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Boiled Eggs


Gladys
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None of which mention freezing eggs Barry

 

Think having them in iced water for half an hour or so may be the answer

 

No? I came across a bunch of 'em!

 

http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2011/05/frozen-hard-boiled-eggs-what-to-do-what-to-do.html

 

 

I think the issue is - Barry - that Gladys's eggs are freezing after she has cooked them & put them in the fridge, not that the good lady is buying in frozen catering eggs

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None of which mention freezing eggs Barry

 

Think having them in iced water for half an hour or so may be the answer

 

No? I came across a bunch of 'em!

 

http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2011/05/frozen-hard-boiled-eggs-what-to-do-what-to-do.html

 

 

I think the issue is - Barry - that Gladys's eggs are freezing after she has cooked them & put them in the fridge, not that the good lady is buying in frozen catering eggs

 

 

 

We all know that...try and keep up and Google some of the websites.

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Think it may be a combination of two things.

 

1. The temperature reached by cooling in iced water

 

2. The fact that they "sweat"

 

As they sweat out moisture and it evaporated that will reduce the, already, cold surface temperature and, in a cold fridge, could result in a frosted covering.

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None of which mention freezing eggs Barry

 

Think having them in iced water for half an hour or so may be the answer

 

No? I came across a bunch of 'em!

 

http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2011/05/frozen-hard-boiled-eggs-what-to-do-what-to-do.html

 

 

 

The link above does lead to a website where the inexplicable ice glazing of eggs kept in a 'fridge is reported by others. The simple solution might well be as Stuart Peters suggest, the 'fridge itself and this is mentioned via the above link...

 

So why do other items nearby not also ice glaze...? First of all, where are they placed in the 'fridge? Some areas are colder than others and some foods react differently.

 

Many decades since I did biology and physics....However, I seem to recall something about osmosis and the thin membrane round an egg inside between the shell and the meat? Likewise, salt lowering the freezing point of water?..

 

Maybe there is some transfer of minerals/salts and this has lowered the freezing point of water in the egg?....Coupled with the performance of your 'fridge...

 

There are learned articles on line about eggs/permeability of shells/osmosis by membrane..etc.....Also many articles on how eggs are stored before we buy them...ie quite common for them to be refrigerated in the USA and in Europe often not it seems??? Anyway look it up as life is too short..

 

I think the answer is water absorption in a mineral rich environment lowering the freezing point a bit like when you salt and/or saltpetre to make ice cream at home the old fashioned way and the 'fridge setting. Ice cream is an emulsion and all the best Italian makers down on my manor used eggs in their ice cream...

 

Just an idea!

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I was once told by some old lag down on my manor that if you boil eggs carefully to hardness and remove the shell without peeling off the osmotic membrane ...which is sticky...you can then roll the egg over official inked stamps in documents such that the ink comes off and you can then roll same egg over a fake document and the official stamp can be transferred. ..Seems he did this with Post Office Savings books years ago until the auditors caught up...Seems like a Colditz trick to me!

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None of which mention freezing eggs Barry

 

Think having them in iced water for half an hour or so may be the answer

 

No? I came across a bunch of 'em!

 

http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2011/05/frozen-hard-boiled-eggs-what-to-do-what-to-do.html

 

The link above does lead to a website where the inexplicable ice glazing of eggs kept in a 'fridge is reported by others. The simple solution might well be as Stuart Peters suggest, the 'fridge itself and this is mentioned via the above link...

 

So why do other items nearby not also ice glaze...? First of all, where are they placed in the 'fridge? Some areas are colder than others and some foods react differently.

 

Many decades since I did biology and physics....However, I seem to recall something about osmosis and the thin membrane round an egg inside between the shell and the meat? Likewise, salt lowering the freezing point of water?..

 

Maybe there is some transfer of minerals/salts and this has lowered the freezing point of water in the egg?....Coupled with the performance of your 'fridge...

 

There are learned articles on line about eggs/permeability of shells/osmosis by membrane..etc.....Also many articles on how eggs are stored before we buy them...ie quite common for them to be refrigerated in the USA and in Europe often not it seems??? Anyway look it up as life is too short..

 

I think the answer is water absorption in a mineral rich environment lowering the freezing point a bit like when you salt and/or saltpetre to make ice cream at home the old fashioned way and the 'fridge setting. Ice cream is an emulsion and all the best Italian makers down on my manor used eggs in their ice cream...

 

Just an idea!

Of course lowering the freezing point would have the opposite effect Barry. If it was lowered the eggs would be less likely to freeze. I'm pretty certain it's an evaporative freezing effect

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Combination of several of the points made by other posters. I regularly boil eggs and keep them in the fridge but never have the freezing issue.

 

I think the iced water, plus a fridge which is probably too cold (mine is good but never felt it gets overly cold even at max) and hey presto. Frosted eggs.

 

I have noticed the 'sweating' even when i dry the shells totally beforehand. But this never results in freezing.....possibly would if my fridge was colder though!! Do you keep them in the door or towards the back? Door could be the answer as it tends to be a degree or so warmer overall because of the opening etc.....

 

God what a boring bastard I have become :)

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