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Breadmaking At Home Using Manx Flour


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@Slim - The oil keeps the bread soft and pliable longer, the sugar ensures the yeast activates, which is important in a machine as rise time is limited (also makes it taste really good). I don't eat a lot of bread, but when I do, I want it to be excellent.

 

Your "overnight" recipe reminds me of a certain recipe for Ciabatta, where you only add half the flour before the first rising, then add the rest and knead, then rise a second time, then bake.

 

Your previous day's left over dough represents the first rising, the new ingredients the second.

 

That recipe is also really good for pizza.

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@Slim - The oil keeps the bread soft and pliable longer, the sugar ensures the yeast activates, which is important in a machine as rise time is limited (also makes it taste really good). I don't eat a lot of bread, but when I do, I want it to be excellent.

Yes, I'm a bit of a bread geek! I don't think either is required for most breads. I'd add some brown sugar to a recipe with a lot of wholemeal but for white flour it's generally not required. Try it without and see how you get on perhaps? I also add oil to some doughs, pizza dough will take some olive oil. For freshness I find sourdough cultures mean the bread lasts two or three days anyway, so you don't need to add oil for that purpose.

Your "overnight" recipe reminds me of a certain recipe for Ciabatta, where you only add half the flour before the first rising, then add the rest and knead, then rise a second time, then bake.

Your previous day's left over dough represents the first rising, the new ingredients the second.

Yes, you need to overnight ciabatta to get the gluten formed as it's too wet to knead. I'm adding nothing like half the 'starter' dough. My routine starts two days in advance bringing about 50g's of my live starter up to room temp, I'll build that up with feeds over two days until I've got around 250g's of starter to add to 750g's of flour to make a couple of loafs. I don't mean to be sniffy, but a bread machine won't make 'excellent' bread in my view. You can't fully automate bread, there's too many variables. You need to test to see when it's finished prooving, not rely on a timer.

 

Your audio is my bread, your bread maker my mp3 player smile.png

 

I do make quick stuff though, last nights bake was a tear and share, fast yeast, manx queen, mixed with pesto layers and mozzarella, yum!

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Slim - fancy posting some recipes with quantities and timings so I can have a go?

Sure, do you fancy a go at sourdough or prefer using regular yeast? A sourdough is easy and gives ace results, but there is a commitment in maintaining a live culture (it needs your attention for 10-20 mins a week tops).
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Slim - fancy posting some recipes with quantities and timings so I can have a go?

Sure, do you fancy a go at sourdough or prefer using regular yeast? A sourdough is easy and gives ace results, but there is a commitment in maintaining a live culture (it needs your attention for 10-20 mins a week tops).

 

See - I thought sourdough was a type of bread.

 

Perhaps something easy with regular yeast just to see how it goes at first?

 

I realise there's bound to be recipes on the net, but it's always handy to have local input about where to get flour, yeast, etc, and how to use it.

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See - I thought sourdough was a type of bread.

Sourdough is bread made through long fermentation using natural yeast cultures in the flour vs regular bread which you add manufactured yeasts.

Perhaps something easy with regular yeast just to see how it goes at first?

I realise there's bound to be recipes on the net, but it's always handy to have local input about where to get flour, yeast, etc, and how to use it.

Paul Hollywood's basic white is a good one to start with:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/paul_hollywoods_crusty_83536

 

The butter is optional, will make the bread last a bit longer and change the texture of the crust. He's using about double the amount of yeast I would too, but that's largely personal preference and speed related.

 

I'd make this with Laxey Queen, if you want to add a bit of flavour you could replace 150g or so of the white with a manx wholemeal flour. I buy them from Shoprite, they sell the yeast too, I use the allinsons.

 

Tricks to pay attention to: pay attention to the way the dough changes in texture as you knead, you learn to know when it's ready and if it needs more water and flour, then making sure the dough has at least doubled in the first rise. The second rise after shaping is the most important one to get right, it'll roughly double again, but you can poke it with a finger and observe the spring back to properly judge when it's ready.

 

Get your oven as hot as it'll go for the first 15 mins of baking, then turn it (most ovens aren't even heat) and drop the temp down to 190 or so for the remainder.

 

If you get that all sorted, you can move on to the fun things like sourdoughs and enriched breads smile.png

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Problem with the bread machine is that it's hard to tell where it's going wrong If it's dense it's either not kneaded well enough so it's collapsing or the dough isn't proving or rising enough. If you're baking without the machine you can judge when it's proved as the doughs doubled and you can test your final proof with a poke test. I'd say you need at least 7g's of yeast for 800g, make sure you're not over heating the yeast or it'll die. I tend to bake with sourdoughs rather than yeasts and you've got to be quite careful not to kill those too.

 

Are you using the fast action yeast? tends to work better in machines than the regular stuff.

 

Maybe I need to give it a try without the bread machine, at least for some loaves! I do use fast action yeast. As you say its such a variable thing.

 

Like others I have reliable results with the Waitrose flour, but I would like to strive for excellent and use local flour if that's possible.

 

Thanks for sharing the tips and recipes through this topic. thumbsup.gif

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