Jump to content

Car Leasing


robby14
 Share

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Max Power said:

To be honest, I wouldn't like the thought of an electric car on charge under my apartment. When they catch fire, they are impossible to extinguish, the batteries generate their own oxygen.

Especially as that place has form for "unexplained" conflagrations

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, NoTail said:

I hope to buy an electric car in the next year or two. Was wondering has anyone here tried to do the sums as to pence per mile compared to petrol or diesel? 

I read somewhere that it works out at around 2-3 pence per mile on electric against 30-40 pence per mile for petrol or diesel, not sure how much MUA pricing structure would skew that!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, finlo said:

I read somewhere that it works out at around 2-3 pence per mile on electric against 30-40 pence per mile for petrol or diesel, not sure how much MUA pricing structure would skew that!

From my research  it seems to be correct.Also the home electric  bill would  get cheaper as you end up on a lower tariff ( at off peak hours) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/18/2019 at 10:03 AM, mad_manx said:

From my research  it seems to be correct.Also the home electric  bill would  get cheaper as you end up on a lower tariff ( at off peak hours) 

But the lower tariff is only applicable if you meet a set KWH target, as I recall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/20/2019 at 11:08 AM, Andy Onchan said:

But the lower tariff is only applicable if you meet a set KWH target, as I recall.

They  say that they will monitor for fair use to see if there is any sudden spike in usage at night  after you are given lower rates .

 

I know many with EV but I have not heard of anyone having issues with this.  They all run their washer dryers at off peak hours ;-)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/17/2019 at 9:25 PM, NoTail said:

I hope to buy an electric car in the next year or two. Was wondering has anyone here tried to do the sums as to pence per mile compared to petrol or diesel? 

pence per mile based on 'fuel' only is the last bit of the story and the only bit that makes .  when you factor in the initial extra cost over a similar spec petrol or diesel car,  renting the batteries  ( renault )  or having to replace them in a few years  it just isn't worth the outlay yet.  the extra cost of the vehicle alone is an awful lot of fuel money to put into a car doing 50+ mpg  that performs just as well in the wet , cold and dark with the wipers, heater and lights on  unlike your battery version.  and don't forget that when electric does become mainstream, eventually,  government will tax the fuck out of it to replace the lost fuel duty income and internal combustion engine road vehicle licence fees.

Edited by WTF
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, WTF said:

pence per mile based on 'fuel' only is the last bit of the story and the only bit that makes .  when you factor in the initial extra cost over a similar spec petrol or diesel car,  renting the batteries  ( renault )  or having to replace them in a few years  it just isn't worth the outlay yet.  the extra cost of the vehicle alone is an awful lot of fuel money to put into a car doing 50+ mpg  that performs just as well in the wet , cold and dark with the wipers, heater and lights on  unlike your battery version.  and don't forget that when electric does become mainstream, eventually,  government will tax the fuck out of it to replace the lost fuel duty income and internal combustion engine road vehicle licence fees.

Agree. But it depends on usage and how much you were spending on a petrol car into the first place. Our commuting distances are low which is ideal for a  EV. 

 

It is a myth that you have to replace batteries in EV's every few years. With usage the range decreases  slowly with time .

Most manufacturers are confident enough to guarantee  the battery till 100k miles. 

Remember that there is no BIK on an electric car in the first place if its through a limited company.

Just like fossil fuel car its always more cost effective to lease .

Edited by mad_manx
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

A bit of an old thread revival, but, how do the self-charging (Toyota/Lexus etc.) hybrids fare over here? I see a few around, but it'd be good to know what economy is like on our roads.

In theory, it seems like the Island's roads would be well suited to that sort of energy capture, they seem to do very well in city traffic, well on country roads and middling on motorways.

PHEVs and electrics don't really fit what I need. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

A bit of an old thread revival, but, how do the self-charging (Toyota/Lexus etc.) hybrids fare over here? I see a few around, but it'd be good to know what economy is like on our roads.

In theory, it seems like the Island's roads would be well suited to that sort of energy capture, they seem to do very well in city traffic, well on country roads and middling on motorways.

PHEVs and electrics don't really fit what I need. 

These self charging cars are a bit of a con, they say they charge up on braking and going down hill, but this provides only a tiny amount of charge, most of the charge will come from a generator connected to the petrol engine. There are signs that Toyota and most other manufacturers are moving away from these.

I have a fully electric car and the display can show energy recovered from going down hill or slowing down, on a trip Douglas to Ramsey over the mountain, what you might gain going down from the mountain is used several times over going up hill in the first place.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, Katman said:

These self charging cars are a bit of a con, they say they charge up on braking and going down hill, but this provides only a tiny amount of charge, most of the charge will come from a generator connected to the petrol engine. There are signs that Toyota and most other manufacturers are moving away from these.

I have a fully electric car and the display can show energy recovered from going down hill or slowing down, on a trip Douglas to Ramsey over the mountain, what you might gain going down from the mountain is used several times over going up hill in the first place.

I have a self charging  hybrid and while I wish I had a full EV like you I couldn't afford one at the time. The biggest issue in the IOM is that the driving distances are often short and are better suited for full electric cars rather than hybrids. The electric motor on a hybrid is quite tiny ( and so is the battery) that it can only power the cars for a few miles at the best and that too on a flat surface. If any more power is needed the petrol engine kicks in..

For someone driving  around 30 or 40 miles a day It's probably worth it but I suspect  that most of us do far less  than that.  The only time I get to see my cars efficiency is when I take it to the UK and that's not happened for the last 2 years :-(

Edited by mad_manx
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, Katman said:

These self charging cars are a bit of a con, they say they charge up on braking and going down hill, but this provides only a tiny amount of charge, most of the charge will come from a generator connected to the petrol engine. There are signs that Toyota and most other manufacturers are moving away from these.

I have a fully electric car and the display can show energy recovered from going down hill or slowing down, on a trip Douglas to Ramsey over the mountain, what you might gain going down from the mountain is used several times over going up hill in the first place.

Apparently you can charge up a Tesla by towing it behind another car!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, mad_manx said:

I have a self charging  hybrid and while I wish I had a full EV like you I couldn't afford one at the time. The biggest issue in the IOM is that the driving distances are often short and are better suited for full electric cars rather than hybrids.

We bought a second hand Leaf a few years ago. It's the car we use most, love it for on Island use. Wish we'd had it when we both worked for commuting each day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Katman said:

These self charging cars are a bit of a con, they say they charge up on braking and going down hill, but this provides only a tiny amount of charge, most of the charge will come from a generator connected to the petrol engine. There are signs that Toyota and most other manufacturers are moving away from these.

My understanding is that essentially, Toyota built the hybrid to give diesel levels of efficiency from a petrol engine, by having the motor take up the slack when the engine wouldn't be running as efficiently, rather than replacing the petrol motor.

The bit that really appeals is the fact they're rock solid reliability wise, and they appear to hold their value well, with minimal servicing costs. No cambelts, alternator, starter etc. Taxi drivers seem to absolutely love the drivetrains.

Diesel feels like a bit of a gamble now, and DPFs don't mix with the island.

1 hour ago, mad_manx said:

For someone driving  around 30 or 40 miles a day It's probably worth it but I suspect  that most of us do far less  than that.  The only time I get to see my cars efficiency is when I take it to the UK and that's not happened for the last 2 years 😞

I'd be doing over that I think. If I'd be going for enough a 24/30kwh Leaf,  it would likely get a bit bum twitchy in winter with the range hit. I'd also be stuck public charging, so a car doing 50-60 mpg would end up being the same cost wise, but more convenient. How do you find your hybrid when it is on a long run?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

My understanding is that essentially, Toyota built the hybrid to give diesel levels of efficiency from a petrol engine, by having the motor take up the slack when the engine wouldn't be running as efficiently, rather than replacing the petrol motor.

The bit that really appeals is the fact they're rock solid reliability wise, and they appear to hold their value well, with minimal servicing costs. No cambelts, alternator, starter etc. Taxi drivers seem to absolutely love the drivetrains.

Diesel feels like a bit of a gamble now, and DPFs don't mix with the island.

I'd be doing over that I think. If I'd be going for enough a 24/30kwh Leaf,  it would likely get a bit bum twitchy in winter with the range hit. I'd also be stuck public charging, so a car doing 50-60 mpg would end up being the same cost wise, but more convenient. How do you find your hybrid when it is on a long run?

Long runs are great..But only happens when I am in the UK.. i think on the island the maximum I've driven in a day is around 60 miles or so and even that is very rare. On an average work day  I do under 10 miles as home/ work etc are all fairly close .

Edited by mad_manx
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, mad_manx said:

Long runs are great..But only happens when I am in the UK.. i think on the island the maximum I've driven in a day is around 60 miles or so and even that is very rare. On an average work day  I do under 10 miles as home/ work etc are all fairly close .

if you're that close to work why not walk ?

Edited by WTF
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...