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The End of the TT Races


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To follow up on Boris Johnsons post about the TT putting off potential tourists. I don't agree as the TT visitors are the majority of your tourists nowadays. As someone from the UK who visits the island at TT plus at non TT times I can make the following observations.

 

Many folk in the UK have only vaguely heard of the Isle of Man. Some will confuse it with the Isle of Wight, others will have no idea it could be a holiday destination.

 

Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT.

 

For those that have considered visiting outwith TT the prohibitive travel costs put them off. Due to the ferry timings its not an easy place to go even for a long weekend. I have a pal who looked into visiting with his camper van, and it was cheaper and easier to drive to Devon for the week rather than come across on the ferry.

 

The Isle of Man tourist board don't seem to advertise a lot in the UK. A small ad in the Sunday Post with a grainy black and white photo of a hiker on a hillside that could be anywhere isn't going to entice people. The TV campaign a couple of years ago was poor too.

 

Even if people did decide to flock to the island where are they going to stay? Bit of a catch 22 that one. No one is going to open hotels if there are no tourists. Tourists aren't going to go to a place where they can't find a hotel.

 

So really, if the TT and MGP went, would there be a tourist industry on the island at all?

 

 

Possibly not, however, we might be better off financially, none of the TT expenses to pay and no department of tourism to maintain?

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To follow up on Boris Johnsons post about the TT putting off potential tourists. I don't agree as the TT visitors are the majority of your tourists nowadays. As someone from the UK who visits the island at TT plus at non TT times I can make the following observations.

Many folk in the UK have only vaguely heard of the Isle of Man. Some will confuse it with the Isle of Wight, others will have no idea it could be a holiday destination.

Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT.

For those that have considered visiting outwith TT the prohibitive travel costs put them off. Due to the ferry timings its not an easy place to go even for a long weekend. I have a pal who looked into visiting with his camper van, and it was cheaper and easier to drive to Devon for the week rather than come across on the ferry.

The Isle of Man tourist board don't seem to advertise a lot in the UK. A small ad in the Sunday Post with a grainy black and white photo of a hiker on a hillside that could be anywhere isn't going to entice people. The TV campaign a couple of years ago was poor too.

Even if people did decide to flock to the island where are they going to stay? Bit of a catch 22 that one. No one is going to open hotels if there are no tourists. Tourists aren't going to go to a place where they can't find a hotel.So really, if the TT and MGP went, would there be a tourist industry on the island at all?

 

Possibly not, however, we might be better off financially, none of the TT expenses to pay and no department of tourism to maintain?

Possibly. So if for whatever reason the TT races become unpopular or attract less visitors it should be up to Manx residents to decide if it continues, and what direction the island will take in the future. Although I don't think that will be an issue for a while yet.

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To follow up on Boris Johnsons post about the TT putting off potential tourists. I don't agree as the TT visitors are the majority of your tourists nowadays. As someone from the UK who visits the island at TT plus at non TT times I can make the following observations.

Many folk in the UK have only vaguely heard of the Isle of Man. Some will confuse it with the Isle of Wight, others will have no idea it could be a holiday destination.

Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT.

For those that have considered visiting outwith TT the prohibitive travel costs put them off. Due to the ferry timings its not an easy place to go even for a long weekend. I have a pal who looked into visiting with his camper van, and it was cheaper and easier to drive to Devon for the week rather than come across on the ferry.

The Isle of Man tourist board don't seem to advertise a lot in the UK. A small ad in the Sunday Post with a grainy black and white photo of a hiker on a hillside that could be anywhere isn't going to entice people. The TV campaign a couple of years ago was poor too.

Even if people did decide to flock to the island where are they going to stay? Bit of a catch 22 that one. No one is going to open hotels if there are no tourists. Tourists aren't going to go to a place where they can't find a hotel.So really, if the TT and MGP went, would there be a tourist industry on the island at all?

 

Possibly not, however, we might be better off financially, none of the TT expenses to pay and no department of tourism to maintain?

Possibly. So if for whatever reason the TT races become unpopular or attract less visitors it should be up to Manx residents to decide if it continues, and what direction the island will take in the future. Although I don't think that will be an issue for a while yet.

The opinion of Manx residents is of no consequence as far as IOM Gov. (COMIN) are concerned with the exception of a couple of months every four years.

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To follow up on Boris Johnsons post about the TT putting off potential tourists. I don't agree as the TT visitors are the majority of your tourists nowadays. As someone from the UK who visits the island at TT plus at non TT times I can make the following observations.

Many folk in the UK have only vaguely heard of the Isle of Man. Some will confuse it with the Isle of Wight, others will have no idea it could be a holiday destination.

Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT.

For those that have considered visiting outwith TT the prohibitive travel costs put them off. Due to the ferry timings its not an easy place to go even for a long weekend. I have a pal who looked into visiting with his camper van, and it was cheaper and easier to drive to Devon for the week rather than come across on the ferry.

The Isle of Man tourist board don't seem to advertise a lot in the UK. A small ad in the Sunday Post with a grainy black and white photo of a hiker on a hillside that could be anywhere isn't going to entice people. The TV campaign a couple of years ago was poor too.

Even if people did decide to flock to the island where are they going to stay? Bit of a catch 22 that one. No one is going to open hotels if there are no tourists. Tourists aren't going to go to a place where they can't find a hotel.

So really, if the TT and MGP went, would there be a tourist industry on the island at all?

I would like to add my voice to that of ' Pale Rider '. His observations are both sensible and as far as I can see true. He does not however seem to be aware that residents on the Island who only receive ' Freeview ' do not get ITV4 as part of their package, so cannot see the TT coverage. As for most of his views , I would say they are dead on. There are those on the Island who see it only as a Tax Haven in which to hide their money while taking advantage of every Government ' Handout ' to enable them to do so. Any interference , be it by Traditional Events, Culture ( excluding the morning events of Tynwald Day ) Road Closures ( other than 'Vintage Car Events' ) are viewed as spoiling their privalaged lives and they are ' Hell Bent ' on stopping them. For the rest of us mortals, the TT and events like it, are part of Island life, to be enjoyed by all who wish to. If you don't like such events then avoid them with Holidays or moving to another part of the Island during them. Or preferably off it

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To follow up on Boris Johnsons post about the TT putting off potential tourists. I don't agree as the TT visitors are the majority of your tourists nowadays. As someone from the UK who visits the island at TT plus at non TT times I can make the following observations.

 

Many folk in the UK have only vaguely heard of the Isle of Man. Some will confuse it with the Isle of Wight, others will have no idea it could be a holiday destination.

 

Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT.

 

For those that have considered visiting outwith TT the prohibitive travel costs put them off. Due to the ferry timings its not an easy place to go even for a long weekend. I have a pal who looked into visiting with his camper van, and it was cheaper and easier to drive to Devon for the week rather than come across on the ferry.

 

The Isle of Man tourist board don't seem to advertise a lot in the UK. A small ad in the Sunday Post with a grainy black and white photo of a hiker on a hillside that could be anywhere isn't going to entice people. The TV campaign a couple of years ago was poor too.

 

Even if people did decide to flock to the island where are they going to stay? Bit of a catch 22 that one. No one is going to open hotels if there are no tourists. Tourists aren't going to go to a place where they can't find a hotel.

 

So really, if the TT and MGP went, would there be a tourist industry on the island at all?

 

Possibly not, however, we might be better off financially, none of the TT expenses to pay and no department of tourism to maintain?

 

 

Are you trying to say that all of those thousands of tourists are of no financial benefit to the island at all? Here we go again, uninformed garble from the anti TT brigade.
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To follow up on Boris Johnsons post about the TT putting off potential tourists. I don't agree as the TT visitors are the majority of your tourists nowadays. As someone from the UK who visits the island at TT plus at non TT times I can make the following observations.

 

Many folk in the UK have only vaguely heard of the Isle of Man. Some will confuse it with the Isle of Wight, others will have no idea it could be a holiday destination.

 

Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT.

 

For those that have considered visiting outwith TT the prohibitive travel costs put them off. Due to the ferry timings its not an easy place to go even for a long weekend. I have a pal who looked into visiting with his camper van, and it was cheaper and easier to drive to Devon for the week rather than come across on the ferry.

 

The Isle of Man tourist board don't seem to advertise a lot in the UK. A small ad in the Sunday Post with a grainy black and white photo of a hiker on a hillside that could be anywhere isn't going to entice people. The TV campaign a couple of years ago was poor too.

 

Even if people did decide to flock to the island where are they going to stay? Bit of a catch 22 that one. No one is going to open hotels if there are no tourists. Tourists aren't going to go to a place where they can't find a hotel.

 

So really, if the TT and MGP went, would there be a tourist industry on the island at all?

 

Possibly not, however, we might be better off financially, none of the TT expenses to pay and no department of tourism to maintain?

 

Are you trying to say that all of those thousands of tourists are of no financial benefit to the island at all? Here we go again, uninformed garble from the anti TT brigade.

Back to the old question then, what is the total annual cost of staging the TT and I mean total no exclusions and what is the total financial gain, where are the unedited non creative accurate official figures from IOM gov?

 

PS I am not particularly anti TT having spent many happy years as a biker and enjoying the TT, MGP and SH100.

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Many folk in the UK will have heard of the TT. Many who are not into bikes will have no idea what it entails. Remember its only in the last couple of years that itv4s coverage has given an insight to those that have never followed the TT.

 

Sadly this is another of the lies perpetuated in recent years by a Government anxious to justify the spending of millions on a UK TV contractor. The constant barrage of plaudits from Government abouut North One has deliberately set out to creat e the belief that TV coverage was some kind of ghetto in the past and only the cleverness of our politicians has saved it from the grave.

 

Sadly that's not true, The TT was seen same night on BBC and ITV before North One, and all over the world too. These days the S100 gets more TV exposure than the TT and it costs a hell of a lot less to produce.

 

The clue is in the press releases they issue, which continually harp on about how the coverage has gone up every year since the new company took over. What it doesn't mention is that it fell through the floor the year they started and the only way after that is in fact, up. And at half a million pounds a year I'd be seriously pissed off if they didn't do a bloody good job.

 

However, don't believe all you read.

 

Or you might start to wonder how it is that TT attendances have gone up between 5 and 10 per cent every year for the past ten years but there's still only 30 thousand people showing up each year. How does that work?

 

Easy. Government maths. Means what they want it to mean.

 

Fact is, the film idustry f*cked off because everyone else brought their tax incentives in line with ours, the banks are leaving because the Island isn't a tax haven any more, and apart from e-gaming, another business model of dubious morality, Bell & Co haven't got a pot to piss in or an idea worth having.

 

Getting the TT World Championship off the ground is their last hope.

 

Still, better than fishing and farming. They don't make headlines, so where's the glamour in a decent production-based economy.

Edited by jonnyrotten
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We are told that it costs c.£3,500,000 to stage the TT.

 

40,000 tourists spending an average of £750 on the island during their visit means that it pumps £30,000,000 into the Manx economy.

 

I agree, I'd love to see some form of accounts to back up claims that the TT makes a profit to the exchequer. I just don't know if we will ever see anything that would make any sense since they seem to have cut the budget for the races this year. Not a good sign if the money spent generates an equivalent profit?

 

I am however convinced of its importance to the general economy of the island, along with the Manx Grand Prix and S100.

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We are told that it costs c.£3,500,000 to stage the TT.

 

40,000 tourists spending an average of £750 on the island during their visit means that it pumps £30,000,000 into the Manx economy.

 

I agree, I'd love to see some form of accounts to back up claims that the TT makes a profit to the exchequer. I just don't know if we will ever see anything that would make any sense since they seem to have cut the budget for the races this year. Not a good sign if the money spent generates an equivalent profit?

 

I am however convinced of its importance to the general economy of the island, along with the Manx Grand Prix and S100.

Sorry, I don't believe 40,000 for TT, possibly 40,000 arrivals during the TT period many of whom could be day trippers, business men or visiting relatives and most of them will not spend £750 per head, not all of the spend benefits the IOM ie Tesco not paying taxes here, I also believe the 3.5 million spend to be an under estimate, there is a lot of creative accounting going on within IOM gov.

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We are told that it costs c.£3,500,000 to stage the TT.

 

40,000 tourists spending an average of £750 on the island during their visit means that it pumps £30,000,000 into the Manx economy.

 

I agree, I'd love to see some form of accounts to back up claims that the TT makes a profit to the exchequer. I just don't know if we will ever see anything that would make any sense since they seem to have cut the budget for the races this year. Not a good sign if the money spent generates an equivalent profit?

 

I am however convinced of its importance to the general economy of the island, along with the Manx Grand Prix and S100.

Sorry, I don't believe 40,000 for TT, possibly 40,000 arrivals during the TT period many of whom could be day trippers, business men or visiting relatives and most of them will not spend £750 per head, not all of the spend benefits the IOM ie Tesco not paying taxes here, I also believe the 3.5 million spend to be an under estimate, there is a lot of creative accounting going on within IOM gov.

 

 

I'm not talking about taxes and income to the exchequer, I'm talking about money pumped into the economy of the island, which helps keep our wheels in motion.
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The figures reported by IoM Govt for TT in 2013 were gross visitor spending of £26.2million. This they described as having an economic contribution of £18.9 million and an exchequer benefit of £3.5 million. The net costs to DED once commercial revenue costs had been offset against income was £2.6 million. So on the face of it the Govt make a profit of £900,000. However it ignores all the other costs for the TT which are not in the DED's budget, police overtime, hospital staff etc, DoI staff, TT course maintenance, insurance.

 

It should also be remembered that much of the spend also ends up in the hands of the Steam Packet and Airlines and nobody has as far as I am aware ever published an estimate of the productivity lost by other businesses during the TT period

 

The IoM might be a poorer place overall without the TT, as although many of many not like the actual races or the number of dangerous idiots on the road most of us like some element of it even if it is only the fireworks and the red arrows, but whether the Govt would be worse off I think even based on their figures it might be open to some doubt.

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not all of the spend benefits the IOM ie Tesco not paying taxes here, what Last Login has said in post #177

 

Tesco now pays tax here.

OK, my bad, I missed that, however, I reckon that much of the gross income from the TT does not stay on the Island, what Last Login has said in post 177 above makes a lot of sense.

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