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DED spit the dummy over Airbnb?


Manx Bean
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Obviously true, until someone dies in a fire at a property which is lower than the recommended standard and then the "why did the gubmint allow this to happen" brigade will crawl out of the woodwork. Damned if you do.....................

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49 minutes ago, piebaps said:

Obviously true, until someone dies in a fire at a property which is lower than the recommended standard and then the "why did the gubmint allow this to happen" brigade will crawl out of the woodwork. Damned if you do.....................

I haven’t seen AirBNB’s reputation or share price being impacted by such an imaginary event. 

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9 hours ago, Non-Believer said:

Looking at iomtoday...homestay registrations fall after increase in fees announced. What a surprise.

Govt reaction is to wheel out D for E and Fire Service officials to spout about insurance liabilities and fire risks about unregistered homestay properties. Are they honestly surprised that people seek to avoid Govt's self imposed "cut" of earnings and salary-justifying administration for homestay operations? Given that this is all due to a lack of accommodation at leastly partly due to lack of foresight and planning?

 

1 hour ago, piebaps said:

Obviously true, until someone dies in a fire at a property which is lower than the recommended standard and then the "why did the gubmint allow this to happen" brigade will crawl out of the woodwork. Damned if you do.....................

Plus, for TT Homestay if you have a woodburner it needs to be certified. So that's another £75-£120.

Can't argue against that (except I doubt the one in our house will ever be used until next winter now) but it's another hassle and expense to contend with. Is it really worth the bother? There's the carrot of earning so much tax free but that is only of significance for people letting out whole properties.

 

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1 hour ago, thesultanofsheight said:

I haven’t seen AirBNB’s reputation or share price being impacted by such an imaginary event. 

They were a bit impacted by the fact that many enterprising folks are using other peoples properties as 'pop-up' brothels

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2 minutes ago, Donald Trumps said:

They were a bit impacted by the fact that many enterprising folks are using other peoples properties as 'pop-up' brothels

Been happening for years in Ramsey without any undue concerns... :lol:

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4 hours ago, piebaps said:

Obviously true, until someone dies in a fire at a property which is lower than the recommended standard and then the "why did the gubmint allow this to happen" brigade will crawl out of the woodwork. Damned if you do.....................

What have the government got to do with what happens within 4 walls. I'm sure no-one will look to some arbitrary authority if something happens on private property.

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I run a 3 bedroom holiday home on the island. Illegally listed properties on the island or in our case Douglas will probably cause our little business to eventually fail. Because of our ongoing expenses, we find it increasingly difficult to match the prices of illegally listed properties particularly on Airbnb. The reason why really is to do with standards that we must provide and what we can provide for the least amount of money. TT and MGP don't effect us at all but the rest of the year it's really difficult to get bookings with so much unregulated competition. For these advertisers the job in many cases is a hobby and failure wouldn't be a major issue. Running a tourism property correctly of course is a serious time consuming business where failure isn't an option. To summarise all this, I'm in favour of regulation. It's not always about the numbers of property available, sometimes the quality is more important. If anyone is interested my property is "Cooil House" Douglas. 

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AirBnB is like Uber. Don't give a shit about any rules and just muscle in on the 'it's what the people want' train. Main issue seems to be insurance and what to do if things go wrong. How does the Homestay scheme support people when things go pear shaped?

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19 hours ago, Bazza Smurf said:

I run a 3 bedroom holiday home on the island. Illegally listed properties on the island or in our case Douglas will probably cause our little business to eventually fail. Because of our ongoing expenses, we find it increasingly difficult to match the prices of illegally listed properties particularly on Airbnb. The reason why really is to do with standards that we must provide and what we can provide for the least amount of money. TT and MGP don't effect us at all but the rest of the year it's really difficult to get bookings with so much unregulated competition. For these advertisers the job in many cases is a hobby and failure wouldn't be a major issue. Running a tourism property correctly of course is a serious time consuming business where failure isn't an option. To summarise all this, I'm in favour of regulation. It's not always about the numbers of property available, sometimes the quality is more important. If anyone is interested my property is "Cooil House" Douglas. 

gangsta's paradise....

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17 hours ago, Amadeus said:

AirBnB is like Uber. Don't give a shit about any rules and just muscle in on the 'it's what the people want' train. Main issue seems to be insurance and what to do if things go wrong. How does the Homestay scheme support people when things go pear shaped?

Are they? They have a dispute resolution service and give refunds in some cases. 

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2 hours ago, Albert Tatlock said:

Are they? They have a dispute resolution service and give refunds in some cases. 

They are a bit in the respect that there are many unregulated/unregistered properties Albert. That said  from a standards point of view many will be very good even excellent, however some will be poor. All that is fine I guess providing the guest knows there are no particular standards. That's what makes Airbnb unique. There is a dispute resolution service too. I've not had to use it so can't say much about it. Uber funnily enough tries to use its own regulations. I think this is largely to ensure that the drivers remain self employed as opposed to employed by them although that said I believe a couple of drivers have already won a court case in the UK which backed the drivers claims they were employed. 

In both Airbnb and Uber scenarios the long term problem is really for the individuals involved in the businesses and not the customers. Airbnb is designed if you like to give a few quid to people that have a spare room, house, villa etc but there simply are no checks done on the local laws. All these non-regulated properties have an effect on registered and regulated properties. With these there has to be a standard to keep the star ratings or even the doors open. Uber in the long term have the intention to introduce driverless cars so I guess that's a good reason to keep all the drivers self employed as it's easier when they make thousands of them redundant. Both however are popular to the customers because largely there are good deals to be had. Is regulation a good thing. It is I think if everyone plays the same game. When some cut costs by not registering their properties for tourism to me it seems unfair at least but also in the long term will reduce standards and possibly the amount of registered properties too. Only time will tell. That's only what I think. As in all cases I may actually be wrong. 

 

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Different areas of the market really though. With AirBnB you know you're not getting hotel levels of service and quality.

Whenever I take the family or the missus away I wouldn't do AirBnB as I like to know what I'm getting and that the service and experience makes the trip worthwhile. When I am away on business I only need somewhere to rest my head for the night so AirBnB works for my need. Two differing parts of the same market. If I booked a hotel for the price of my usual AirBnB in the centre of London I dread to think what it would resemble.

There is a place for both in the market, don't let any disgruntled hotelier or jobsworth civil servant tell you any different.

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