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Looking for advice on underfloor heating


tigermoth
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Hi all,

 

First time poster here. Please let me know (gently!) if I'm doing this wrong in any way.

 

We're in the process of buying a house. We're planning on tearing up all the carpets and putting down tile flooring on the ground floor and bamboo flooring on the first floor. Since we're going to that effort, we figure we may as well also install underfloor heating. We've got an oil boiler (Camray Utility Systems Boiler (20/32kw) and a CL210 solar

megaflo) and we're going to be replacing all the single-pane windows (there aren't many) with double glazing before we move in, plus putting some extra insulation into the loft.

 

We can only find Cu-plas as a supplier, and they've likely got a list of plumbers who have done this for them before.

Does anyone in here have any experience doing a similar project? Does anything I mention raise any red flags? Any suppliers, plumbers, etc. I should consider working with, or any I should avoid?

 

We're complete DIY-novices, and we've never done this sort of thing before, so any advice at all would be really appreciated.

 

Thank you!

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I toyed with the idea of underfloor heating when we changed the bathroom, the thing that stopped me was the worry that if something went wrong...a whole world of hassle and ofc, the expense. I spent all my pocket money on tiles (and some of next years pocket money too...) so I want them to be there for my life time. The bathroom is nice, you don't notice the cold when you've slippers on.

 

I love Cu-plas, they'd probably recommend a good plumber, they put us onto Juan Leece regards our wet room, guess he might know about heating too? I've no idea what his plumbing (we didn't need any doing) is like but he's a really nice man. :)

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Underfloor is good in concrete floors. Really good. I put my own in during a barn conversion which was easy. It will not be so easy in a renovation project. You need at least 75mm of insulation under the heating pipes (100mm is better) plus another 75mm of screed on top of that so be prepared to do a lot of work if you have concrete floors that need taking up and then digging out to get the same finished floor level.

 

No idea what it's like on timber suspended floors but not as good I imagine.

Edited by ballaughbiker
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I disagree with cambon it is highly efficient if done properly and very reliable. It also works very well with solar sources.

 

However if you are putting it into a renovation project which you are living in it is a very labour intensive process if you have solid floors making it expensive. It is not something to do in a house that you plan to live in short-term. That said, whether you are putting in underfloor or not, insulate x3

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ID do underfloor stuff, but I think they have not a cheaper option but a good one, I also think they'll want to fit it. Nu-heat do kits and the design work and although off island they are happy to ship here. a friend of a friend fitted their stuff and did both the under concrete screed stuff downstairs and the between joists under wooden floor upstairs. the flooring they used upstairs was engineered oak tongue and groove flooring for stability, not the cheapest option either, but you need a flooring that atleast tries to let heat through, and they kept bare wood floors. carpet would add even more insulation but you can get special underlays I think to help here. but it is a time consuming task to fit. much quicker and possibly cheaper to just use copper pipe and radiators and you end up with something to hang wet clothes on.

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much quicker and possibly cheaper to just use copper pipe and radiators and you end up with something to hang wet clothes on.

 

The worst thing to do is hang wet clothes to dry near a radiator,or indoors,for that matter.

 

All it does is raise the humidity level,make the house colder,increase airborne mould spores and leave black mould spots on cold walls.

 

I can never understand how people don't grasp that heat used from a radiator to dry clothes isn't a free by product of having the radiators hot,you then require the boiler to be on longer to compensate in maintaining the heat levels.

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as mentioned you need a good 6-12" below floor to install it, if floor is a concrete screed then you could be close to damp proofing membrane too and the whole job would be incredibly messy.

 

what type of age and building style is the property ?

 

old cottage - nope probably no DPC and stone floors

town house - suspended wood floor so could be fitted (hard work)

new build - either suspended chip board or concrete floor

bungalow - often suspended chip board or wood

 

airbrick positioning outside give you an idea, airbrick below floor level implies a suspended floor

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A job that's keeping me out of the pub at the moment:

 

The FFL is the yellow line on the far wall and because the ground was so shite, there's 400mm roadstone under this membrane. Due to a tenant living upstairs, 12t had to be dug out by hand and barrowed/ skipped away. Hopefully the brick gives an idea of scale but this is what depth's required for 100mm kingspan insulation under the pipes.

 

Img_0172_zpsn32cerne.jpg

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much quicker and possibly cheaper to just use copper pipe and radiators and you end up with something to hang wet clothes on.

 

The worst thing to do is hang wet clothes to dry near a radiator,or indoors,for that matter.

 

All it does is raise the humidity level,make the house colder,increase airborne mould spores and leave black mould spots on cold walls.

 

I can never understand how people don't grasp that heat used from a radiator to dry clothes isn't a free by product of having the radiators hot,you then require the boiler to be on longer to compensate in maintaining the heat levels.

Not wrong, but hot towel rails do it in bathrooms without much issue because they are vented these days. I'm not saying put sopping clothes from the washing machine all over the place but it is handy to flop the kids gloves ,hats and coats on if they get wet in the rain. It isn't so much about maximum efficiency keeping a house warm, it is about utilising a resource. The same water content gets airborne whether the coats take days to air dry naturally or are helped with radiators.

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Modern spins on washing machines get most of the water out these days, provided it's not overloaded for the cycle.

 

Mine just comes out the of a spin, goes on hangers and left in the mud room 'till ironing (but fleces and t-shirts are ready to wear half hour after a wash). No messing about with radiators and open windows. Modern domestics have come a long way since a mangle or twin tub.

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Before I bought my last washing machine, I read up online about spin speeds and drying. The speed that was most efficient when weighing up the amount of power consumed versus drying was 1200 rpm. Anything above that used more electricity that it was worth. It also puts excessive wear on the drum bearings, shortening the life of the machine. The general advice was to stick with a quality machine, and only use spin speeds up to 1200, which I now do.

 

The previous two machines both died due to knackered bearings. The first was an Indesit Moon. It actually lasted ok (6 years), due to normal spin speeds, it just got overloaded (6kg max). The second was an 8kg Hotpoint with a 1400rpm spin. It was a midrange machine, bit it lasted only two year.

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Thank you, everyone.

 

It's a detached house from the 1950s. The guys at Cu-plas seem to think that the underfloor will be concrete in a house like this. We've asked the current owners, but they don't know.

 

When we find out what kind of flooring it is for sure, what's the worst kind for this?

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