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Why Are There No Photo Identity Checks ?


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Where did I suggest "final destination?"

 

It's not so long ago, when the UK still had border controls, that an Island business was being used as a means of getting into the UK via the back door.

 

It is common knowledge that terrorist organisations from Ireland, North and South, sometimes travelled via the Island and indeed banked here.

 

How could the same authorities that took sensible precautions against Foot and Mouth getting in here not take sensible precautions (checking photo ID) to try to prevent terrorists and criminals getting in?

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For years post 1974 we had to fill in landing or embarkation cards under Prevention of Terrorism legislation. I'm not sure how they were checked or indexed. Im not sure that they were.   My question

I agree. The people at the Sea Terminal in Liverpool or Heysham should ask to see photographic ID and look people up on a criminal database. It seems people can just come and go.   Barrie, you menti

I have never been asked to prove my identity when travelling on the boat to the Island.   Would it be a good idea to know exactly who is entering the country ?

You're suggesting some sort of passport control check at the airport and boat for everybody arriving on the Island? That will need permanent staff and to be effective it'd need technology to check against people's criminal records quickly.

 

And you're comparing that to walking through a temporary disinfectant pad.

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For years post 1974 we had to fill in landing or embarkation cards under Prevention of Terrorism legislation. I'm not sure how they were checked or indexed. Im not sure that they were.

 

My question is simple, what right does, or should, the state have to know who I am, where I am going or why?

 

It starts to sound Stasi like. Everyone spying on everyone.

 

We need to be careful balancing essential freedoms against protection from alleged or perceived risk of harm.

 

Today is holocaust Memorial Day. We should carefully remember the misuse to which state held information about ethnicity, faith, political allegiance, sexuality, and mental and physical ability was put to.

 

We haven't learned. There have been many instances of holocausts, genocides, demonisations and persecutions since 1945. We fall to easily and readily into scapegoat ism where we are led by politicians

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I do think that the state has a duty of care which should include adequate monitoring at point of entry to the country in order to prevent access for known criminals, terrorists, offenders and suspects. The authorities do their best to prevent such people travelling to or from the Island by air, so why shouldn't ferry passengers be treated equally?

 

Letting such elements loose in the country has the potential to create infinitely more damage or loss of life than letting them board an aircraft would.

 

I am certainly not advocating a 1984 society, but why neglect such simple security measures when being surrounded by sea would make it so much simpler to apply them?

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Fossil. It's just the airlines. They all keep passenger lists for internal flights, but one of them require you to pre disclose or record your Id document on line or keep copies when they briefly scan it. They, that is the airlines, have no access to information as whether the person travelling is terrorist, convicted criminal, offender or suspect.

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It wouldn't actually cost more money, or take any more time, to make sure everyone who gets on the boat shows their passport. You tell them your reference number at check in and show your ID at the same time. Simples. It doesn't have to be linked to any fancy, technologically advanced computer system. It just means everyone who they have on their passenger log is who they say they are. Police could ask to cross reference any known names that may be of interest to their inquiries, without it being a 1984 police state bit of legislation. If the same known names keep cropping up to and from Liverpool at the same time as a spate of burglaries, then it might be prudent to have a word.

Of course you then have to balance out the likelihood that if the police have access then the state would quite like that information too. Not sure why, but in this day and age of increased need for cash I'm sure they'd work out a way of using that info to make sure their perks and pensions are getting paid. It's what governments do. Consume more and more till they bust the economy.

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You're advocating the equivalent of people being asked for ID on the start of their journey from town to town in their own country/travel area.

 

You mean like if someone travels from the Isle of Man to London by air. Or Liverpool. Or Manchester. It already happens, it's here now. The only difference is the mode of transport. As many quite happily point out, we're not the same country as them across so, in theory, should have a check and balance on who/what comes in or out.

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IDs are checked on planes because people have a demonstrable habit of blowing up flimsy aircraft.

 

It's the airlines which set the domestic ID policy which is also about ensuring that people travel on their own ticket - and about checking that banned (by the company) passengers do not board - eg drunks, scammers etc

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IDs are checked on planes because people have a demonstrable habit of blowing up flimsy aircraft.

It's the airlines which set the domestic ID policy which is also about ensuring that people travel on their own ticket - and about checking that banned (by the company) passengers do not board - eg drunks, scammers etc

But it's not consistent though. You can fly to London city and back without any form of ID on BA.

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I do think that the state has a duty of care which should include adequate monitoring at point of entry to the country in order to prevent access for known criminals, terrorists, offenders and suspects. The authorities do their best to prevent such people travelling to or from the Island by air, so why shouldn't ferry passengers be treated equally?

 

Letting such elements loose in the country has the potential to create infinitely more damage or loss of life than letting them board an aircraft would.

 

I am certainly not advocating a 1984 society, but why neglect such simple security measures when being surrounded by sea would make it so much simpler to apply them?

What do you mean "known criminals, terrorists, offenders and suspects"? Have you ever heard of rehabilitation or being innocent until proven guilty?

A massive majority of people who travel to & from the Island are not guilty of anything, known criminals (who have served punishment) and suspects are not guilty of anything - John Wright is right - it has nothing to do with the state who they are or where they are going.

As for terrorists, not subsidising UK foreign policy as we do would be a much more effective & cheaper way of keeping them out.

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