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What are people's thoughts on sustenance along the lines of Soylent?

http://www.soylent.me/

 

In theory, it's a reasonable way of keeping yourself going if you have a hectic schedule. I mean, price-wise it's not bad either given the convenience.

The one I'm trying is a UK recipe known as Liquid Cake http://diy.soylent.me/recipes/liquid-cake-v13-2

Admittedly, the one I'm going to try is geared towards weight loss. But it all arrives on Tuesday so I'll let you know how it goes.

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What are people's thoughts on sustenance along the lines of Soylent?

http://www.soylent.me/

 

In theory, it's a reasonable way of keeping yourself going if you have a hectic schedule. I mean, price-wise it's not bad either given the convenience.

The one I'm trying is a UK recipe known as Liquid Cake http://diy.soylent.me/recipes/liquid-cake-v13-2

Admittedly, the one I'm going to try is geared towards weight loss. But it all arrives on Tuesday so I'll let you know how it goes.

I think Soylent ignores the most important aspect of eating for those of us lucky enough to have a plentiful supply of food: pleasure.

 

I don't eat simply to survive, I like eating, I like cooking and I derive pleasure from food and eating with company.

 

If I just wanted calories, I'd neck slim fast.

 

I don't buy the 'too busy to cook' thing either. It takes minutes to prepare an omellette or a plate of noodles, this is just some silly sci-fi fantasy.

 

Cost? £3 quid a meal for goop isn't that cheap. I can buy a chicken for 4 quid, some spuds and peas for another 2 qiod and feed four well.

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I'm with Slim on this one. I enjoy eating - in fact there's a delicious lasagne about half way cooked in the oven right now that I'm looking forwards to.

 

By all means make modifications to your diet to save money, lose weight, save time etc. But they're all possible to a certain extent without going down the "get your protein pills and put your helmet on" David Bowie/Major Tom thing.

 

If you want to lose weight, cut carbs.

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What are people's thoughts on sustenance along the lines of Soylent?

http://www.soylent.me/

 

In theory, it's a reasonable way of keeping yourself going if you have a hectic schedule. I mean, price-wise it's not bad either given the convenience.

The one I'm trying is a UK recipe known as Liquid Cake http://diy.soylent.me/recipes/liquid-cake-v13-2

Admittedly, the one I'm going to try is geared towards weight loss. But it all arrives on Tuesday so I'll let you know how it goes.

I think Soylent ignores the most important aspect of eating for those of us lucky enough to have a plentiful supply of food: pleasure.

 

I don't eat simply to survive, I like eating, I like cooking and I derive pleasure from food and eating with company.

 

If I just wanted calories, I'd neck slim fast.

 

I don't buy the 'too busy to cook' thing either. It takes minutes to prepare an omellette or a plate of noodles, this is just some silly sci-fi fantasy.

 

Cost? £3 quid a meal for goop isn't that cheap. I can buy a chicken for 4 quid, some spuds and peas for another 2 qiod and feed four well.

 

I can see where you are coming from, and if I was living at home, or not in halls, I'd be much less inclined to do it. But as it stands, the social aspect of food always tends to be in Greggs or Subway, or maybe the local Indian takeaway, it's just part of student life here.

I appreciate it's definitely not for everyone, but I know I'm not getting anything near reasonable nutrition on my current diet. Fruit & Veg are often ignored because they go off, and I forget to eat them. I don't eat meals at consistent times either due to practicalities. Fast food is pretty much king. Ramen noodles packed full of salt are no better.

I've got two weeks worth arriving on Tuesday, so I'll see how I fare on that, and I'll be able to decide whether it's practical for me or not.

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I can see where you are coming from, and if I was living at home, or not in halls, I'd be much less inclined to do it.

Maybe you should move out of "halls" and into a shared house with friends - where, together, you can enjoy normal communal cooking and eating. That's an important part of the social experience of being at University. Learn to make fantastic food using fresh ingredients, which are cheap, and you will be everyone's favourite person. And not that bloke who lives on formula smile.png

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/soylent-how-i-stopped-eating-for-30-days

 

It was my second day on Soylent and my stomach felt like a coil of knotty old rope, slowly tightening. I wasn’t hungry, but something was off. I was tired, light-headed, low-energy, but my heart was racing ...

 

... It tasted like granular baby formula that was somehow simultaneously sugary and salty. Previous tasters had compared it to semen ... “Be careful,” my girlfriend Corrina said ... “You don’t really know if it’s safe,” ... “It’s also just kind of a dumb idea.”

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The one I'm trying is a UK recipe known as Liquid Cake http://diy.soylent.me/recipes/liquid-cake-v13-2

The ingredients for that say that it contains 24g of Psyllium Husk Powder per day. Psyllium husk is also known as Ispaghula - it is often prescribed (eg Fybogel) as short term fibre supplement for people with medical issues. 1 sachet of Fybogel contains 3.5g of husk.

 

So unless I am misunderstanding the ingredients you have linked to - your daily dose of Psyllium is going to be equivalent to almost 7 sachets of Fybogel. Typical dose would be 2 sachets per day.

 

This ingredient swells up inside you to basically produce artificial bulk which passes easily through the digestive system. So I think you can expect to feel very bloated. And ... well I am sure I don't need to explain the other likely consequence.

 

(There is some doubt concerning early testing into possible side effects connected to Ispaghula.)

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I can see where you are coming from, and if I was living at home, or not in halls, I'd be much less inclined to do it.

Maybe you should move out of "halls" and into a shared house with friends - where, together, you can enjoy normal communal cooking and eating. That's an important part of the social experience of being at University. Learn to make fantastic food using fresh ingredients, which are cheap, and you will be everyone's favourite person. And not that bloke who lives on formula smile.png

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/soylent-how-i-stopped-eating-for-30-days

 

It was my second day on Soylent and my stomach felt like a coil of knotty old rope, slowly tightening. I wasn’t hungry, but something was off. I was tired, light-headed, low-energy, but my heart was racing ...

 

... It tasted like granular baby formula that was somehow simultaneously sugary and salty. Previous tasters had compared it to semen ... “Be careful,” my girlfriend Corrina said ... “You don’t really know if it’s safe,” ... “It’s also just kind of a dumb idea.”

 

I'm moving out of halls and in with good friends of mine, but not until the next academic year. Sadly, the 3 I currently share with, one I don't know, and the other two are in vastly different social circles to my own. We talk in the kitchen briefly and that's it. It's not much different to the Cambridge diet or other food replacements really.

 

Re: the Psyllium, remember, if the Soylent is the sole source of food, the fibre has to come from somewhere. I plan to check my health, and stop if I start feeling really unwell.

The low-energy second day on Soylent, the author writes that it was due to lack of water intake and after a couple of glasses of water, it was fine.

 

I didn't necessarily come on here to debate it, it's not for everyone, but I was more intrigued as to whether anyone else had any experience with it.

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I'd certainly be interested to hear your experience. I wouldn't worry about the fibre, I've been overweight and have added bulking to food to help the feeling of fullness, and it didn't do me any harm. You have to make sure you get the liquid mix right is all.

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We all divide up unto two groups with food. Fuel or pleasure. I'm in the fuel camp but I'd not eat that goop. You can cook some chicken and rice in minutes, or even throw bought cooked chicken into a packet of uncle bens microwave rice in seconds for a perfectly filling meal. Watch the amount of dextrose in pre cooked packaged chicken though.

 

I eat the same thing for lunch every day (plain chicken and raw spinach), I don't see how this goop is any easier.

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Before i broke my leg, i had gotten into the habit of making a casserole of sorts, i find that by doing so i can put a few things in there that are good for me but that i don't really like, and i will still eat them mixed into the casserole.

 

Also because i was keeping funny hours due to a lot of training, and wasn't in the mood/was too tired to cook when i got in i started to just make one huge casserole on Sunday and portion it out into Tupperware and freeze a weeks worth of evening meals.

 

This was really efficient both in cost and time management, it was the healthiest meal in my diet, and it tasted really good too. I would recommend a similar practice to anyone who wants to eat healthily and cheaply. A friend who works an intense physically demanding job does something similar, knowing that he would be too tired to cook when he gets home from work, and tired of putting on weight from excessive take out food life style, he prepares his evening meal in a slow cooker before going to work in the morning and it's done when he gets in through the door.

 

A little bit of thought and experimenting with your timetable and lifestyle can help you avoid taking such drastic measures, and dubious sounding quick fixes as the product in the OP.

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In theory, it's a reasonable way of keeping yourself going if you have a hectic schedule.

 

A hectic schedule? Too busy to cook food? Give me a break. Unless you're the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff or secretary general of the UN, your best bet is to go buy a packed lunch box like normal people FFS.

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