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Brief overview:-

 

Me and my friend are travelling in Australia at the moment, spreading the good will and natural friendliness of the Manx people on a global scale. Naturally, as young unstructured folk who can't save, we unfortunately have had personal loans in the past which on occasion we transfer funds back to UK to cover payments.

 

Anyhow, to the point in hand. Today, my friend receives an unsavoury call from his sister back on the IOM informing him that a 'Bailiff' (her words not mine) had turned up at her residence seeking overdue payment of his loan. Bemused as we are, I contact the bank on behalf of my brosef and found out the funds he had transferred back to the IOM had not cleared in time for the DD to be taken. Bear in mind, he has never missed a payment before.

 

I even had the pleasure of speaking to the gentleman in question, who advised me that he was a 'debt recovery manager' NOT a bailiff and just happened to be in the area.

 

Can anyone advise if this is standard procedure for any company/bank/entity to send to someone round to a persons place of residence 24 hours after a missed payment because IMO this comes across highly unprofessional and judging by the sisters reaction to the whole ordeal probably a bit heavy handed rather than a courtesy call.

 

Over and out

 

Portunus

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Defo not a bailiff as we don't have them. The creditor would have to go to Court first to obtain a judgment on the debt at which stage the creditor can have the judgment passed to the Coroner (the IOM

I doubt it. In my experience of chasing debtors a coroner won't do anything without a court judgment   And then they don't do anything.

Send in the clowns.

Defo not a bailiff as we don't have them. The creditor would have to go to Court first to obtain a judgment on the debt at which stage the creditor can have the judgment passed to the Coroner (the IOM equivalent of a bailiff). The coroner will then negotiate payment and if necessary seize assets and sell them to raise funds.

 

This will be some tosser the bank are using to try and avoid the legal costs of the proper process. Probably following a UK business model without appreciating the difference. Tell him to piss off and call the police if he returns.

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Tell your friend to stop being a pussy and make the call himself. Like any bank manager would be willing to discuss someone else's debt with a 3rd party.

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The creditor would have to go to Court first to obtain a judgment on the debt at which stage the creditor can have the judgment passed to the Coroner (the IOM equivalent of a bailiff). The coroner will then negotiate payment and if necessary seize assets and sell them to raise funds.

 

 

 

The coroner can and has without any warning whatsoever arrest property for auction including homes. No discussion. No negotiation.

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If someone in the bank could have done the obvious and either read his mind or consulted the crystal ball before sending someone round they'd have known it was simply a late transfer and nothing to worry about...

 

Oh yeah, those options are not quite real. Guess they'd probably try and make contact somehow. Oh, they have - and as a result the problem has quickly and easily been rectified. So, call the police first and the OFT first thing Monday. Be sure to tell them that nothing happened but you're quite angry about it.

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Not like you to be so sarcastic Dave. Whilst agreeing that it's the customer's responsibility to run their account properly this would seem a bit ott if taken on face value.

 

I've noticed a huge change in the attitude of many banks over the last couple of years and despite the advertising brainwashing you to think they care, the level of financial aggression has never been higher.

 

I was summoned to see some "young turk" (not the first description to mind and nothing to do with his nationality) at HSBC to prove I lived in the island. He treated me to somewhat hostile questioning telling me how it was going to be before finally agreeing I had done nothing wrong and the account, held without any incident for 8 years, could remain open. They still shut it a few weeks later and bounced my direct debit for the leccy, stopped internet access and stopped the debit card.

 

All this was about two months ago and I still can't access my money. Hey portunus, was it HSBC by any chance?

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The creditor would have to go to Court first to obtain a judgment on the debt at which stage the creditor can have the judgment passed to the Coroner (the IOM equivalent of a bailiff). The coroner will then negotiate payment and if necessary seize assets and sell them to raise funds.

 

 

The coroner can and has without any warning whatsoever arrest property for auction including homes. No discussion. No negotiation.

I doubt it. In my experience of chasing debtors a coroner won't do anything without a court judgment

 

And then they don't do anything.

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Brief overview:-

 

Me and my friend are travelling in Australia at the moment, spreading the good will and natural friendliness of the Manx people on a global scale. Naturally, as young unstructured folk who can't save, we unfortunately have had personal loans in the past which on occasion we transfer funds back to UK to cover payments.

 

Anyhow, to the point in hand. Today, my friend receives an unsavoury call from his sister back on the IOM informing him that a 'Bailiff' (her words not mine) had turned up at her residence seeking overdue payment of his loan. Bemused as we are, I contact the bank on behalf of my brosef and found out the funds he had transferred back to the IOM had not cleared in time for the DD to be taken. Bear in mind, he has never missed a payment before.

 

I even had the pleasure of speaking to the gentleman in question, who advised me that he was a 'debt recovery manager' NOT a bailiff and just happened to be in the area.

 

Can anyone advise if this is standard procedure for any company/bank/entity to send to someone round to a persons place of residence 24 hours after a missed payment because IMO this comes across highly unprofessional and judging by the sisters reaction to the whole ordeal probably a bit heavy handed rather than a courtesy call.

 

Over and out

 

Portunus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I find it odd that a debt collector is speaking to you about someone else's business. What happened to privacy or is something not quite what it seems?

 

Does a bad debt history stay against the name of the owner/tenant of a property used when the debt occurred?

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