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Iom Met Office - What Is The Point?


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The Ronaldsway forcast usually seems pretty accurate to me, the BBC one less so because they are covering a far greater area & so wouldn't be as specific.

I worked outside for many years & listened to the Ronaldsway forcast every morning, it was usually right, or at least as any looking into the future can be.

I think most of the naysayers are people who will say anything Manx is crap, infact I'm surprised dopey dave 1987 hasn't been on yet telling us how much better & cheaper it is to get the weather forcast in England.

Whinging pomms.

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I feel that as one who has had to make extensive use of the Ronaldsway met facility I have to speak up in its, and the metmens', support. I'll start by telling you a short story about met services an

I can see how some people can be dismissive of the services the Met Office provide. If you get in your air-conned car in the morning, park in the office car park, shuffle paper all day then head home,

Is this not like what is being said on the 8000 thread? The island may need something like this because we are a separate country?   If not, then they should be replaced with an App. Or better still

Lol slim - experts on everything here. The OP has obviously assumed that apple are providing his forecast from their own met office

I have to ask him, and hope he will reply, if the Met office closed, where would IoM forecasts come from?

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Attended a Met Office presentation at DB Yacht Club a couple of years ago, Dave Boultbee being the speaker. Most interesting( if your into that sort of thing). What stuck in my mind is that most of the web based forecast, XC weather, Metcheck etc. are purely computer predictions with little or no qualified met person intervention. Also the islands position makes it prone to unique weather phenomena that are sometimes contrary to say, the UK met office forecast.

As I work outdoors and am an outdoor kind of guy, I take a keen interest in the weather. Got to say, the Ronaldsway boys usually get it pretty cock on. Worth the money IMO.

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I can see how some people can be dismissive of the services the Met Office provide. If you get in your air-conned car in the morning, park in the office car park, shuffle paper all day then head home, the weather is pretty irrelevant. The app on your phone is fine to see about possible golf on Sunday. The only time it affects you is when the boat hasn't gone, and M&S is empty. Moaning on internet forums isn't very weather dependent, either. For others though, who have boats, or work in construction or agriculture or marine industry - for whom their livelihood and very safety are weather dependent, then it's a very important service.

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Our weathermen are ok and provide a good service. I would question if we need 8 of them though, but I suppose that is from the days when we simply couldn't have enough Govenment paid and pensioned workers.

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I feel that as one who has had to make extensive use of the Ronaldsway met facility I have to speak up in its, and the metmens', support. I'll start by telling you a short story about met services and the RAF (don't all yawn at once) which also applied to the civilian aviation world but at an earlier date.

 

When I was a lad, every flying staion in the RAF had its own met section that provided the specialised met information for the base and, quite often, other government agencies in the area and local media, too. The level of expertise in these met offices was huge. There was always a core of local guys and girls who had been there since the year dot and there were always the new forecasters learning their trade passing through. Take a look at the CVs of the TV weather presenters pre late 1990s and most of them will have done 'a tour' at a flying station somewhere. The local forecasters possessed encyclopaedic knowledge about all the quirks and foibles of the local weather.

 

Alas, in the name of economy, the majority of airfield met offices were closed by the late 90s and a centralised forecasting system was introduced. This was able to provide 'big picture' forecasts but that local knowledge, for example, when the sea fog would pull back on the turning of the tide or when there would be turbulence due to terrain and certain wind direction, was lost.

 

That same level of expertise and experience has been built up at Ronaldsway, too. The opportunity to go up to the met section (although since the new edifice has been erected I'm not sure how easy that is nowadays) and have a face-to-face briefing with the forecaster has been (for me) invaluable and has enabled many of the skippers to make good decisions about fuel loads and diversion plans when adverse weather has appeared in the forecasts.

 

If your only contact with them is via Manx Radio then they may seem somewhat superfluous. Nevertheless, their forecasts that appear on the local airport or IOMGov internet are a darned sight more accurate than anything you'll pick from the Beeb or internet weather providers. For those of us whose working lives are intimately tied up in and around the weather the facility at Ronaldsway is invaluable and long may it continue. thumbsup.gif

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I feel that as one who has had to make extensive use of the Ronaldsway met facility I have to speak up in its, and the metmens', support. I'll start by telling you a short story about met services and the RAF (don't all yawn at once) which also applied to the civilian aviation world but at an earlier date.

 

When I was a lad, every flying staion in the RAF had its own met section that provided the specialised met information for the base and, quite often, other government agencies in the area and local media, too. The level of expertise in these met offices was huge. There was always a core of local guys and girls who had been there since the year dot and there were always the new forecasters learning their trade passing through. Take a look at the CVs of the TV weather presenters pre late 1990s and most of them will have done 'a tour' at a flying station somewhere. The local forecasters possessed encyclopaedic knowledge about all the quirks and foibles of the local weather.

 

Alas, in the name of economy, the majority of airfield met offices were closed by the late 90s and a centralised forecasting system was introduced. This was able to provide 'big picture' forecasts but that local knowledge, for example, when the sea fog would pull back on the turning of the tide or when there would be turbulence due to terrain and certain wind direction, was lost.

 

That same level of expertise and experience has been built up at Ronaldsway, too. The opportunity to go up to the met section (although since the new edifice has been erected I'm not sure how easy that is nowadays) and have a face-to-face briefing with the forecaster has been (for me) invaluable and has enabled many of the skippers to make good decisions about fuel loads and diversion plans when adverse weather has appeared in the forecasts.

 

If your only contact with them is via Manx Radio then they may seem somewhat superfluous. Nevertheless, their forecasts that appear on the local airport or IOMGov internet are a darned sight more accurate than anything you'll pick from the Beeb or internet weather providers. For those of us whose working lives are intimately tied up in and around the weather the facility at Ronaldsway is invaluable and long may it continue. :thumbsup:

Couldn't agree more.

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Indeed. If you look on the weather page of any quality newspaper there will be an entry for the IOM possibly under that name or Douglas or Ronaldsway. Is that because the IOM is so important? No, it is because the met office feeds data to the national service.

 

The met office isn't there to feed MR or a 'vanity project', it is a central British Isles station. How else can forecasts be made but through the collection of data from various points in the region?

 

I do wonder at the all knowing cynics sometimes. Habitual cynicism can oft look like ignorance.

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Indeed. If you look on the weather page of any quality newspaper there will be an entry for the IOM possibly under that name or Douglas or Ronaldsway. Is that because the IOM is so important? No, it is because the met office feeds data to the national service.

 

The met office isn't there to feed MR or a 'vanity project', it is a central British Isles station. How else can forecasts be made but through the collection of data from various points in the region?

 

I do wonder at the all knowing cynics sometimes. Habitual cynicism can oft look like ignorance.

 

 

Scratch the surface of most cynics and you find a frustrated idealist- someone who made the mistake of converting his ideals into expectations.

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