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The trouble at the moment with electric cars on the island is that we don't offer the £5000 subsidy to buyers as in the UK. Also our terrain puts the battery under a lot more load than much of the urban areas of the UK.

True Max, but if you source a car already registered, with only delivery mileage, from a UK dealer, the £5k is already off the price.Terrain, among other factors, does affect electric vehicles but not to such an extent that they aren't practical - I've had one for 2 1/2 years. Dear to buy but very cheap to run!

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These driverless cars would cause chaos.   Just imagine a roundabout here with a car approaching that actually knows how to use them.   Terrible scenes

The IOM should certainly go for electric cars. Nobody is going very far on the island. There should be charging points in every car park by now.

Would it be a good way of using surplus capacity in the power station? If so then of course the HI-TECH ISLAND - WHERE YOU CAN should take a great leap forward & embrace the driverless electric car / bus / bike

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This is surely wonderful news for the TT organisers. Rider- less bikes, super safe and no risk to competitors or the public, now that virtually all the viewing spots have been banned. They are already ahead of the game with their Spectator-less grandstands.

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I don't see the point in driverless cars. They are like Airbus planes etc. These planes are effectively pilotless / driverless, but still require qualified staff in case something goes wrong. Same goes for driverless cars. So, the thought of blind people, infirm people, etc. being able to use them is a non starter. No, you will not be able to send your car to go on it's own and pick up the kids from school, or drive you home drunk from the pub. Who is going to go to the expense of passing a driving test, and then pay some extortionate amount of money for a car that drives itself, and is bound to break down due to the amount of electronics?

 

Pointless.

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I don't see the point in driverless cars. They are like Airbus planes etc. These planes are effectively pilotless / driverless, but still require qualified staff in case something goes wrong. Same goes for driverless cars. So, the thought of blind people, infirm people, etc. being able to use them is a non starter. No, you will not be able to send your car to go on it's own and pick up the kids from school, or drive you home drunk from the pub. Who is going to go to the expense of passing a driving test, and then pay some extortionate amount of money for a car that drives itself, and is bound to break down due to the amount of electronics?

 

Pointless.

Hmmm, I'm not so sure. I can see driverless cars becoming part of life (albeit not in a major way for some time yet) in the future.

 

If extended testing proves them to be at least as safe as a car with driver then you'd expect taxi firms, courier companies, pizza delivery and many more being interested, which is worrying.

 

Don't know what they'd do about all the vomit in the back of taxis at the weekend though. Mind you, you could have sex on the way home and still go to your own respective houses. Handy for affairs I suppose.

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... the thought of blind people, infirm people, etc. being able to use them is a non starter. ...

 

Pointless.

Google deliberately gave one of the first driverless cars to someone who's blind. He's road legal in Nevada, Florida and California - though the maps available give him only a tiny proportion of those states to drive in!

 

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The IOM should certainly go for electric cars. Nobody is going very far on the island.

There should be charging points in every car park by now.

With the price of our leccy?

 

If you charge your car after a certain time (midnight?) the MEA give you a discounted rate. So it could make sense economy wise; but the initial cost is still prohibitive at around £20k for a Citroen C1. The UK gave a £5k discount to encourage sales. Last time I checked it was around £0.01 per mile whereas my Toyota Aygo (similar car to the Citroen C1) is around £0.11/mile

 

Some manufacturers lease the battery on a monthly basis. I've driven one and the torque was good, as was the speed at around 40mph tops. However the battery life/range is affected by ambient temp; it drops when it's colder.

 

One consideration is as it's so quiet, pedestrians have a habit of stepping off the kerb in front of you on account they've not heard you coming.

 

There is a charging point at the Old Grammar School car park in Castletown. Not sure whether you have to put a shilling in like a parking meter or if it's for free...

 

Another consideration is a liquid propane gas conversion (LPG).

 

 

Though some LPG conversions have been known to explode. See white car on left...

 

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=acd_1398501696

 

TBT.

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I don't see the point in driverless cars. They are like Airbus planes etc. These planes are effectively pilotless / driverless, but still require qualified staff in case something goes wrong. Same goes for driverless cars. So, the thought of blind people, infirm people, etc. being able to use them is a non starter. No, you will not be able to send your car to go on it's own and pick up the kids from school, or drive you home drunk from the pub. Who is going to go to the expense of passing a driving test, and then pay some extortionate amount of money for a car that drives itself, and is bound to break down due to the amount of electronics?

 

Pointless.

 

Benefits of driverless cars:

 

Statistics say 90 per cent of accidents are caused by human error. Eliminate the human from the situation and you eliminate 90 per cent of accidents.

 

For the most part driving = commuting, and is neither enjoyable nor convenmient, just a daunting necessity. Driverless cars change all that. You can work, rest or play and still travel in your own car.

 

Autonomous mode can be switched off. So when the roads are clear, or when you visit a place like the Isle of Man where there are fewer speed retstrictions, you're free to drive for pleasure as much as you want, or until you have that accident.

 

Platooning: networked and mutually aware vehicles will be able to form little groups, or platoons. Since driverless cars are capable of driving very much closer to each other front to back and side to side than mere humans, you get more cars on existing motorways, easing traffic congestion and saving a fortune on future investment.

 

Parking: same applies here, with added benefits that self-parking cars can make appointments at airports or hotels or even tourist attractions, drop you off at the main gate and come back for you later. Because they aren't afraid of underground car parks we can use more city centre real estate for parks and buildings and park the cars out of sight underground, far more densely than any human driver can mange. (Insert sexist joke here.)

 

Downside of autonomous cars: Erm...

Edited by jonnyrotten
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The IOM should certainly go for electric cars. Nobody is going very far on the island.

There should be charging points in every car park by now.

With the price of our leccy?

 

If you charge your car after a certain time (midnight?) the MEA give you a discounted rate. So it could make sense economy wise; but the initial cost is still prohibitive at around £20k for a Citroen C1. The UK gave a £5k discount to encourage sales. Last time I checked it was around £0.01 per mile whereas my Toyota Aygo (similar car to the Citroen C1) is around £0.11/mile

 

Some manufacturers lease the battery on a monthly basis. I've driven one and the torque was good, as was the speed at around 40mph tops. However the battery life/range is affected by ambient temp; it drops when it's colder.

 

One consideration is as it's so quiet, pedestrians have a habit of stepping off the kerb in front of you on account they've not heard you coming.

 

There is a charging point at the Old Grammar School car park in Castletown. Not sure whether you have to put a shilling in like a parking meter or if it's for free...

 

Another consideration is a liquid propane gas conversion (LPG).

 

 

Though some LPG conversions have been known to explode. See white car on left...

 

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=acd_1398501696

 

TBT.

You can get a special meter for off-peak charging and there are a couple of free power points for charging (not chargers as such) in Castletown and Douglas - if you can get to them as they tend to be obstructed by conventional cars. This is obviously a gimmick rather than a serious attempt to address the issue of EV charging. The point about cold weather is correct - range is reduced and of course any extra demands such as heating/demisting reduces the range further still. Acceleration is very impressive and top speed (Nissan Leaf) is close to 100mph though obviously if you have a heavy right foot the range will suffer accordingly! Some countries are actively encouraging the use of electric vehicles - but the Isle of Man isn't one of them. No incentives are being offered - quite the opposite in fact as the vehicle licence (tax disc) for zero/low-emission vehicles (and indeed other classes of vehicle) is higher on the Isle of Man than the UK!

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