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Living Hope Church And Qe2 School


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Why should a Manx/British teenager have to learn about bar mitzvahs, pilgrimages to Mecca, or the five or eight or whatever noble truths of Buddhism, yet be taught nothing about how our ancestors celebrated the summer and winter solstices, or the myths and legends they believed in?

Quite right - we should bring up our kids to speak good old Anglo-Saxon, none of this imported muck.

 

 

Yes, I know before you start, Anglo-Saxon was an import - but how far do you want to go back? Caveman grunting?

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My goodness you have got to worry just what a politically correct, woolly, bureaucratic mess the UK's education system is becoming:   http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-stoke-staffordshire-2506668

Other than a desire to make lots of money.

I think in all our focus on the politicans, the civil service, the business elite, we underestimate just how powerful the churches are in the Isle of Man. Even more than the Freemasons, being a member

 

Why should a Manx/British teenager have to learn about bar mitzvahs, pilgrimages to Mecca, or the five or eight or whatever noble truths of Buddhism, yet be taught nothing about how our ancestors celebrated the summer and winter solstices, or the myths and legends they believed in?

Quite right - we should bring up our kids to speak good old Anglo-Saxon, none of this imported muck.

 

 

Yes, I know before you start, Anglo-Saxon was an import - but how far do you want to go back? Caveman grunting?

It's what many of his posts are.

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Why should a Manx/British teenager have to learn about bar mitzvahs, pilgrimages to Mecca, or the five or eight or whatever noble truths of Buddhism, yet be taught nothing about how our ancestors celebrated the summer and winter solstices, or the myths and legends they believed in?

Quite right - we should bring up our kids to speak good old Anglo-Saxon, none of this imported muck.

 

 

Yes, I know before you start, Anglo-Saxon was an import - but how far do you want to go back? Caveman grunting?

 

I don't know if you're just making fun of me but actually teaching Anglo-Saxon is a bit more university level.

 

As far as the school curriculum is concerned, other than some vague Roman presence, history didn't begin in the British Isles until 1066 and then nothing happened until Henry VIII, and then nothing happened until the Civil War, and then nothing happened until the Victorians. And of course the ordinary working people, despite being 99.9% of the population, were of no significance until the Victorian period when they suddenly started working in factories; their sudden presence in cities and their ability to survive thousands of years before wage labour came about being a complete mystery to all concerned. As Napoleon said (and as I'm sure I'll be told he never really said): history is a set of lies agreed upon.

Edited by Thomas Jefferson
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If Living Hope were giving a talk at the school, why would it matter? Is it any different from Lions? Masons? Life Boats? Living hope is basically a club, who meet every week, and help each other out when in need. They take donations, and help other people. I am not a religious nut. Other than weddings, funerals and other special occasions, I try to avoid the places. However, I don't see them as bad places. Kids can learn a lot from these people about life.

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If Living Hope were giving a talk at the school, why would it matter? Is it any different from Lions? Masons? Life Boats? Living hope is basically a club, who meet every week, and help each other out when in need. They take donations, and help other people. I am not a religious nut. Other than weddings, funerals and other special occasions, I try to avoid the places. However, I don't see them as bad places. Kids can learn a lot from these people about life.

 

You're okay with Christian Evangelical fundamentalists giving talks at our schools and handing out holy books.

 

Would you be okay with Muslim fundamentalists if they wanted to do the same?

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http://www.livinghopechurch.com/

after money like all of them they even have an easy give button for your convenience

so its a canadian church is hiring out Qe2?

 

"Living Hope" is a very common name for churches all over the world with no connection to each other.

Edited by Thomas Jefferson
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You're okay with Christian Evangelical fundamentalists giving talks at our schools and handing out holy books.

 

Would you be okay with Muslim fundamentalists if they wanted to do the same?

Fundamentalists? I am not religious, but I don't think they are fundamentalists. I would rather have this sort of group (or muslim group visiting a school to give a talk on morals and clean living, than the army/navy/air-force spreading government propaganda.
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You're okay with Christian Evangelical fundamentalists giving talks at our schools and handing out holy books.

 

Would you be okay with Muslim fundamentalists if they wanted to do the same?

Fundamentalists? I am not religious, but I don't think they are fundamentalists. I would rather have this sort of group (or muslim group visiting a school to give a talk on morals and clean living, than the army/navy/air-force spreading government propaganda.

Personally I'd prefer neither and anything like them but you feel free to choose a lesser of two evils!

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Former Evangelical Christian here. Religion-free since 2007. And a dad.

 

I who attended a recent harvest festival at a church that the school did an event at...

 

In my experience there is always a strong proselytising drive in churches who look to schools for facilities and for schools sometimes looking to churches to add flavour during the traditional times of the year like Easter, Harvest, Christmas and so on. I found myself anticipating the "Thank you God" punchlines in the chorus of every otherwise sound harvest song to be amusing rather than particularly pernicious. It was amusing to sing songs about how god has provided everything wonderful and beautiful in the world only to then have a little discussion about famine. Yep, I can't see myself singing those songs around any starving Africans either wink.png

 

Where I would draw the line is in direct proslyetising - i.e. a teacher or authority figure dictating their beliefs as fact. It's very valuable to learn about religion, particularly Christianity but at the same time it should be taught comparatively. I find it helpful to follow a litmus test of outrage: If the children are taught, "Christians believe at Christmas that Jesus the Messiah was born to save the world from their sins" then this is perfectly alright. It's a fact after all. It might help to add that Muslims also believe that Jesus lived, but that he was preparing the way for another chap who flew up to heaven on a winged horse. If the children are taught, "At Christmas that Jesus the Messiah was born to save the world from their sins" then this is as utterly outrageous as teaching them that we can't take the mountain road today because Manannan has dropped his cloak over the island to protect us all from our enemies.

 

I take Richard Dawkins' view that much "Anglican" religion in schools works like a vaccine against religion in later life. It's watered down, moderate religion that in our culture at least works like an inoculation. Hell, I went to a Catholic secondary school and I can say that the daily dose of religion shoved down our throats might have tasted bad and been completely unnecessary and silly but it didn't appear to do any of us any harm! And Catholic schoolgirls can be very naughty!

 

I shall be at the School Christmas play and I'll sing most of the religious songs, perhaps missing a few words here and there, and will likely enjoy it thoroughly smile.png

Edited by MikeW
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Former Evangelical Christian here. Religion-free since 2007. And a dad.

 

I who attended a recent harvest festival at a church that the school did an event at...

 

In my experience there is always a strong proselytising drive in churches who look to schools for facilities and for schools sometimes looking to churches to add flavour during the traditional times of the year like Easter, Harvest, Christmas and so on. I found myself anticipating the "Thank you God" punchlines in the chorus of every otherwise sound harvest song to be amusing rather than particularly pernicious. It was amusing to sing songs about how god has provided everything wonderful and beautiful in the world only to then have a little discussion about famine. Yep, I can't see myself singing those songs around any starving Africans either wink.png

 

Where I would draw the line is in direct proslyetising - i.e. a teacher or authority figure dictating their beliefs as fact. It's very valuable to learn about religion, particularly Christianity but at the same time it should be taught comparatively. I find it helpful to follow a litmus test of outrage: If the children are taught, "Christians believe at Christmas that Jesus the Messiah was born to save the world from their sins" then this is perfectly alright. It's a fact after all. It might help to add that Muslims also believe that Jesus lived, but that he was preparing the way for another chap who flew up to heaven on a winged horse. If the children are taught, "At Christmas that Jesus the Messiah was born to save the world from their sins" then this is as utterly outrageous as teaching them that we can't take the mountain road today because Manannan has dropped his cloak over the island to protect us all from our enemies.

 

I take Richard Dawkins' view that much "Anglican" religion in schools works like a vaccine against religion in later life. It's watered down, moderate religion that in our culture at least works like an inoculation. Hell, I went to a Catholic secondary school and I can say that the daily dose of religion shoved down our throats might have tasted bad and been completely unnecessary and silly but it didn't appear to do any of us any harm! And Catholic schoolgirls can be very naughty!

 

I shall be at the School Christmas play and I'll sing most of the religious songs, perhaps missing a few words here and there, and will likely enjoy it thoroughly smile.png

 

 

Aw, God bless you.

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