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Coroner reiterates call for speed limit....


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Some years ago, the issue of a national speed limit was a big political topic, and if I remember rightly, there was a vote/consultaion on it. I remember at the time being against it. I remember thinki

As a long standing TT & MGP visitor I would have no issue at all with the introduction of a speed limit. Hopefully it would discourage the fantasists from coming and in turn the one-way system co

I suspect the reality is that the percentage of bikers that do come to the Island to speed over TT is very tiny. Even those who do misbehave, probably get carried away by the possibility of doing so,

Probably wreck less driving or driving without due care and attention.

 

The other factor now is the pure speed of the bikes. The advancement in technology is staggering on bikes. You can get yourself 200 bhp plus bike for about 16k. Scary stuff really.

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Growing up, and learning to drive on the IOM, we were aware that the lack of speed limits just meant the cops would get you on the much more vague "without due care".

 

Unfortunately, "without due care and attention" is conveniently forgotten about for TT related purpo$e$.

 

So many contributors on here defended the 100mph+ guy who died up near Dhoon.

 

"Without due care" basically means the riders involved don't care about their own life or of anyone else's.

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Unfortunately, while all those who assert the need for due care, riding or driving within the ability to stop etc. are absolutely right, detecting failures there usually happens after the event.

 

A road where your ordinary, every day road users driving or riding at normal, everyday speeds share the carriageway with users riding at 150 mph plus, very often well past the limits of their abilities, is a sure fire recipe for horrendous accidents. The government must surely listen to the coroner at this second time of asking or be culpable and negligent in protecting the lives of Manx residents and visitors.

 

A speed limit is easily enforced with speed cameras.

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To be fair the guy who died at the dhoon (which I assume was actually at Bulgham rocks) dies because someone did a 3 point turn in front of him.

No. He died because he was riding his motorbike too fast.

 

But it does highlight my point, while the island has the attitude that Autobahn speeds on B roads are acceptable, there will always be deaths.

 

Speeds limits + speed cameras + police with backbones = a few lives saved.

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I'm sorry but the person who did the three point turn was prosecuted weren't they?

 

The majority of the blame lies with the driver of the car. How fucking idiotic do you have to be to do a three point turn in the middle of a main road.

 

Like doing one at the fairy bridge. Idiotic

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How fucking idiotic do you have to be to do a three point turn in the middle of a main road.

 

Like doing one at the fairy bridge. Idiotic

 

If you forgot to say hello to the fairies when you passed, a three point turn is your only option or are you suggesting that people reverse back?

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I'm sorry but the person who did the three point turn was prosecuted weren't they?

 

The majority of the blame lies with the driver of the car. How fucking idiotic do you have to be to do a three point turn in the middle of a main road.

 

Like doing one at the fairy bridge. Idiotic

There's nothing wrong with doing a three-point-turn at the fairy bridge.

 

That is why they teach (and test) you how to do three-point-turns. So you can go back the way you came.

 

And yes they were prosecuted. But would not have been in any other English speaking country. Which is kind of where Needham is coming from. Our road laws are shite.

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We've been over this at length. It was yet another sad tragedy for all involved that should never have happened. The driver was prosecuted, but a visitor to the Island couldn't reasonably be expected to anticipate a bike coming upon them at 100mph+ on a quiet country 'B' road on the Isle of Man. It's not like they were doing a three point turn on a motorway or busy dual carriageway. They shouldn't have done it but who hasn't once done a quick three point turn where they think the road is quiet ? I'll be the first to put my hand up. It's our stupid and negligent road laws that provide the context and opportunity for high speeds on unrestricted roads that were never designed for high speed motoring.

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just the small detail of being next to a bend in the road

I still find it amazing than no-one knows the highway code (including the judiciary).

 

You have to go round bends, blind corners or around obstacles at a speed that allows you to cope with whatever you find on the other side.

 

If someone quickly builds a brick wall across the Fairy Bridge and you round that bend too fast to stop, it's your fault. Not the brickie.

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I have been in the situation when a vehicle, parked on the side of the road indicated to pull away from the curb.

 

I was within 20feet of the rear of the vehicle and assumed , wrongly , that the vehicle was intending to pull away and went to ,in my view safely, overtake.

 

The driver then immediately executed a U turn and I ,fortunately, managed to stop with perhaps an inch to spare.

 

He had the grace to apologise , saying, "sorry mate, I never saw you".

 

Now Mr Shoe, had I hit him I may well be said to be in the wrong as the overtaking vehicle , but would you think the car driver should be considered blameless?

 

Similarly if a car driver was to open his door and a cyclist ploughed into it would the cyclist be entirely to blame.

 

Just saying that things are not always black and whiteflowers.gif

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...

Just saying that things are not always black and whiteflowers.gif

Very true.

 

However, there's a difference between anticipation of something that might happen (e.g. I expect everyone to open their door on me) and arriving at an hazard too fast to do anything about it.

 

In your example, it appears that your speed while approaching the car was low enough that you safely stopped. I applaud your anticipation, driving skills and for approaching at something less than 100mph.

 

The guy doing 150mph on a public B road surrounded by sheep filled fields and other road users? Words fail.

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