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Illegal to film police?


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He was probably filming the police interacting with someone else and being loud, drunk, told to desist and go away. Refused and got arrested for drunk and disorderly.

 

He agreed to be bound over to keep the peace as an alternative to being prosecuted. He would have signed the binding over agreement to be of good behaviour and then the summons would be withdrawn. its not a punishment on conviction.

 

Filming the police in public, and not in a restricted area, such as airport security zone or maritime security zone is not an offence

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The way this incident has been reported sends out a misleading message to the public by suggesting that there is something illegal about filming the police, when we ought to be encouraging people to film them at work more often.

Take it up with the people who reported it that way

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Of course it's not illegal to film the police, this guy was arrested for Drunk and Disorderly so he would have been doing something else while filming the police maybe swearing at them etc.

 

However if you do film the police as they are dealing with something be prepared to possibly have your phone seized as it may contain potential evidence of the crime being committed.

Your wrong, the police have no right to seize property just because they believe it may be useful to them. In order to legally obtain it they would either have to arrest you for something or make a request to a judge who would turn it down in most circumstances.

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Surely filmimg police in public, while annoying, isn't actually illegal?

http://www.three.fm/news/isle-of-man-news/bind-over-order-for-man-caught-filming-police/

In another thread the police official advice seem's to be

 

"The taking of photographs of an individual without their consent is a CIVIL MATTER. Taking a photo of a person where they can expect privacy (inside their home or garden) is likely to be a breach of privacy laws. The other issue to consider is what you plan to do with the photograph afterwards. If the picture is of an individual, perhaps as a portrait or character study, and you intend to publish it in any way (on the internet, in a book or at a gallery), it would be appropriate and may avoid unnecessary complications if you ask that person for permission, many media organisations are international and will not accept an identifiable photograph of a person without a signed release. If the photo could be seen as defamatory in some way then you would leave yourself open to civil proceedings."

 

So maybe they should elect to sue them.

Edited by JackCarter
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Of course it's not illegal to film the police, this guy was arrested for Drunk and Disorderly so he would have been doing something else while filming the police maybe swearing at them etc.

 

However if you do film the police as they are dealing with something be prepared to possibly have your phone seized as it may contain potential evidence of the crime being committed.

Your wrong, the police have no right to seize property just because they believe it may be useful to them. In order to legally obtain it they would either have to arrest you for something or make a request to a judge who would turn it down in most circumstances.

 

 

No you're wrong.

 

Under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) of 1984, under section 19 subclause 3, "The constable may seize anything which is on the premises if he has reasonable grounds for believing that it is evidence in relation to an offence which he is investigating, and that it is necessary to seize it in order to prevent the evidence being concealed, lost, altered or destroyed." It is worth pointing out that "premises" in this context refers to "any place", as per PACE s23.

In theory, that means that police can seize any recording device if they believe it has been used to record a crime. Say, if you are out photographing a riot, and you take a photo at the exact moment somebody is throwing a petrol bomb, and a police officer spots you, believing that you are the only person who has a record of the crime taking place, for example.

In practice, this means that UK police can seize your whole recording device, whether that is a mobile phone, a camera, or anything else that can be used to record data.

 

http://www.photocritic.org/articles/police-in-england-can-seize-your-camera-as-evidence

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Of course it's not illegal to film the police, this guy was arrested for Drunk and Disorderly so he would have been doing something else while filming the police maybe swearing at them etc.

 

However if you do film the police as they are dealing with something be prepared to possibly have your phone seized as it may contain potential evidence of the crime being committed.

 

Your wrong, the police have no right to seize property just because they believe it may be useful to them. In order to legally obtain it they would either have to arrest you for something or make a request to a judge who would turn it down in most circumstances.

No you're wrong.

 

 

Under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) of 1984, under section 19 subclause 3, "The constable may seize anything which is on the premises if he has reasonable grounds for believing that it is evidence in relation to an offence which he is investigating, and that it is necessary to seize it in order to prevent the evidence being concealed, lost, altered or destroyed." It is worth pointing out that "premises" in this context refers to "any place", as per PACE s23.

In theory, that means that police can seize any recording device if they believe it has been used to record a crime. Say, if you are out photographing a riot, and you take a photo at the exact moment somebody is throwing a petrol bomb, and a police officer spots you, believing that you are the only person who has a record of the crime taking place, for example.

In practice, this means that UK police can seize your whole recording device, whether that is a mobile phone, a camera, or anything else that can be used to record data.

http://www.photocritic.org/articles/police-in-england-can-seize-your-camera-as-evidence

Concealed,lost,altered or destroyed? They are more likely to seize something to make sure those 4 are carried out and the video never seen. Maybe upload live to the cloud as a back up? How do the police get round copyright laws?

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Of course it's not illegal to film the police, this guy was arrested for Drunk and Disorderly so he would have been doing something else while filming the police maybe swearing at them etc.

 

However if you do film the police as they are dealing with something be prepared to possibly have your phone seized as it may contain potential evidence of the crime being committed.

Your wrong, the police have no right to seize property just because they believe it may be useful to them. In order to legally obtain it they would either have to arrest you for something or make a request to a judge who would turn it down in most circumstances.

no you're wrong

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