warburtons bread and other bakery products (none of which were local), all for £1 each. Makes you wonder about the whole "Manx to the max" thing. On comparison, Tesco may sell bakery products from "across" cheaper than Ramsey Bakeries, but they are at least mostly confined to the bakery department, and not at the main entrance to the store.

 

In these tough times, of course, retailers are going to source goods that cost less and can be sold for less. Considering they have to actually ship those goods over here, maybe the question should be asked how Ramsey Bakeries can even begin to "justify" over £1.50 for a loaf of bread, when it is produced on island and does not incur the transportation costs of goods from across.

 

Another example of one of the "gravy trains" slowly coming to a halt?

I have to agree with manx muppet. All the fruit & veg. in the Iceland store in Ramsey ( a Shoprite company ) is imported.

Also they now sell cigarettes & newspapers, and shortly are going to sell lottery tickets, I don't think they should be allowed to sell these items.

Our government keep telling us to support the small shops/businesses, this is going to have a big impact on the small newsagents in the precinct.

Do you have to have a licence to sell papers / cigarettes?

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Ramsey Bakery's offices are opposite the Ramsey Shoprite and, as often as I go there, you would easily be forgiven for thinking that the premises doesn't bake a scrap of bread at all. I've never caught any smell of baking bread there at all - (and this is my point) what a missed marketing opportunity! Before you chime in with the fact that it's all supposedly done in the wee small hours, I still seriously think they're missing a trick there. (We're all sure they really do still manufacture bread and its' not just a rebranding of imported stuff these days, right?)

I recall, many years ago, when I used to walk to work from Pulrose. Crossing the railway bridge, the wonderful aroma of newly-produced bread from Quirk's bakery always made me wish I'd paid more attention to having a proper breakfast.

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I have not heard a word from Mr Duncan for years must have been doing well, I remember when the old mannin line was going he was a regular saying how much we should use Ramsey Bakery local jobs and all that and he used to pay the locals minimum wage bet he has not upped the wages?

Edited by Beelzebub3
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I have to agree with manx muppet. All the fruit & veg. in the Iceland store in Ramsey ( a Shoprite company ) is imported.

Also they now sell cigarettes & newspapers, and shortly are going to sell lottery tickets, I don't think they should be allowed to sell these items.

Our government keep telling us to support the small shops/businesses, this is going to have a big impact on the small newsagents in the precinct.

Do you have to have a licence to sell papers / cigarettes?

 

Not quite true, its a50/50 mix with Robinsons stuff.

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