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"Oh not you again.

 

Regards

 

Declan"

 

Seems counter-productive to managing an ongoing stakeholder relationship. If you are seeking to imply that by missing of the "Kind" it's just a subtle way of telling them to stop bothering you. Well, is that the way an organisation wants its employees to communicate with each other? Better to be open, surely.

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I prefer the more urban approach   k thx bai

I disagree   'thank you for your thoughts, they are most welcome'   KR... is suitable   'oh, God, not you again   R. is suitable   peace out

I've waiting over twenty years for you to admit that.

If you are seeking to imply that by missing of the "Kind" it's just a subtle way of telling them to stop bothering you. Well, is that the way an organisation wants its employees to communicate with each other? Better to be open, surely.

 

wohaaa... who contextualised to between employees?

 

'dear rockingman festival,

 

i'm not bothered about your excuses, i just want my £200 back'

 

regards ...

 

??

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I suppose I contextualised it to between colleagues, it's too informal for most business communication to clients, and too formal between friends. So I suppose it's only really relevant between colleagues, or when I'm the customer and want to create a relaxed tone.

 

I wouldn't use regards in the Rockingham example. You don't mean it, don't use it. In fact, you're not even extending them the courtesy of capital letters, so regards seems superfluous.

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You're best signing off e-mails not according to what you mean, or what you feel, but rather what the recipient wants to see. Some people will react better to a 'Kind regards' or 'Warm regards' than a bullet pointed list of 'do this' and 'do it right now!'

 

Difficulty is working out what the recipient would prefer.

 

You learn all this guff on management-type communication courses, in case anyone wondered. If interested google 'Strength Deployment Inventory'

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I wouldn't use regards in the Rockingham example. You don't mean it, don't use it. In fact, you're not even extending them the courtesy of capital letters, so regards seems superfluous.

 

You're quite correct :)

 

I was merely, and quickly, trying to bring a more specific example into play. My example wasn't the best, as I wouldn't have bothered with 'Regards'

 

JFK / TJ

 

Your a DICK

 

Kind Regards

 

...

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"thank you for your assistance" always works if you want something......

F off and hand over your lunch money. Thank you for your assistance.

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You're best signing off e-mails not according to what you mean, or what you feel, but rather what the recipient wants to see. Some people will react better to a 'Kind regards' or 'Warm regards' than a bullet pointed list of 'do this' and 'do it right now!'

 

Difficulty is working out what the recipient would prefer.

 

You learn all this guff on management-type communication courses, in case anyone wondered. If interested google 'Strength Deployment Inventory'

I do take this into account, but then you do have to consider your own...sanity and apply some good sense to these things.

 

I mean, 'kind regards' and 'regards', it shouldn't REALLY matter. They don't convey much meaning at all. They're just things you have to stick on the bottom of an e-mail to 'close it off'. Same as 'sincerely' and 'faithfully'. Yes, there is a rule about when to use each of these in letters, but it isn't a big deal at all, it is just a tradition.

 

But to quibble over 'King regards' and 'Regards' is a bit baffling to me, as it enters into the modern world of e-mail where there isn't that much of a history and which is all part of the dry, often vacuous language of commercialise or officialese.

 

Honestly, if you think it is a serious matter then you need to pay more attention to what does matter in e-mails. Most people who write e-mails write poorly and without regard to the person reading, such as use of 'Please do not hesitate...', Please find attached...', 're', 're:' or 're.' etc., and the use of 'advise' to mean 'inform'.

I think these things are more important, unless you are looking to run on autopilot when writing.

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