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These driverless cars would cause chaos.   Just imagine a roundabout here with a car approaching that actually knows how to use them.   Terrible scenes

The IOM should certainly go for electric cars. Nobody is going very far on the island. There should be charging points in every car park by now.

A driverless car would make a great bomb delivery system. Suicide bombers could be just bombers!

 

 

So does the Royal Mail, Fedex and so on. We seem to manage okay, despite the fact that all manner of explosives and other nasties have been successfully delivered over the years.

 

We have driverless trains already.

 

And Cliff, they have cost a few jobs I'm sure, but so does all automation, like ticket machines and check-in desks and so on. Hope you're not suggesting we halt the march of progress in order to preserve certain types of employment over and above others which might arise frpom the application of technological advance?

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I'm all for technological advance, but there has to be some balance surely? If everything were automated then what's left? If, hypothetically, all vehicles were driverless, then that's a whole industry wiped out (not to mention all of the other industries feeding from and providing to).

 

Whatever types of employment arise from the application of technological advance - with constant strive for efficiency - you can guarantee a hell of a lot less people will be required to fill the roles.

 

Survival of the fittest I suppose.

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Saying that 90% of accidents are caused by human error, and removing the human element will eliminate 90% of crashes is like saying 50% of people die of cancer, and eliminating cancer will eliminate 50% of deaths. It doesn't. It just means they will die of something else.

 

These vehicles do not use modern technology. They use tried and tested technology that is virtually out of date. There are so many sensors, cameras, micro-switches, etc. that need to be clean and in tip top working order, that the vehicle will require an incredible amount of maintenance. What happens if the car drives itself through a puddle that it does not understand. How can it recognise floods? Snow? Ice. What happens when horse shit covers the sensors on the left hand side of the car and it loses the ability to drive itself?

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Lots of moral, philosophical and eithical problems arise from the introduction of new tecnologies, but in general automation replaces jobs that weren't veryy much fun in the first place. Car factories now use robots to build cars, and the benefit is that modern cars are much better made than old ones were. The downside is all those jobs that were lost. However you could argue that people who were once sweating their cobs off fitting heater boxes to Vauxhall cavaliers at Luton are now working in much more amenable surroundings selling pot plants and DIY gear or coffee and cake etc, If Starbucks and Homebase have replaced the production line, the quality of life has risen all round.

 

Saving people from dying in car accidents does not of course prevent them from dying of other things later on. However the point is that all those lives can be saved. The WHO regards auto accident fatalities as a major epidemic. If they get cancer soon afterwards then that's not really the issue.

 

Amazingly all the sensors on cars seem to work well in the case of everyday road grime. Maybe that's because they've been designed that way. Car makers may possibly have thought all this through. Autonomous-mode cars do not rely on a single sensor or type of sensor per function, they have multiple sensors and computers which combine the information to provide decisions. Thus they assess traffic on the basis of several radars, several infra-reds, several normal camers, information from GPS and GSM and the internet.

 

They may not be perfect now but they will be foolproof and failsafe in the future.

 

Remember you're living in a country that was the first to be unafraid of that bnew-fangled invention, the horseless carriage. If it wasn't for that we might still all be driving along behind a man with a red flag. And thank god we didn't believe the man who said that it was impossible for human beings to travel above 30 mph without suffocating.

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Lots of moral, philosophical and eithical problems arise from the introduction of new tecnologies, but in general automation replaces jobs that weren't veryy much fun in the first place. Car factories now use robots to build cars, and the benefit is that modern cars are much better made than old ones were. The downside is all those jobs that were lost. However you could argue that people who were once sweating their cobs off fitting heater boxes to Vauxhall cavaliers at Luton are now working in much more amenable surroundings selling pot plants and DIY gear or coffee and cake etc, If Starbucks and Homebase have replaced the production line, the quality of life has risen all round.

 

Saving people from dying in car accidents does not of course prevent them from dying of other things later on. However the point is that all those lives can be saved. The WHO regards auto accident fatalities as a major epidemic. If they get cancer soon afterwards then that's not really the issue.

 

Amazingly all the sensors on cars seem to work well in the case of everyday road grime. Maybe that's because they've been designed that way. Car makers may possibly have thought all this through. Autonomous-mode cars do not rely on a single sensor or type of sensor per function, they have multiple sensors and computers which combine the information to provide decisions. Thus they assess traffic on the basis of several radars, several infra-reds, several normal camers, information from GPS and GSM and the internet.

 

They may not be perfect now but they will be foolproof and failsafe in the future.

 

Remember you're living in a country that was the first to be unafraid of that bnew-fangled invention, the horseless carriage. If it wasn't for that we might still all be driving along behind a man with a red flag. And thank god we didn't believe the man who said that it was impossible for human beings to travel above 30 mph without suffocating.

My memory is not what it was but thanks for crediting the Isle of Man with these developments. I assume you do mean the Isle of Man when you say " remember you're living in a country "

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Lots of moral, philosophical and eithical problems arise from the introduction of new tecnologies, but in general automation replaces jobs that weren't veryy much fun in the first place. Car factories now use robots to build cars, and the benefit is that modern cars are much better made than old ones were. The downside is all those jobs that were lost. However you could argue that people who were once sweating their cobs off fitting heater boxes to Vauxhall cavaliers at Luton are now working in much more amenable surroundings selling pot plants and DIY gear or coffee and cake etc, If Starbucks and Homebase have replaced the production line, the quality of life has risen all round.

 

Saving people from dying in car accidents does not of course prevent them from dying of other things later on. However the point is that all those lives can be saved. The WHO regards auto accident fatalities as a major epidemic. If they get cancer soon afterwards then that's not really the issue.

 

Amazingly all the sensors on cars seem to work well in the case of everyday road grime. Maybe that's because they've been designed that way. Car makers may possibly have thought all this through. Autonomous-mode cars do not rely on a single sensor or type of sensor per function, they have multiple sensors and computers which combine the information to provide decisions. Thus they assess traffic on the basis of several radars, several infra-reds, several normal camers, information from GPS and GSM and the internet.

 

They may not be perfect now but they will be foolproof and failsafe in the future.

 

Remember you're living in a country that was the first to be unafraid of that bnew-fangled invention, the horseless carriage. If it wasn't for that we might still all be driving along behind a man with a red flag. And thank god we didn't believe the man who said that it was impossible for human beings to travel above 30 mph without suffocating.

My memory is not what it was but thanks for crediting the Isle of Man with these developments. I assume you do mean the Isle of Man when you say " remember you're living in a country "

People on here keep reminding me this is an independent nation. If you don't like it, there's always a boat in the morning, apparently...

 

And if the IoM Govt hadn't done what the UK refused to do and made road racing legal, where would we be now? What sort of capital could we claim to be? So don't let's be afraid of a bit of new technology now.

 

And I don't believe in all the job losses. Driverless cars will still have humans on board. Buses and lorries ditto, except there will be fewer opportunities for foreign drivers to fall asleep or text their families while driving over the car in front at 80mph. This can only be a good thing.

 

I can see a case for completely driverless shuttle buses an airports and the like, and if the ill-mannered louts at Gatwick are anything to go by then this too represents a major step forward.

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