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4G Has Arrived


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Yeah,

 

An app was an application, usually a covering of pink cream, chosen for its coverage.

 

A bolt on was a fancy horn for your push bike, or something to snigger at behind the bike shed.

 

A mobile hung over your baby brothers cot.

 

A charger was an angry attraction in a safari park.

 

Apple made records (plastic disks with one long groove) and a groove was hip ( now a body part that can be replaced ).

 

No wonder old people get confused.

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They would be better off getting 2g & 3g to work properly first.

I checked via MT website and the result is in - yippee my sim card is 4G ready - yay..... but my tariff is not 4G ready and nor is my handset - boo... well I am already paying more than enough so they

I know some young folk may find it hard to believe, but those of us who grew up in the sixties and seventies managed perfectly well without all these fancy gadgets.

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I got speeds of up to 50Mbps on my phone in Douglas earlier, fairly consistently - which is pretty impressive for mobile. No complaints there. The real test will be when the number of concurrent users increases. There is no denying there is a speed increase.

 

Sure seem to be hedging their bets 4G will be a replacement for a landline and traditional broadband. That, I don't foresee. Acceptable for some, perhaps, widespread adoption - I am yet to be convinced.

Those speeds on a mobile are astounding, to say the least.

 

4G I think will replace landlines in some areas of the world, network capacity dependent, due to cost or lack of infrastructure, but I think it will take a lot to shake the negative rap Sure have at the moment in terms of signal and network performance. They're not the best, but they're a lot cheaper and do enough.

 

Got a message through on GiffGaff today saying I could be part of the 4G trial but I've already got a goodybag and must admit, I've already churned through a lot of data, whilst still being on Wi-Fi most of the time. My phone is currently adamant that the calculator has used approximately 300mb of data in a week.

 

 

Another thing I've noticed is new Samsung handsets have a download booster mode which allegedly will use the 4G network and Wi-Fi network in combination to provide higher speeds, but whether it works or not, or whether it is useful, is yet to be seen. (I'm thinking of Air View, Smart Stay and so forth)

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My life is complete, all the Worlds problems pale into insignificance before the God 4G. When will people see that this ever changing mass of mostly pointless Information is costing everyone a fortune. Non such thing as a free lunch

 

I just chuckled at that last line, Appetites deliver lunch to everyone in my office every day and we don't have to pay for it smile.png

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I know some young folk may find it hard to believe, but those of us who grew up in the sixties and seventies managed perfectly well without all these fancy gadgets.

 

It is my hope that those who grow up in the 2060s and 2070s will live without them as well. If we continue on our current trajectory, these tools of our convenience will become the means of our enslavement.

Edited by Thomas Jefferson
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The G just stands for generation, as in the higher the number the newer and (supposedly) faster the mobile communication speed is.

Thanks. So what does the "E" number mean when my mobile data is on? I could have sworn it used to say G.

 

 

In terms of speed it goes: G, E, 3G, H, H+, 4G

 

So the EDGE is better than GPRS but ideally you should be receiving 3G or HSPA

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I just chuckled at that last line, Appetites deliver lunch to everyone in my office every day and we don't have to pay for it smile.png

Sorry, but that comes out of the salary budget. There is no such thing as a free lunch smile.png
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The G just stands for generation, as in the higher the number the newer and (supposedly) faster the mobile communication speed is.

Thanks. So what does the "E" number mean when my mobile data is on? I could have sworn it used to say G.

 

In terms of speed it goes: G, E, 3G, H, H+, 4G

 

So the EDGE is better than GPRS but ideally you should be receiving 3G or HSPA

 

Sadly you may struggle to get any of the above. 3G is better switched off in our part of Douglas, so you can avoid the disappointment of watching your phone flatten its battery in a couple of hours while it struggles to make contact with the network. 2G (E and H if you prefer) works but rather stone age and pathetically, and often drops out. This morning I had an unintelligible conversation with an important business contact in Germany who made the silly mistake of imagining it would be a good idea to call me on my mobile while I was still at home, and just now I have been unable to reply to a text message while in my office. If I go and stand on one leg in the car park with the phone aimed hopefully at arm's length I can usually get through at the second or third attempt (not even the fourth time today, despite having four out of five bars of signal strength showing) but it means leaving my desk and my train of thought to achieve it. It works in my garden too but it's much harder to have a conversation when the phone is that far above you, and of course all the neighbours can hear what you're shouting at it.

 

4G? Fur coat no knickers.

 

Only works in the phone shop because the link is in the ceiling 2 feet above your head.

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Show me a country anywhere where mobile phones and mobile data work faultlessly everywhere?

 

There's another post on that stupid manx shops Facebook page this morning about someone getting slow data on Sure. Yea you will, if you are somewhere with crap signal, or in a steel framed building, or buried in the middle of a block of flats, or about a million other reasons. I get good data on sure both at home and at work, can't say I ever really struggle out and about either unless I am somewhere where you wouldn't realistically expect full coverage.

 

It's technology limited by the real word and the amount of money they have to spend on the infrastructure, coupled with planning issues for masts etc. If they spend more on infrastructure they have to put the prices up and people whine.

 

They can't win because the general public have unreasonable expectations. I am so glad I don't work in customer services for MT or Sure, you must spend your whole life dealing with whoppers wanting a discount because they can't stream stuff all day every day in the middle of a steel framed block of apartments with foiled backed plasterboard everywhere at the bottom of a cliff.

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The G just stands for generation, as in the higher the number the newer and (supposedly) faster the mobile communication speed is.

Thanks. So what does the "E" number mean when my mobile data is on? I could have sworn it used to say G.

 

In terms of speed it goes: G, E, 3G, H, H+, 4G

 

So the EDGE is better than GPRS but ideally you should be receiving 3G or HSPA

 

Sadly you may struggle to get any of the above. 3G is better switched off in our part of Douglas, so you can avoid the disappointment of watching your phone flatten its battery in a couple of hours while it struggles to make contact with the network. 2G (E and H if you prefer) works but rather stone age and pathetically, and often drops out. This morning I had an unintelligible conversation with an important business contact in Germany who made the silly mistake of imagining it would be a good idea to call me on my mobile while I was still at home, and just now I have been unable to reply to a text message while in my office. If I go and stand on one leg in the car park with the phone aimed hopefully at arm's length I can usually get through at the second or third attempt (not even the fourth time today, despite having four out of five bars of signal strength showing) but it means leaving my desk and my train of thought to achieve it. It works in my garden too but it's much harder to have a conversation when the phone is that far above you, and of course all the neighbours can hear what you're shouting at it.

 

4G? Fur coat no knickers.

 

Only works in the phone shop because the link is in the ceiling 2 feet above your head.

 

 

Getting 50 meg in our offices in Douglas, so it's not quite as bleak as that.

 

and 32 up near Point of Ayre the other day

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It's technology limited by the real word and the amount of money they have to spend on the infrastructure, coupled with planning issues for masts etc. If they spend more on infrastructure they have to put the prices up and people whine.

 

They can't win because the general public have unreasonable expectations. I am so glad I don't work in customer services for MT or Sure, you must spend your whole life dealing with whoppers wanting a discount because they can't stream stuff all day every day in the middle of a steel framed block of apartments with foiled backed plasterboard everywhere at the bottom of a cliff.

 

Seven times faster than 3g and 95% coverage is what it says on the MT webpage right this moment.

If we have unreasonable expectations, whose fault is that?

 

Obviously snail mail is about as fast as 3G where I live, so at least that part could be right.

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Show me a country anywhere where mobile phones and mobile data work faultlessly everywhere?

 

North Korea. The Dear Leader has personally said so, which means it's true.

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Talking of mobile phones, I was discussing contract vs payg with a collegue today and this is what they do:

 

Buy a £20 PAYG every month and get unlimited data, £20 phone credit, free texts and calls.

 

Basically because the free texts are so generous, the £20 carries over every month. She then has a load of cash 'in the bank' for when she goes abroad to blow on calls and data.

 

vs the equivalent 'smartphone' pay monthly tariff:

 

£20 a month 'sim free', 1gb data, 175 mins and no 'carry over' of the credit, so it's lost every month.

 

Pay monthly looks like a pretty shitty deal. Why do they reward people who don't have a contract vs those that commit? Have I missed anything?

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